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Miriam Merad – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • high dimensional single cell mapping of cerium distribution in the lung immune microenvironment of an Active Smoker
    Cytometry Part B-clinical Cytometry, 2018
    Co-Authors: Adeeb Rahman, Yonit Lavin, Soma Kobayashi, Andrew Leader, Miriam Merad
    Abstract:

    Background: Mass cytometry leverages inductively coupled mass spectrometry to perform high dimensional single cell analyses using antibodies tagged with rare earth isotopes that are considered to be largely absent in biological samples. We have recently noted an unusual exception to this rule while analyzing tissue samples from patients undergoing surgical resection for early stage lung cancer, and here we present a detailed cytometric characterization of cerium in a clinical patient sample. Methods: We performed a CyTOF analysis on cell suspensions derived from matched blood, tumor lesion, and non-involved lung tissue from an Active Smoker undergoing surgical resection for early stage lung adenocarcinoma. The samples were stained with a 31-parameter antibody panel to allow a detailed characterization of the cellular heterogeneity of the samples. The data were visualized using viSNE, major immune subsets were identified based on canonical marker expression patterns, and single cell cerium levels were evaluated across each of these defined subsets. Results: High dimensional immune cell mapping revealed that high levels of cerium were specifically associated with a phenotypically-distinct subset of lung macrophages that were most prevalent in non-involved lung tissue, whereas tumor associated macrophages showed relatively lower levels of cerium. We hypothesize that these findings reflect alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of inhaled cerium derived from cigarette flint lighters. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the first high-dimensional single cell characterization of environmental metal exposure associated with smoking, and offer a demonstration of the unique potential for applying mass cytometry to the field of environmental toxicology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • High‐dimensional single cell mapping of cerium distribution in the lung immune microenvironment of an Active Smoker
    Cytometry. Part B Clinical cytometry, 2017
    Co-Authors: Adeeb Rahman, Yonit Lavin, Soma Kobayashi, Andrew Leader, Miriam Merad
    Abstract:

    Background: Mass cytometry leverages inductively coupled mass spectrometry to perform high dimensional single cell analyses using antibodies tagged with rare earth isotopes that are considered to be largely absent in biological samples. We have recently noted an unusual exception to this rule while analyzing tissue samples from patients undergoing surgical resection for early stage lung cancer, and here we present a detailed cytometric characterization of cerium in a clinical patient sample. Methods: We performed a CyTOF analysis on cell suspensions derived from matched blood, tumor lesion, and non-involved lung tissue from an Active Smoker undergoing surgical resection for early stage lung adenocarcinoma. The samples were stained with a 31-parameter antibody panel to allow a detailed characterization of the cellular heterogeneity of the samples. The data were visualized using viSNE, major immune subsets were identified based on canonical marker expression patterns, and single cell cerium levels were evaluated across each of these defined subsets. Results: High dimensional immune cell mapping revealed that high levels of cerium were specifically associated with a phenotypically-distinct subset of lung macrophages that were most prevalent in non-involved lung tissue, whereas tumor associated macrophages showed relatively lower levels of cerium. We hypothesize that these findings reflect alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of inhaled cerium derived from cigarette flint lighters. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the first high-dimensional single cell characterization of environmental metal exposure associated with smoking, and offer a demonstration of the unique potential for applying mass cytometry to the field of environmental toxicology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Frédéric Aubriet – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Active and passive smoking – New insights on the molecular composition of different cigarette smoke aerosols by LDI-FTICRMS
    Atmospheric Environment, 2014
    Co-Authors: Sébastien Schramm, Vincent Carré, Jean-luc Schefflerd, Frédéric Aubriet
    Abstract:

    The aerosol generated when a cigarette is smoked is a significant indoor contaminant. Both Smokers and non-Smokers can be exposed to this class of pollutants. Nevertheless, they are not exposed to the same kind of smoke. The Active Smoker breathes in the mainstream smoke (MSS) during a puff, whereas the passive Smoker inhales not only the smoke generated by the lit cigarette between two puffs (SSS) but also the smoke exhaled by Active Smokers (EXS). The aerosol fraction of EXS has until now been poorly documented; its composition is expected to be different from MSS. This study aims to investigate the complex composition of aerosol from EXS to better understand the difference in exposure between Active and passive Smokers. To address this, the in-situ laser desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (LDI-FTICRMS) was used to characterise the aerosol composition of EXS from two different Smokers. Results clearly indicated many similarities between EXS samples but also significant differences with MSS and SSS aerosol. The comparison of MSS and EXS aerosol allowed the chemicals retained by the Active Smoker‘s lungs to be identified, whereas the convolution of the EXS and SSS aerosol compositions were considered relevant to the exposition of a passive Smoker. As a consequence, Active Smokers are thought to be mainly exposed to polar and poorly unsaturated oxygenated and nitrogenated organics, compared with poorly oxygenated but highly unsaturated compounds in passive Smokers.

  • Active and passive smoking – New insights on the molecular composition of different cigarette smoke aerosols by LDI–FTICRMS
    Atmospheric Environment, 2014
    Co-Authors: Sébastien Schramm, Vincent Carré, Jean-luc Scheffler, Frédéric Aubriet
    Abstract:

    Abstract The aerosol generated when a cigarette is smoked is a significant indoor contaminant. Both Smokers and non-Smokers can be exposed to this class of pollutants. Nevertheless, they are not exposed to the same kind of smoke. The Active Smoker breathes in the mainstream smoke (MSS) during a puff, whereas the passive Smoker inhales not only the smoke generated by the lit cigarette between two puffs (SSS) but also the smoke exhaled by Active Smokers (EXS). The aerosol fraction of EXS has until now been poorly documented; its composition is expected to be different from MSS. This study aims to investigate the complex composition of aerosol from EXS to better understand the difference in exposure between Active and passive Smokers. To address this, the in-situ laser desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (LDI–FTICRMS) was used to characterise the aerosol composition of EXS from two different Smokers. Results clearly indicated many similarities between EXS samples but also significant differences with MSS and SSS aerosol. The comparison of MSS and EXS aerosol allowed the chemicals retained by the Active Smoker‘s lungs to be identified, whereas the convolution of the EXS and SSS aerosol compositions were considered relevant to the exposition of a passive Smoker. As a consequence, Active Smokers are thought to be mainly exposed to polar and poorly unsaturated oxygenated and nitrogenated organics, compared with poorly oxygenated but highly unsaturated compounds in passive Smokers.

Edie Y Chan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • liver transplantation to the Active Smoker transplant provider opinions and how they have changed transplantation in Smokers a survey
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, 2015
    Co-Authors: Vidya A Fleetwood, Martin Hertl, Edie Y Chan
    Abstract:

    Awareness of smoking complications in liver transplantation patients is increasing. No study in the past 15 years has addressed attitudes toward offering transplantation to Smokers. Our aim was to determine smoking policies nationwide. We conducted a survey of liver transplantation centers. The seven-question survey was sent to medical and surgical directors of liver transplantation. Results were analyzed in R 3.1.1 using two-tailed t testing and ANOVA. Fifty one of 110 centers (46 %) responded. Volume transplanted annually ranged from 10 to 190. Most respondents acknowledged a policy on smoking (38/51, 75 %). Most centers with policies required cessation (32/38, 84 %). All other centers did encourage attempts at cessation (19/19, 100 %). Whether smoking cessation was required differed by region (p = 0.02). Southern programs more commonly required smoking cessation (87.5 vs. 38.4 %, p < 0.001). The highest rates of smoking cessation were noted in the Southwest (90.0 %) and the lowest in the Northeast (26.2 %). There was a trend toward requiring cessation in larger-volume centers. Most respondents had a tobacco policy and tended to require abstinence; however, ultimately centers were divided on requiring cessation. Regional differences were noted, with the South more commonly requiring cessation. Our results indicate lack of consensus among transplantation centers regarding access of Smokers to liver transplantation.

