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ADEOS

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2634 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Kohei Arai – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Atmospheric correction and vicarious calibration of ADEOS/AVNIR and OCTS
    Advances in Space Research, 2000
    Co-Authors: Kohei Arai

    Abstract:

    Abstract A field campaign for a vicarious calibration of ADEOS/AVNIR and OCTS was conducted. From the campaign, it is found that the radiance from ADEOS/AVNIR band 1 and 2 show small discrepancy of −3.5 and −7.2(%) while those from band 3 and 4 show large discrepancy about −20(%) between the estimated and satellite data. Meanwhile it is also found that the discrepancy for OCTS is not so large, around −4 to 5(%).

  • atmospheric correction and vicarious calibration of ADEOS avnir and octs
    Advances in Space Research, 2000
    Co-Authors: Kohei Arai

    Abstract:

    Abstract A field campaign for a vicarious calibration of ADEOS/AVNIR and OCTS was conducted. From the campaign, it is found that the radiance from ADEOS/AVNIR band 1 and 2 show small discrepancy of −3.5 and −7.2(%) while those from band 3 and 4 show large discrepancy about −20(%) between the estimated and satellite data. Meanwhile it is also found that the discrepancy for OCTS is not so large, around −4 to 5(%).

  • atmospheric correction and residual errors in vicarious cross calibration of avnir and octs both onboard ADEOS
    Advances in Space Research, 2000
    Co-Authors: Kohei Arai

    Abstract:

    Abstract A method for vicarious calibration of a solar reflectance radiometer through an estimation of reflectance of the test site with a high spatial-resolution radiometer onboard the same platform is proposed. Here we treat the case of the vicarious cross-calibration of ADEOS/OCTS (Advanced Earth Observing Satellite/Ocean Color and Temperature Scanner) with ADEOS/AVNIR (Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer). Error budget analysis for the proposed method shows that the vicarious calibration error with approximately 4.4% error can be achieved. There the contribution of the high spatial-resolution radiometer error is around 3.3%, while the cross calibration error between the solar reflectance (low resolution) radiometer and the high spatial resolution one is about 2.8%.

H. Shimoda – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • IGARSS – ADEOS II follow on program
    IEEE International IEEE International IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium 2004. IGARSS '04. Proceedings. 2004, 2004
    Co-Authors: H. Shimoda

    Abstract:

    ADEOS II was launched on Dec., 2002. However, after about 10 months operation, it has lost most of its power due to the solar paddle failure. The exact cause of the accident is not apparent at this time, JAXA is now considering to launch a satellite as a substitute of ADEOS II. Up to now, candidate sensors on board this satellite is 3, i.e. GLI follow on, AMSR follow on and SeaWinds follow on. The GLI F/O would be rather different from GLI. The main targets of GLI F/O are atmospheric aerosols, coastal zone and land. In order measure aerosols over both ocean and land, it would have ultra violet channels, as well as polarization and bidirectional observation capability. For, coastal zone and land observation, the IFOV of GLI F/O for these targets would be around 250 m. The instrument would be composed of several components. The shorter wavelength region would adopt push broom scanners, while long wave region would use a conventional whisk broom scanner. AMSR F/O would be very similar to AMSR on ADEOS II and AMSR-E on EOS-Aqua. SeaWinds F/O would be also similar to SeaWinds on ADEOS II with some modifications. There are two options on the orbit. One is the same to that of ADEOS II, i.e. around 800 km altitude. Another is a higher orbit to allow faster turn around. The target launch date is fiscal 2008

  • ADEOS II follow on program
    IGARSS 2004. 2004 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2004
    Co-Authors: H. Shimoda

    Abstract:

    ADEOS II was launched on Dec., 2002. However, after about 10 months operation, it has lost most of its power due to the solar paddle failure. The exact cause of the accident is not apparent at this time, JAXA is now considering to launch a satellite as a substitute of ADEOS II. Up to now, candidate sensors on board this satellite is 3, i.e. GLI follow on, AMSR follow on and SeaWinds follow on. The GLI F/O would be rather different from GLI. The main targets of GLI F/O are atmospheric aerosols, coastal zone and land. In order measure aerosols over both ocean and land, it would have ultra violet channels, as well as polarization and bidirectional observation capability. For, coastal zone and land observation, the IFOV of GLI F/O for these targets would be around 250 m. The instrument would be composed of several components. The shorter wavelength region would adopt push broom scanners, while long wave region would use a conventional whisk broom scanner. AMSR F/O would be very similar to AMSR on ADEOS II and AMSR-E on EOS-Aqua. SeaWinds F/O would be also similar to SeaWinds on ADEOS II with some modifications. There are two options on the orbit. One is the same to that of ADEOS II, i.e. around 800 km altitude. Another is a higher orbit to allow faster turn around. The target launch date is fiscal 2008

  • GCOM-A1 science plan [Global Change Observation Mission]
    IGARSS 2001. Scanning the Present and Resolving the Future. Proceedings. IEEE 2001 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (Cat. No.01CH, 2001
    Co-Authors: M. Suzuki, H. Shimoda, K. Shibasaki, T. Sano, S. Sobue, C. Ishida, T. Ogawa

    Abstract:

