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Julie M. Goddard – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Performance of photo-curable metal-chelating Active Packaging coating in complex food matrices
    Food Chemistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Julie M. Goddard

    Abstract:

    Abstract Many packaged goods undergo transition metal-catalyzed oxidative spoilage. Recently, a nonmigratory photocurable metal-chelating coating was developed as an innovative Active Packaging approach to control oxidation of foods. In the present study, we investigate the influence of competing ions and increasing viscosity on the iron-chelating capacity and antioxidant efficacy of this coating in a model complex food system. The addition of calcium and magnesium causes a decrease in iron chelating capacity; however, 61% chelating capacity of materials was retained when 0.8 M sodium was present. Materials retained iron-chelating capacity even in solutions of 2700 cP, similar to the viscosity of salad dressing. Additionally, metal-chelating films significantly delayed transition metal-catalyzed ascorbic acid degradation, even in the presence of competing ions and at increased viscosity. These results suggest that metal-chelating Active Packaging coatings may present a new technological approach to addressing consumer demands for reduced additive use while controlling food spoilage and waste.

  • Photo‐Curable Metal‐Chelating Coatings Offer a Scalable Approach to Production of Antioxidant Active Packaging
    Journal of Food Science, 2018
    Co-Authors: Julie M. Goddard

    Abstract:

    Synthetic metal chelators (for example, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA) are widely used as additives to control trace transition metal induced oxidation in consumer products. To enable removal of synthetic chelators in response to increasing consumer demand for clean label products, metal‐chelating Active food Packaging technologies have been developed with demonstrated antioxidant efficacy in simulated food systems. However, prior work in fabrication of metal‐chelating materials leveraged batch chemical reactions to tether metal‐chelating ligands, a process with limited industrial translatability for large‐scale fabrication. To improve the industrial translatability, we have designed a 2‐step laminated photo‐grafting process to introduce metal chelating functionality onto common polymeric Packaging materials. Iminodiacetic acid (IDA) functionalized materials were fabricated by photo‐grafting poly(acrylic acid) onto polypropylene (PP) films, followed by a second photo‐grafting process to graft‐polymerize an IDA functionalized vinyl monomer (GMA‐IDA). The photo‐grafting was conducted under atmospheric conditions and was completed in 2 min. The resulting IDA functionalized metal‐chelating material was able to chelate iron and copper, and showed antioxidant efficacy against ascorbic acid degradation, supporting its potential to be used synergistically with natural antioxidants for preservation of food and beverage products. The 2‐step photo‐grafting process improves the throughput of Active Packaging coatings, enabling potential roll‐to‐roll fabrication of metal‐chelating Active Packaging materials for antioxidant food Packaging applications. To address consumer and retail demands for “clean label” foods and beverages without a corresponding loss in product quality and shelf life, producers are seeking next generation technologies such as Active Packaging. In this work, we will report the synthesis of metal‐chelating Active Packaging films, which enable removal of the synthetic additive, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. The new synthesis technique improves the throughput of metal‐chelating Active Packaging coatings, enabling potential roll‐to‐roll fabrication of the materials for antioxidant food Packaging applications.

  • Biomimetic polyphenol coatings for antioxidant Active Packaging applications
    Colloid and Interface Science Communications, 2016
    Co-Authors: Maxine J. Roman, Eric A Decker, Julie M. Goddard

    Abstract:

    Abstract Oxidative instability of food, pharmaceutical, and consumer products can be promoted by trace metals, especially iron and copper, with subsequent propagation of free radicals. Plant-derived phenolic compounds that contain catechols are reported to have free radical scavenging, metal chelating and surface adhesion properties upon polymerization. The objective of this study was to synthesize biomimetic polyphenol coatings for development of antioxidant Active Packaging materials. Two synthetic routes were explored to apply polyphenol coatings to the surface of polypropylene by in situ polymerization of a mixture of catechol and catechin and oxidative polymerization with laccase and in alkaline saline. Both polyphenol coatings demonstrated potent metal chelating and radical scavenging capacity, which suggest potential antioxidant capacity. Dual functionality of polyphenol coatings as potent antioxidants and anchors makes them a promising candidate for Active Packaging coatings that can inhibit metal-promoted oxidative degradation.