Ardina Rinny – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Trombositosis: Faktor Risiko Peningkatan Penyempitan Pembuluh Darah pada Petani, Buruh dan Penambak Ikan yang Merupakan Perokok Aktif di Kelurahan Tanjung Pinang Kota Palangka Raya
    'Universitas Muhammadiyah Palangkaraya', 2019
    Co-Authors: Ardina Rinny
    Abstract:

    Active Smokers are people who are smoking continuously. The population of Active Smokers in Central Kalimantan was 26,5% in 2013. The farmer, fish farmer, and laborer had a large proportion (44.5%) as an Active Smoker than another job that reported according to types of jobs. Cigarettes contain many toxic and addictive chemicals. Majority of Active Smokers that was living in Kelurahan Tanjung Pinang Kota Palangka Raya, especially who live in Jl. Bengaris works as a farmer, fish farmer, or laborer. Active Smokers have a high risk of suffering from heart disease. Cigarette compound that harmful can cause endothelial tissue dysfunction in heart blood vessels and following by thrombus formation that due to increased platelet counts and platelet aggregation. This study aimed to describe of platelet count in Active Smokers in Jl. Bengaris Kelurahan Tanjung Pinang, Palangka Raya. The descriptive observational method was used in this study. The sample obtained by 48 people with purposive sampsampling technique with criteria such as Active Smokers, men, working as farmers, fish farmers, or laborers, no history of the disease, and willing to be respondent. Examination of platelet count was done by hematology analyzer. The average of respondents aged 20-30 years (35.4%) and 31-40 years (31.2%), worked as farmers (43.7%) and laborers (41.7%), duration of smoking were 1-10 year (37.5%), consumption of smoking was 11-20 cigarettes / day (41.7%), and rest periods were > 6 hours / day (64.6%). There was one person of the Active Smoker with a high platelet count (2.1%) and normal platelet count of 47 people (97.9%)

  • Efek Merokok Berat terhadap Jumlah Leukosit dan Jenis Leukosit pada Pria Usia Produktif di Kelurahan Tanjung Pinang Kota Palangka Raya
    'Universitas Muhammadiyah Palangkaraya', 2019
    Co-Authors: Ardina Rinny, Soraya Nada
    Abstract:

    Prevalence of productive men Smokers in Kalimantan Tengah in 2013 has been reached 64.9% with a mean of smoking about 12.3 cigarettes a day. Cigarette smoke contains 1015 of oxidative free radicals which can cause oxidative stress. It will trigger of activation of inflammatory genes and increase of cytokines release by increasing of leukocytes and activate some of the differential leukocytes. Continual inflammation can cause atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. This study aimed to determine the effects of heavy smoking on white blood cell count and differential leukocyte count in productive men in Kelurahan Tanjung Pinang, Palangka Raya. This study used a descriptive observational method with a cross-sectional design. The sample obtained by 28 people with purposive sampsampling technique with criteria: men, Active Smoker, smoking more than ten years, working as a farmer, fish farmer, or laborer, and willing to become a respondent. White blood cell count and differential leukocyte count were analyzed by an automatic method using Hematology Analyzer. The results showed that 3.6% of Active Smokers had high white blood cell count and others had low white blood cell count (3.6% ). Whereas differential leukocyte count showed that 2 persons had high of eosinophils (7.10%), 5 people had low of eosinophils (17.9%), one person had little of neutrophils (3.6%), 2 persons had high of lymphocytes (7.20%), 10 people had little of lymphocytes (35.7%), and 15 people had high of monocytes (53.6%). To reduce the risks, preventive and educative actions from medical personnel are needed for Active Smokers and their families

  • Trombositosis: Faktor Risiko Peningkatan Aterosklerosis pada Perokok Pasif di Kecamatan Pahandut Kota Palangka Raya
    'Universitas Muhammadiyah Palangkaraya', 2019
    Co-Authors: Ardina Rinny
    Abstract:

    Passive Smokers that exposure to cigarette smoke in their house has been reached 78,4%. Inhaled of cigarette smoke in the room was more dangerous than in an open place. Every puff of cigarette smoke from Active Smoker contains 1015 of free radicals which can cause oxidative stress. The presence of free radicals will trigger of activation of inflammatory genes, and then they can be activated of endothelial cells, dysfunction, and injury. Oxidative stress also stimulates large production of platelet (thrombogenesis) and followed by excessive formation of fibrin and thrombin. So that can cause thrombus in endothelial tissue, and it subsequently develops into atherosclerosis. This study aimed to describe thrombocytosis as a risk factor for increased of atherosclerosis in passive Smokers in Kecamatan Pahandut, Kota Palangka Raya. This study used a descriptive observational method with a cross-sectional design. The sample obtained by 45 people with purposive sampsampling technique with criteria such as respondents were passive Smokers, housewives, exposed to cigarette smoke more than five years, no history of the disease, and willing to become respondents. Examination of platelet counts was analyzed by an automatic method using Hematology Analyzer. The results showed that 6.7% of passive Smokers had high platelet counts (thrombocytosis). High platelet counts in 6.7% of passive Smokers caused by exposure of cigarette smoke from Active Smokers can endanger passive smoking, especially the risk of atherosclerosis. Therefore, a preventive and educative method for both passive and Active Smokers are needed to prevent the dangers of cigarette smoke to the risk of atherosclerosi

Adeeb Rahman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • high dimensional single cell mapping of cerium distribution in the lung immune microenvironment of an Active Smoker
    Cytometry Part B-clinical Cytometry, 2018
    Co-Authors: Adeeb Rahman, Yonit Lavin, Soma Kobayashi, Andrew Leader, Miriam Merad
    Abstract:

    Background: Mass cytometry leverages inductively coupled mass spectrometry to perform high dimensional single cell analyses using antibodies tagged with rare earth isotopes that are considered to be largely absent in biological samples. We have recently noted an unusual exception to this rule while analyzing tissue samples from patients undergoing surgical resection for early stage lung cancer, and here we present a detailed cytometric characterization of cerium in a clinical patient sample. Methods: We performed a CyTOF analysis on cell suspensions derived from matched blood, tumor lesion, and non-involved lung tissue from an Active Smoker undergoing surgical resection for early stage lung adenocarcinoma. The samples were stained with a 31-parameter antibody panel to allow a detailed characterization of the cellular heterogeneity of the samples. The data were visualized using viSNE, major immune subsets were identified based on canonical marker expression patterns, and single cell cerium levels were evaluated across each of these defined subsets. Results: High dimensional immune cell mapping revealed that high levels of cerium were specifically associated with a phenotypically-distinct subset of lung macrophages that were most prevalent in non-involved lung tissue, whereas tumor associated macrophages showed relatively lower levels of cerium. We hypothesize that these findings reflect alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of inhaled cerium derived from cigarette flint lighters. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the first high-dimensional single cell characterization of environmental metal exposure associated with smoking, and offer a demonstration of the unique potential for applying mass cytometry to the field of environmental toxicology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • High‐dimensional single cell mapping of cerium distribution in the lung immune microenvironment of an Active Smoker
    Cytometry. Part B Clinical cytometry, 2017
    Co-Authors: Adeeb Rahman, Yonit Lavin, Soma Kobayashi, Andrew Leader, Miriam Merad
    Abstract:

    Background: Mass cytometry leverages inductively coupled mass spectrometry to perform high dimensional single cell analyses using antibodies tagged with rare earth isotopes that are considered to be largely absent in biological samples. We have recently noted an unusual exception to this rule while analyzing tissue samples from patients undergoing surgical resection for early stage lung cancer, and here we present a detailed cytometric characterization of cerium in a clinical patient sample. Methods: We performed a CyTOF analysis on cell suspensions derived from matched blood, tumor lesion, and non-involved lung tissue from an Active Smoker undergoing surgical resection for early stage lung adenocarcinoma. The samples were stained with a 31-parameter antibody panel to allow a detailed characterization of the cellular heterogeneity of the samples. The data were visualized using viSNE, major immune subsets were identified based on canonical marker expression patterns, and single cell cerium levels were evaluated across each of these defined subsets. Results: High dimensional immune cell mapping revealed that high levels of cerium were specifically associated with a phenotypically-distinct subset of lung macrophages that were most prevalent in non-involved lung tissue, whereas tumor associated macrophages showed relatively lower levels of cerium. We hypothesize that these findings reflect alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of inhaled cerium derived from cigarette flint lighters. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the first high-dimensional single cell characterization of environmental metal exposure associated with smoking, and offer a demonstration of the unique potential for applying mass cytometry to the field of environmental toxicology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.