Adenosine Triphosphate Magnesium - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Adenosine Triphosphate Magnesium

The Experts below are selected from a list of 66 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Adenosine Triphosphate Magnesium – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Xavier Leverve – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care.
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl(2) as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. INVESTIGATIONS: These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl(2) as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl(2) may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    Background. Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl_2 as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. Investigations. These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. Conclusions. The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl_2 as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl_2 may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium dichloride during hyperdynamic porcine endotoxemia: effects on hepatosplanchnic oxygen exchange and metabolism.
    Critical Care Medicine, 2002
    Co-Authors: Pierre Asfar, Marek Nalos, Antje Pittner, Marc Theisen, Carole Ichai, Franz Ploner, Michael Georgieff, Can Ince, Uwe Bernd Brückner, Xavier Leverve
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium dichloride (ATP-MgCl2) on systemic and hepatosplanchnic hemodynamics, oxygen exchange, and energy metabolism over 24 hrs of hyperdynamic normotensive porcine endotoxemia. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study with repeated measures. SETTING: Investigational animal laboratory. SUBJECTS: Seventeen pigs were divided into two groups: eight animals receiving endotoxin served as a control group and nine animals received endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and ATP-MgCl2. INTERVENTIONS: Pigs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented. Endotoxemia was achieved by continuous intravenous infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Animals were resuscitated by hetastarch targeted to maintain mean arterial pressure of >75 mm Hg. Twelve hours after the start of the endotoxin infusion, ATP-MgCl2, or its vehicle, were administered for 12 hrs. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean arterial pressure was maintained in the control group because of a sustained increase in cardiac output achieved by fluid resuscitation, whereas ATP-MgCl2 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure because of further systemic vasodilatation. ATP-MgCl2 markedly increased portal venous flow. In contrast to the controls, hepatic arterial flow remained unchanged until the end of the experiment, despite the further increase in cardiac output. The ileal mucosal-arterial PCO2 gap (Delta PCO2) progressively increased (p

Pierre Asfar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care.
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl(2) as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. INVESTIGATIONS: These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl(2) as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl(2) may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    Background. Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl_2 as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. Investigations. These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. Conclusions. The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl_2 as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl_2 may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium dichloride during hyperdynamic porcine endotoxemia: effects on hepatosplanchnic oxygen exchange and metabolism.
    Critical Care Medicine, 2002
    Co-Authors: Pierre Asfar, Marek Nalos, Antje Pittner, Marc Theisen, Carole Ichai, Franz Ploner, Michael Georgieff, Can Ince, Uwe Bernd Brückner, Xavier Leverve
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium dichloride (ATP-MgCl2) on systemic and hepatosplanchnic hemodynamics, oxygen exchange, and energy metabolism over 24 hrs of hyperdynamic normotensive porcine endotoxemia. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study with repeated measures. SETTING: Investigational animal laboratory. SUBJECTS: Seventeen pigs were divided into two groups: eight animals receiving endotoxin served as a control group and nine animals received endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and ATP-MgCl2. INTERVENTIONS: Pigs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented. Endotoxemia was achieved by continuous intravenous infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Animals were resuscitated by hetastarch targeted to maintain mean arterial pressure of >75 mm Hg. Twelve hours after the start of the endotoxin infusion, ATP-MgCl2, or its vehicle, were administered for 12 hrs. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean arterial pressure was maintained in the control group because of a sustained increase in cardiac output achieved by fluid resuscitation, whereas ATP-MgCl2 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure because of further systemic vasodilatation. ATP-MgCl2 markedly increased portal venous flow. In contrast to the controls, hepatic arterial flow remained unchanged until the end of the experiment, despite the further increase in cardiac output. The ileal mucosal-arterial PCO2 gap (Delta PCO2) progressively increased (p