    GCOM-A1 is one of the satellite programs as follow-on of ADEOS and ADEOS-II. GCOM-A1 is under planning, which is targeting for the launch in 2007 (January-March). GCOM (Global Change Observation Mission) is a Japan’s new concept for systematic and long-term observation global environment and climate system from space. The mission concept of GCOM covers 15 years starting from ADEOS-II (February 2002 to 2007), GCOM-A1 and -B1 (2007-2012), and GCOM-A2 and -B2 (2012-17). Within this mission period, key geophysical parameters necessary to document and understand global changes and climate variability will be measured continuously, but it does not mean the same instruments will be deployed over 10 or 15 years. GCOM-A1 will be a satellite dedicated to measure parameters related to atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. It will carry three instruments, ODUS (Ozone Dynamics Ultraviolet Spectrometer) by NASDA, SOFIS (Solar Occultation FTS for Inclined orbit Satellite) by the Ministry of Environment of Japan, and SWIFT (Stratospheric Wind Interferometer For Transport studies) by ESA and CSA. ODUS is a satellite-borne, nadir-looking ultraviolet spectrometer for measuring total column ozone, SO/sub 2/, aerosols, NO/sub 2/, HCHO, BrO, and OClO. It will be NASDA’s core instrument for GCOM-A1. SOFIS is a successor of ADEOS/ILAS and ADEOS-II/ILAS-II by using the solar occultation technique in the infrared region. SWIFT is a successor of UARS/WINDII but using the 9 /spl mu/m ozone emission line to measure the stratospheric winds (

Haruhisa Shimoda – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • GCOM science overview
    2017 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2017
    Co-Authors: Haruhisa Shimoda

    Abstract:

    ADEOS II was launched on Dec., 2002. However, after about 10 months operation, it has lost most of its power due to the solar paddle failure. As a follow on of ADEOS II mission, JAXA is now planning GCOM mission which is composed of a series of satellites. They are now called GCOM-W and GCOM-C satellites. Both satellites are composed of 3 satellites with 5 year lifetime. Hence, 13 years of continuous observation can be assured with 1 year overlaps. The first satellite of GCOM-W was launched on 18, May, 2012 while the first one of GCOM-C will be launched in 2017. GCOM-W1 carries AMSR-2 (AMSR F/O). AMSR-2 is very similar to AMSR on ADEOS II and AMSR-E on EOS-Aqua with some modifications. GCOM-C1 will carry SGLI (GLI F/O). The SGLI will be rather different from GLI. The main targets of SGLI are atmospheric aerosols, coastal zone and land. In order to measure aerosols over both ocean and land, it will have an near ultra violet channel, as well as polarization and bi-directional observation capability. For, coastal zone and land observation, the IFOV of SGLI for these targets will be around 250m. The instrument will be composed of several components. The shorter wavelength region will adopt push broom scanners, while long wave region will use a conventional whisk broom scanner. The orbit of GCOM-W1 is A-train, while the orbit of GCOM-C1 will be similar to ADEOS II.

  • GCOM overview
    2014 IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2014
    Co-Authors: Haruhisa Shimoda

    Abstract:

    ADEOS II was launched on Dec., 2002. However, after about 10 months operation, it has lost most of its power due to the solar paddle failure. As a follow on of ADEOS II mission, JAXA is now planning GCOM mission which is composed of a series of satellites. They are now called GCOM-W and GCOM-C satellites. Both satellites are composed of 3 satellites with 5 year lifetime. Hence, 13 years of continuous observation can be assured with 1 year overlaps. The first satellite of GCOM-W was launched on 18, May, 2012 while the first one of GCOM-C will be launched in fiscal 2016. GCOM-W1 carries AMSR-2 (AMSR F/O). AMSR-2 is very similar to AMSR on ADEOS II and AMSR-E on EOS-Aqua with some modifications. GCOM-C1 will carry SGLI (GLI F/O). The SGLI will be rather different from GLI. The main targets of SGLI are atmospheric aerosols, coastal zone and land. In order to measure aerosols over both ocean and land, it will have an near ultra violet channel, as well as polarization and bi-directional observation capability. For, coastal zone and land observation, the IFOV of SGLI for these targets will be around 250m. The instrument will be composed of several components. The shorter wavelength region will adopt push broom scanners, while long wave region will use a conventional whisk broom scanner. The orbit of GCOM-W1 is A-train, while the orbit of GCOM-C1 will be similar to ADEOS II.

  • Overview of GCOM
    2013 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium – IGARSS, 2013
    Co-Authors: Haruhisa Shimoda

    Abstract:

    ADEOS II was launched on Dec., 2002. However, after about 10 months operation, it has lost most of its power due to the solar paddle failure. As a follow on of ADEOS II mission, JAXA is now planning GCOM mission which is composed of a series of satellites. They are now called GCOM-W and GCOM-C satellites. Both satellites are composed of 3 satellites with 5 year lifetime. Hence, 13 years of continuous observation can be assured with 1 year overlaps. The first satellite of GCOM-W was launched on 18, May, 2012 while the first one of GCOM-C will be launched in fiscal 2016. GCOM-W1 carries AMSR-2 (AMSR F/O). AMSR-2 is very similar to AMSR on ADEOS II and AMSR-E on EOS-Aqua with some modifications. GCOM-C1 will carry SGLI (GLI F/O). The SGLI will be rather different from GLI. The main targets of SGLI are atmospheric aerosols, coastal zone and land. In order to measure aerosols over both ocean and land, it will have an near ultra violet channel, as well as polarization and bi-directional observation capability. For, coastal zone and land observation, the IFOV of SGLI for these targets will be around 250m. The instrument will be composed of several components. The shorter wavelength region will adopt push broom scanners, while long wave region will use a conventional whisk broom scanner. The orbit of GCOM-W is A-train, while the orbit of GCOM-C will be similar to ADEOS II.