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Active Fire Protection

The Experts below are selected from a list of 279 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Brian L. Dolph – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Fire SAFETY ANALYSIS OF THE USCGC DEPENDABLE.
    , 1999
    Co-Authors: Chester M. Sprague, Derek White, Brian L. Dolph

    Abstract:

    Abstract : This report documents the results of a Fire safety analysis of the USCGC DEPENDABLE prior to and after implementing changes associated with the Paragon project. The Paragon project reduces the normal crew by approximately 20% and implements a number of changes to supplant the loss of manual Firefighting effectiveness. These changes include a new Fire detection and monitoring system, installation of fixed surveillance cameras, and utilization of a rapid response team concept. The Ship Fire Safety Engineering Methodology (SFSEM) and associated computer program, SAFE version 2.2, were utilized as an analytical tool to perform the analysis. The SFSEM is a probabilistic based Fire risk analysis methodology. It is useful to conduct a structured and comprehensive analysis of the performance of all types of surface ships as a Fire safety system. The SFSEM provides an integrated framework for analyzing Fires on ships in comparison to established Fire safety objectives. It accounts for all relevant aspects of Fire safety including the growth and spread of Fire, the effectiveness of passive design features such as barriers, and Active Fire Protection features such as fixed and portable Fire extinguishing systems, as well as manual Fire suppression. SAFE implements the SFSEM and evaluates the probability of spaces and barriers limiting a Fire. The evaluation is conducted on a compartment-by-compartment basis. SAFE calculates the probable paths of Fire spread for user-specified time duration. SPSEM/SAFE has been successfully used to analyze the Fire safety design of existing as well as proposed ships. SAFE input data included information collected during a ship visit to the CGC DEPENDABLE during the period 30 September – 3 October 1997. Baseline Fire safety analysis results show that with just passive Fire Protection in effect (without considering automated or manual Fire Protection), all compartments in the DEPENDABLE exceed Fire safety objectives, both in port and at sea. c

  • Fire Safety Analysis of the 270′ WMEC Medium Endurance Cutter
    , 1998
    Co-Authors: Chester M. Sprague, Ajay V. Prasad, Derek White, Brian L. Dolph

    Abstract:

    Abstract : This report documents the results of a comprehensive Fire safety analysis of the 270′ WMEC Medium Endurance Cutter. The Ship Fire Safety Engineering Methodology (SFSEM) and associated computer program, SAFE version 2.2, were utilized as an analytical tool to perform the analysis. The SFSEM is a probabilistic based Fire risk analysis methodology. It is useful to conduct a structured and comprehensive analysis of the performance of all types of surface ships as a Fire safety systern. The SFSEM provides an integrated framework for analyzing Fires on ships in comparison to established Fire safety objectives. It accounts for all relevant aspects of Fire safety including the growth and spread of Fire, the effectiveness of passive design features such as barriers, and Active Fire Protection features such as fixed and portable Fire extinguishing systems, as well as manual Fire suppression. SAFE implements the SFSEM and evaluates the probability of space and barriers limiting a Fire. The evaluation is conducted on a compartment-by.compartment basis. SAFE calculates the probable paths of Fire spread for a user-specified time duration. SFSEMISAFE has been successfully used to analyze the Fire safety design of existing, as well as proposed ships. The input data was based on information collected during a ship visit to the CGC SPENCER (WMEC 905) during the period 22-24 July 1996. Baseline Fire safety analysis results show that with all passive and Active Fire Protection features in effect, all compartments in the cutter exceed established Fire safety objectives, both in port and at sea. With just passive Fire Protection in effect (without considering automated 9r manual Fire Protection), one compartment in the 270′ WMEC fails to meet Fire safety objectives in port and sea. Passive Protection must be augmented by manual Fire Protection for all compartments to meet or exceed Fire safety objectives in port and at sea. Pro

  • Fire Safety Analysis of the 180′ WLB Seagoing Buoy Tender.
    , 1998
    Co-Authors: Chester M. Sprague, Derek White, Brian L. Dolph

    Abstract:

    Abstract : This report documents the results of a comprehensive Fire safety analysis of the 180′ WLB Seagoing Buoy Tender. The Ship Fire Safety Engineering Methodology (SFSEM) and associated Ship Applied Fire Engineering (SAFE V 2.2), were utilized as an analytical tool to perform the analysis. The SFSEM is a probabilistic based Fire risk analysis methodology. SAFE implements the SFSEM and evaluates the probability of spaces and barriers limiting a Fire. Visits to the CGC HORNBEAM were made to collect input data. Baseline Fire safety analysis results show that with all passive and Active Fire Protection features in effect, the cutter exceeds the established Fire safety objectives by a very substantial margin both in port and at sea. With just passive Fire Protection in effect (without considering automated or manual Fire Protection), the 180′ WLB exceeds its Fire safety objectives in every compartment. The passive Fire Protection in this cutter may be enhanced due to effective use of compartmentation to segregate engineering spaces and due to the fact that many of the bulkheads are constructed of insulated steel. The most probable rooms of origin for Fires that may spread to involve multiple compartments are the Motor Room, Auxiliary Machinery Space #3, Linen Locker and Cleaning Gear Locker. A careful analysis of the results from the various output options in SAFE provided in this report may be effectively used to develop realistic Fire scenarios to assist the crew in planning Firefighting training drills.

Wan Ki Chow – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A retrospective survey on elevator evacuation of supertall buildings under Fires
    Journal of Applied Fire Science, 2006
    Co-Authors: Wan Ki Chow

    Abstract:

    Many supertall buildings up to 500mare constructed in the Far East. Big Fires in such tall buildings during office hours are a nightmare to Firemen. Lots of combustibles might be stored in crowded offices with glass facades. Big Fires in tall buildings have been observed many times all over the world. Evacuation is identified as the key problem. Full evacuation is impossible for supertall buildings, taking over 2 hours even in a normal Fire drill with good orders. Refuge floors and staged evacuation might be a solution. However, there are queries on whether refuge floors are safe under big post-flashover Fires after the World Trade Center tragedy. Elevators are proposed for selective use in the case of Fire for accelerating the evacuation process. Studies on elevator evacuation for tall buildings of normal height started over 20 years ago in North America. Results on smoke movement and its management in tall buildings of normal height, human behavior and orderly evacuation, evacuation times modeling, integration with refuge evacuation, and water damage were reported. None of those works related specifically to supertall buildings under big Fires. In fact, the use of elevators is included in the evacuation strategy for several supertall buildings in Hong Kong. The elevator systems, however, are not demonstrated to be safe in a Fire, leading to deep concern from local Fire authority. There is an urgent need to evaluate performance of such existing elevator systems for emergency evacuation in supertall buildings. Active Fire Protection systems should be upgraded if necessary. In this article, concerns of elevator evacuation are summarized. Points of consideration in designing safe elevator systems in supertall buildings under big Fires will be discussed with reference to the literature works.Department of Building Services Engineerin

  • Building Fire Safety in the Far East
    Architectural Science Review, 2005
    Co-Authors: Wan Ki Chow

    Abstract:

    Building Fire safety activities in the Far East will be briefly reviewed in this paper. Fire safety concerns in some buildings with new architectural features will be discussed. Glass constructions need special attention. Key points on building Fire safety provisions, including both passive building construction and Active Fire Protection systems will be pointed out. Whether the current Fire codes are applicable for new architectural features, the use of new materials, new style of living and capability of solving the new Fire safety problems will be discussed. The total Fire safety concept of implementing software Fire safety management to control hardware provisions is recommended. Application of Fire models is reviewed. Performance-based design is then discussed. New problems to consider such as Fire spread over buildings, crowd movement and control, and Fire impact to structures are outlined.

  • Proposed Fire safety strategy on airport terminals
    International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management, 2005
    Co-Authors: Candy M.y. Ng, Wan Ki Chow

    Abstract:

    Fire safety strategy for airport terminals will be proposed in this paper. The local airport terminal is taken as an example. Special features of airport terminals will be outlined. The retail areas are identified as places with higher Fire risk. Standards, codes and design guidelines used overseas are reviewed and compared with the local codes. Based on the study, Fire safety strategy is suggested to have four parts: • passive building construction for Fire safety • Active Fire Protection systems or Fire services installation • Fire safety management • control of risk factors. All four parts will be discussed in this paper. Suggestions are made to give a Fire safe airport terminal.

Chester M. Sprague – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Fire SAFETY ANALYSIS OF THE USCGC DEPENDABLE.
    , 1999
    Co-Authors: Chester M. Sprague, Derek White, Brian L. Dolph

    Abstract:

    Abstract : This report documents the results of a Fire safety analysis of the USCGC DEPENDABLE prior to and after implementing changes associated with the Paragon project. The Paragon project reduces the normal crew by approximately 20% and implements a number of changes to supplant the loss of manual Firefighting effectiveness. These changes include a new Fire detection and monitoring system, installation of fixed surveillance cameras, and utilization of a rapid response team concept. The Ship Fire Safety Engineering Methodology (SFSEM) and associated computer program, SAFE version 2.2, were utilized as an analytical tool to perform the analysis. The SFSEM is a probabilistic based Fire risk analysis methodology. It is useful to conduct a structured and comprehensive analysis of the performance of all types of surface ships as a Fire safety system. The SFSEM provides an integrated framework for analyzing Fires on ships in comparison to established Fire safety objectives. It accounts for all relevant aspects of Fire safety including the growth and spread of Fire, the effectiveness of passive design features such as barriers, and Active Fire Protection features such as fixed and portable Fire extinguishing systems, as well as manual Fire suppression. SAFE implements the SFSEM and evaluates the probability of spaces and barriers limiting a Fire. The evaluation is conducted on a compartment-by-compartment basis. SAFE calculates the probable paths of Fire spread for user-specified time duration. SPSEM/SAFE has been successfully used to analyze the Fire safety design of existing as well as proposed ships. SAFE input data included information collected during a ship visit to the CGC DEPENDABLE during the period 30 September – 3 October 1997. Baseline Fire safety analysis results show that with just passive Fire Protection in effect (without considering automated or manual Fire Protection), all compartments in the DEPENDABLE exceed Fire safety objectives, both in port and at sea. c

  • Fire Safety Analysis of the 270′ WMEC Medium Endurance Cutter
    , 1998
    Co-Authors: Chester M. Sprague, Ajay V. Prasad, Derek White, Brian L. Dolph

    Abstract:

    Abstract : This report documents the results of a comprehensive Fire safety analysis of the 270′ WMEC Medium Endurance Cutter. The Ship Fire Safety Engineering Methodology (SFSEM) and associated computer program, SAFE version 2.2, were utilized as an analytical tool to perform the analysis. The SFSEM is a probabilistic based Fire risk analysis methodology. It is useful to conduct a structured and comprehensive analysis of the performance of all types of surface ships as a Fire safety systern. The SFSEM provides an integrated framework for analyzing Fires on ships in comparison to established Fire safety objectives. It accounts for all relevant aspects of Fire safety including the growth and spread of Fire, the effectiveness of passive design features such as barriers, and Active Fire Protection features such as fixed and portable Fire extinguishing systems, as well as manual Fire suppression. SAFE implements the SFSEM and evaluates the probability of space and barriers limiting a Fire. The evaluation is conducted on a compartment-by.compartment basis. SAFE calculates the probable paths of Fire spread for a user-specified time duration. SFSEMISAFE has been successfully used to analyze the Fire safety design of existing, as well as proposed ships. The input data was based on information collected during a ship visit to the CGC SPENCER (WMEC 905) during the period 22-24 July 1996. Baseline Fire safety analysis results show that with all passive and Active Fire Protection features in effect, all compartments in the cutter exceed established Fire safety objectives, both in port and at sea. With just passive Fire Protection in effect (without considering automated 9r manual Fire Protection), one compartment in the 270′ WMEC fails to meet Fire safety objectives in port and sea. Passive Protection must be augmented by manual Fire Protection for all compartments to meet or exceed Fire safety objectives in port and at sea. Pro

  • Fire Safety Analysis of the 180′ WLB Seagoing Buoy Tender.
    , 1998
    Co-Authors: Chester M. Sprague, Derek White, Brian L. Dolph

    Abstract:

    Abstract : This report documents the results of a comprehensive Fire safety analysis of the 180′ WLB Seagoing Buoy Tender. The Ship Fire Safety Engineering Methodology (SFSEM) and associated Ship Applied Fire Engineering (SAFE V 2.2), were utilized as an analytical tool to perform the analysis. The SFSEM is a probabilistic based Fire risk analysis methodology. SAFE implements the SFSEM and evaluates the probability of spaces and barriers limiting a Fire. Visits to the CGC HORNBEAM were made to collect input data. Baseline Fire safety analysis results show that with all passive and Active Fire Protection features in effect, the cutter exceeds the established Fire safety objectives by a very substantial margin both in port and at sea. With just passive Fire Protection in effect (without considering automated or manual Fire Protection), the 180′ WLB exceeds its Fire safety objectives in every compartment. The passive Fire Protection in this cutter may be enhanced due to effective use of compartmentation to segregate engineering spaces and due to the fact that many of the bulkheads are constructed of insulated steel. The most probable rooms of origin for Fires that may spread to involve multiple compartments are the Motor Room, Auxiliary Machinery Space #3, Linen Locker and Cleaning Gear Locker. A careful analysis of the results from the various output options in SAFE provided in this report may be effectively used to develop realistic Fire scenarios to assist the crew in planning Firefighting training drills.