Vibeke Orlien – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rosemary and oxygen scavenger in Active Packaging for prevention of high-pressure induced lipid oxidation in pork patties
    Food Packaging and Shelf Life, 2016
    Co-Authors: Tomas Bolumar, David LaPeña, Leif H Skibsted, Vibeke Orlien

    Abstract:

    Three different Packaging systems: vacuum Packaging, rosemary Active Packaging, and oxygen scavenger Packaging were compared for their ability to counteract lipid oxidation in pork patties upon storage at 5 °C for 60 days following high pressure processing (HPP) (700 MPa, 10 min, 5 °C). Lipid oxidation was studied at the surface and the inner part by measuring secondary lipid oxidation products (TBARs) and the tendency to form radicals by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Lipid oxidation was lower in the inner part than at the surface for all three Packaging systems. Rosemary Active Packaging was the most effective method to protect pork patties from the HPP-induced lipid oxidation, while oxygen scavenger Packaging was not effective since residual oxygen remained in the package in the initial period of storage. The kinetics of the oxygen trapping by oxygen scavengers appears to be a crucial factor for this application.

  • antioxidant Active Packaging for chicken meat processed by high pressure treatment
    Food Chemistry, 2011
    Co-Authors: Tomas Bolumar, Mogens L Andersen, Vibeke Orlien

    Abstract:

    Abstract Patties made of minced chicken breast and thigh packed in standard vacuum-Packaging (C) or in antioxidant Active Packaging (AP) were subjected to high pressure treatment (800 MPa, 10 min, 5 °C) and subsequently stored for 25 days at 5 °C. Lipid oxidation was studied at the surface (S) and the inner (I) parts of the meat patties. The lipid oxidation was higher in the surface part and the Active Packaging was able to delay it up to 25 days. The lipid oxidation was limited in the inner part of the meat patties and restrained at the surface of the Active Packaging. It was found that the effect on lipid oxidation by high pressure may not be explained solely by cell membrane damage, as radicals were formed in the meat during the pressure treatment.

Tomas Bolumar – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rosemary and oxygen scavenger in Active Packaging for prevention of high-pressure induced lipid oxidation in pork patties
    Food Packaging and Shelf Life, 2016
    Co-Authors: Tomas Bolumar, David LaPeña, Leif H Skibsted, Vibeke Orlien

    Abstract:

    Three different Packaging systems: vacuum Packaging, rosemary Active Packaging, and oxygen scavenger Packaging were compared for their ability to counteract lipid oxidation in pork patties upon storage at 5 °C for 60 days following high pressure processing (HPP) (700 MPa, 10 min, 5 °C). Lipid oxidation was studied at the surface and the inner part by measuring secondary lipid oxidation products (TBARs) and the tendency to form radicals by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Lipid oxidation was lower in the inner part than at the surface for all three Packaging systems. Rosemary Active Packaging was the most effective method to protect pork patties from the HPP-induced lipid oxidation, while oxygen scavenger Packaging was not effective since residual oxygen remained in the package in the initial period of storage. The kinetics of the oxygen trapping by oxygen scavengers appears to be a crucial factor for this application.

  • antioxidant Active Packaging for chicken meat processed by high pressure treatment
    Food Chemistry, 2011
    Co-Authors: Tomas Bolumar, Mogens L Andersen, Vibeke Orlien

    Abstract:

    Abstract Patties made of minced chicken breast and thigh packed in standard vacuum-Packaging (C) or in antioxidant Active Packaging (AP) were subjected to high pressure treatment (800 MPa, 10 min, 5 °C) and subsequently stored for 25 days at 5 °C. Lipid oxidation was studied at the surface (S) and the inner (I) parts of the meat patties. The lipid oxidation was higher in the surface part and the Active Packaging was able to delay it up to 25 days. The lipid oxidation was limited in the inner part of the meat patties and restrained at the surface of the Active Packaging. It was found that the effect on lipid oxidation by high pressure may not be explained solely by cell membrane damage, as radicals were formed in the meat during the pressure treatment.