Marek Nalos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care.
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl(2) as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. INVESTIGATIONS: These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl(2) as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl(2) may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    Background. Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl_2 as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. Investigations. These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. Conclusions. The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl_2 as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl_2 may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium dichloride during hyperdynamic porcine endotoxemia: effects on hepatosplanchnic oxygen exchange and metabolism.
    Critical Care Medicine, 2002
    Co-Authors: Pierre Asfar, Marek Nalos, Antje Pittner, Marc Theisen, Carole Ichai, Franz Ploner, Michael Georgieff, Can Ince, Uwe Bernd Brückner, Xavier Leverve
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium dichloride (ATP-MgCl2) on systemic and hepatosplanchnic hemodynamics, oxygen exchange, and energy metabolism over 24 hrs of hyperdynamic normotensive porcine endotoxemia. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study with repeated measures. SETTING: Investigational animal laboratory. SUBJECTS: Seventeen pigs were divided into two groups: eight animals receiving endotoxin served as a control group and nine animals received endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and ATP-MgCl2. INTERVENTIONS: Pigs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented. Endotoxemia was achieved by continuous intravenous infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Animals were resuscitated by hetastarch targeted to maintain mean arterial pressure of >75 mm Hg. Twelve hours after the start of the endotoxin infusion, ATP-MgCl2, or its vehicle, were administered for 12 hrs. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean arterial pressure was maintained in the control group because of a sustained increase in cardiac output achieved by fluid resuscitation, whereas ATP-MgCl2 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure because of further systemic vasodilatation. ATP-MgCl2 markedly increased portal venous flow. In contrast to the controls, hepatic arterial flow remained unchanged until the end of the experiment, despite the further increase in cardiac output. The ileal mucosal-arterial PCO2 gap (Delta PCO2) progressively increased (p

Carole Ichai – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care.
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl(2) as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. INVESTIGATIONS: These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl(2) as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl(2) may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    Background. Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl_2 as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. Investigations. These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. Conclusions. The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl_2 as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl_2 may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium dichloride during hyperdynamic porcine endotoxemia: effects on hepatosplanchnic oxygen exchange and metabolism.
    Critical Care Medicine, 2002
    Co-Authors: Pierre Asfar, Marek Nalos, Antje Pittner, Marc Theisen, Carole Ichai, Franz Ploner, Michael Georgieff, Can Ince, Uwe Bernd Brückner, Xavier Leverve
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium dichloride (ATP-MgCl2) on systemic and hepatosplanchnic hemodynamics, oxygen exchange, and energy metabolism over 24 hrs of hyperdynamic normotensive porcine endotoxemia. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study with repeated measures. SETTING: Investigational animal laboratory. SUBJECTS: Seventeen pigs were divided into two groups: eight animals receiving endotoxin served as a control group and nine animals received endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and ATP-MgCl2. INTERVENTIONS: Pigs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented. Endotoxemia was achieved by continuous intravenous infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Animals were resuscitated by hetastarch targeted to maintain mean arterial pressure of >75 mm Hg. Twelve hours after the start of the endotoxin infusion, ATP-MgCl2, or its vehicle, were administered for 12 hrs. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean arterial pressure was maintained in the control group because of a sustained increase in cardiac output achieved by fluid resuscitation, whereas ATP-MgCl2 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure because of further systemic vasodilatation. ATP-MgCl2 markedly increased portal venous flow. In contrast to the controls, hepatic arterial flow remained unchanged until the end of the experiment, despite the further increase in cardiac output. The ileal mucosal-arterial PCO2 gap (Delta PCO2) progressively increased (p

Gebhard Fröba – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care.
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl(2) as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. INVESTIGATIONS: These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl(2) as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl(2) may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.

  • Adenosine TriphosphateMagnesium chloride: relevance for intensive care
    Intensive Care Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Marek Nalos, Pierre Asfar, Xavier Leverve, Carole Ichai, Peter Radermacher, Gebhard Fröba
    Abstract:

    Background. Despite aggressive resuscitation shock often results in multiple-organ failure characterized by increased energy demands of organs and decreased ability of effective energy production. The administration of ATP-MgCl_2 as a supportive measure has been investigated in various animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and septic shock. Investigations. These studies showed improvement in organ blood flow, microcirculation, energy balance, cellular and mitochondrial, functions and restoration of immune competence, ultimately leading to increased survival. Originally these effects were attributed to direct energy provision by the ATP-Mg complex, but the minute amount of ATP infused compared to the body’s ATP formation rate suggests that other mechanisms must be responsible for its beneficial properties such as stabilization of the cell membrane, phosphorylation of membrane proteins, decreased cell swelling, and improved microcirculatory perfusion. Conclusions. The experimental evidence currently available suggests the use of ATP-MgCl_2 as a therapeutic adjunct in patients with multiple-organ dysfunction. In addition, given the extremely short half-life which allows both rapid titration and control of the systemic hemodynamic response, for example, reduction in mean arterial pressure, ATP-MgCl_2 may be suitable as an alternative to other fast-acting vasodilators used for the management of acute pulmonary hypertensive crises and/or for the maintenance blood pressure during aortic cross-clamping.