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Hans Orru – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • climate change response in europe what s the reality analysis of Adaptation and mitigation Plans from 200 urban areas in 11 countries
    Climatic Change, 2014
    Co-Authors: D Reckien, Hans Orru, Johannes Flacke, Richard Dawson, O Heidrich, Marta Olazabal, Aoife Foley, Jp J Hamann

    Abstract:

    Urban areas are pivotal to global Adaptation and mitigation efforts. But how do cities actually perform in terms of climate change response? This study sheds light on the state of urban climate change Adaptation and mitigation Planning across Europe. Europe is an excellent test case given its advanced environmental policies and high urbanization. We performed a detailed analysis of 200 large and medium-sized cities across 11 European countries and analysed the cities’ climate change Adaptation and mitigation Plans. We investigate the regional distribution of Plans, Adaptation and mitigation foci and the extent to which Planned greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions contribute to national and international climate objectives. To our knowledge, it is the first study of its kind as it does not rely on self-assessment (questionnaires or social surveys). Our results show that 35 % of European cities studied have no dedicated mitigation Plan and 72 % have no Adaptation Plan. No city has an Adaptation Plan without a mitigation Plan. One quarter of the cities have both an Adaptation and a mitigation Plan and set quantitative GHG reduction targets, but those vary extensively in scope and ambition. Furthermore, we show that if the Planned actions within cities are nationally representative the 11 countries investigated would achieve a 37 % reduction in GHG emissions by 2050, translating into a 27 % reduction in GHG emissions for the EU as a whole. However, the actions would often be insufficient to reach national targets and fall short of the 80 % reduction in GHG emissions recommended to avoid global mean temperature rising by 2 °C above pre-industrial levels.

  • climate change response in europe what s the reality analysis of Adaptation and mitigation Plans from 200 urban areas in 11 countries
    Climatic Change, 2014
    Co-Authors: D Reckien, Hans Orru, Johannes Flacke, Richard Dawson, O Heidrich, Marta Olazabal, Aoife Foley, Jp J Hamann

    Abstract:

    Urban areas are pivotal to global Adaptation and mitigation efforts. But how do cities actually perform in terms of climate change response? This study sheds light on the state of urban climate change Adaptation and mitigation Planning across Europe. Europe is an excellent test case given its advanced environmental policies and high urbanization. We performed a detailed analysis of 200 large and medium-sized cities across 11 European countries and analysed the cities’ climate change Adaptation and mitigation Plans. We investigate the regional distribution of Plans, Adaptation and mitigation foci and the extent to which Planned greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions contribute to national and international climate objectives. To our knowledge, it is the first study of its kind as it does not rely on self-assessment (questionnaires or social surveys). Our results show that 35 % of European cities studied have no dedicated mitigation Plan and 72 % have no Adaptation Plan. No city has an Adaptation Plan without a mitigation Plan. One quarter of the cities have both an Adaptation and a mitigation Plan and set quantitative GHG reduction targets, but those vary extensively in scope and ambition. Furthermore, we show that if the Planned actions within cities are nationally representative the 11 countries investigated would achieve a 37 % reduction in GHG emissions by 2050, translating into a 27 % reduction in GHG emissions for the EU as a whole. However, the actions would often be insufficient to reach national targets and fall short of the 80 % reduction in GHG emissions recommended to avoid global mean temperature rising by 2 °C above pre-industrial levels. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Filipe Duarte Santos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Integrating a hydrological model into regional water policies: Co-creation of climate change dynamic adaptive policy pathways for water resources in southern Portugal
    Environmental Science and Policy, 2020
    Co-Authors: Luís Filipe Dias, Bruno Aparício, João Pedro Nunes, Inês Morais, Ana Lúcia Fonseca, Amandine Valérie Pastor, Filipe Duarte Santos

    Abstract:

    Irrigation is essential for a large part of Mediterranean agricultural systems, but scarce resources may cause conflicts between agricultural and domestic uses. These conflicts might be exacerbated by climate change, which could bring a drier climate and thus increase irrigation water demands while lowering supplies. These issues were addressed when designing a climate change Adaptation Plan for water resources in the Algarve region (southern Portugal), which was co-created between hydrologists and local stakeholders and policy-makers, by using the Dynamic Adaptive Policy Pathways (DAPP) approach to synthetize and communicate the results from hydrological modelling of future scenarios. The evolution of water availability and irrigation demands for key water assets in Algarve (southern Portugal) were simulated until 2100 for climate scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, using a modified version of Thornthwaite-Mather. The results show an increase in water stress, mainly in the RCP8.5 scenario. The results and need for Adaptation were discussed with local and regional decision-makers and other stakeholders, and a set of Adaptation measures was agreed upon. The discussed Adaptation measures were then modelled and integrated the design of tailor-made DAPP. Finally, decision-makers and stakeholders were presented with DAPP and selected the most suitable and political reliable Adaptation pathway that tackles projected climate change impacts in water resources until the end of the 21 st century. Stakeholders showed a strong preference for incremental and distributed small-scale measures, including the promotion of water use efficiency and landscape water retention, to large-scale measures such as wastewater recycling or new dams. A decrease in irrigation water use for agriculture was not considered socially desirable. Desalination was considered too costly for irrigation in the short term but kept in reserve in case other measures fail to keep water supplies at an acceptable level.

Fahim N. Tonmoy – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • from science to policy development of a climate change Adaptation Plan for the health and wellbeing sector in queensland australia
    Environmental Science & Policy, 2020
    Co-Authors: Fiona Armstrong, Fahim N. Tonmoy, Susan M. Cooke, David Rissik

    Abstract:

    Abstract The science of climate change and its impacts on health makes it clear that human health and wellbeing will be increasingly negatively impacted as a result of climate change. The health and wellbeing sector must respond to these growing pressures in order to continue to provide safe, quality care. Adaptation and mitigation policies need to be developed at different scales, including at a regional government level. Numerous challenges exist; for example, the necessity for collaboration between multiple agencies across scales, the tailoring of policies to the health issues specific to regions, and constraints on existing regional and local resources and adaptive capacities, to name a few. This paper presents a multi-disciplinary collaborative approach used to develop a regional scale climate Adaptation Plan with the health sector. Starting from a scientific understanding of climate change impact on the health sector in Queensland, Australia, the approach used an innovative engagement strategy to a) better understand awareness of relevant stakeholders about current and future climate change impact on the health of the population and on service provision, b) identify on-ground barriers to effective Adaptation faced by the sector stakeholders, c) identify opportunities and benefits which would arise from Adaptation, and d) identify what conditions or support stakeholders required to overcome those barriers, take advantage of opportunities, and achieve benefits from Adaptation. Analysis of these findings guided the development of specific policy directions for the sector. We found direct engagement between various key stakeholders such as health service providers (e.g. hospitals), critical infrastructure providers, academics, local government authorities, and sub-sectors such as aged care and early childhood care facilities, was a critical element of translating scientific evidence of climate change impacts on human health into a regional Adaptation policy for the health and wellbeing sector. The resulting policy, grounded in the reality and experience of health and wellbeing sector stakeholders, reflects their insights and concerns, and served to develop a level of sectoral ‘ownership’ (not ‘top-down’ imposition) which will be important for its successful ongoing development and implementation.

  • Human Health and Wellbeing Climate Change Adaptation Plan for Queensland
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Fiona Armstrong, Susan M. Cooke, David Rissik, Fahim N. Tonmoy

    Abstract:

    The Queensland Department of Environment and Science (DES) engaged the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF) and the Climate and Health Alliance (CAHA) to develop a Human Health and Wellbeing Climate Adaptation Plan (H-CAP) with the health, aged care and childcare sectors in Queensland. This is one of the eight sector Adaptation Plans, developed as part of Queensland Climate Adaptation Strategy (QCAS). The Plan was launched at the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital in Brisbane on the 11th September 2018 by the Minister for Health and Ambulance Services, the Honourable Dr Stephen Miles.
    The goal of the H-CAP is to support human health and wellbeing services to be innovative and resilient in managing the risks associated with a changing climate, and to harness the opportunities provided by responding to the challenges of climate change. It provides a preliminary climate change Adaptation framework and guidance for stakeholders across health care, aged care, and childcare services.