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Adhesive Bond Strength

The Experts below are selected from a list of 309 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Michael R Kessler – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • bisphenol e cyanate ester as a novel resin for repairing bmi carbon fiber composites influence of cure temperature on Adhesive Bond Strength
    Polymer, 2013
    Co-Authors: Amy Bauer, Michael R Kessler, Mahendra Thunga, Kristine Obusek, Mufit Akinc

    Abstract:

    A. Bauer, M. Thunga, K. Obusek, M. Akinc, M. R. Kessler: Bisphenol E Cyanate Ester as a Novel Resin for Repairing BMI/Carbon Fiber Composites: Influence of Cure Temperature on Adhesive Bond Strength, Polymer, 2013, 54 (15), 3994-4002. doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2013.05.030.

  • Bisphenol E cyanate ester as a novel resin for repairing BMI/carbon fiber composites: Influence of cure temperature on Adhesive Bond Strength
    Polymer, 2013
    Co-Authors: Amy Bauer, Mahendra Thunga, Kristine Obusek, Mufit Akinc, Michael R Kessler

    Abstract:

    A. Bauer, M. Thunga, K. Obusek, M. Akinc, M. R. Kessler: Bisphenol E Cyanate Ester as a Novel Resin for Repairing BMI/Carbon Fiber Composites: Influence of Cure Temperature on Adhesive Bond Strength, Polymer, 2013, 54 (15), 3994-4002. doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2013.05.030.

S. T. Burnage – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Ballistic testing of surface‐treated alumina and silicon carbide with improved Adhesive Bond Strength
    International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Andrew Harris, J A Yeomans, B. Vaughan, Paul Smith, S. T. Burnage

    Abstract:

    The laser treatment of ceramics can lead to increased concentrations of hydroxyl ions on the surface, resulting in improved Adhesive Bond Strength in quasi-static tests. Whether the improvement can be translated to armor applications is investigated here. The ballistic testing of composite-backed, surface treated and non-treated ‘control’ alumina and silicon carbide panels was undertaken. The failure locus of the ceramic to Adhesive/composite joint and the qualitative degree of damage were assessed. Laser surface treated samples performed better than control samples, with silicon carbide moving from single shot to multi-shot capability, thus giving significant advantages for the deployment of these materials.

  • surface preparation of silicon carbide for improved Adhesive Bond Strength in armour applications
    Journal of The European Ceramic Society, 2013
    Co-Authors: A J Harris, B. Vaughan, J A Yeomans, P. A. Smith, S. T. Burnage

    Abstract:

    Abstract Surface treatments of silicon carbide have been investigated with the aim of improving the Strength of the Bond between the ceramic and an epoxy Adhesive. Three surface conditions have been characterised; as-fired, air re-fired and KrF laser processed. A number of characterisation techniques have been used to determine the morphological and chemical changes that have occurred to the surface. Scanning electron microscopy of the re-fired and laser processed samples showed surfaces that appeared glassy, with the laser processed surface showing a different morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated both treatments had oxidised the surface and the laser processed surface also had a greater concentration of hydroxyl groups. The wettability of both surfaces had improved and the laser processed surface was found to be highly hydrophilic. Mechanical testing of joints prepared with this technique showed them to have the highest Strength in tension, with the locus of failure being cohesive.

  • Surface preparation of silicon carbide for improved Adhesive Bond Strength in armour applications
    Journal of the European Ceramic Society, 2013
    Co-Authors: A J Harris, B. Vaughan, J A Yeomans, P. A. Smith, S. T. Burnage

    Abstract:

    Surface treatments of silicon carbide have been investigated with the aim of improving the Strength of the Bond between the ceramic and an epoxy Adhesive. Three surface conditions have been characterised; as-fired, air re-fired and KrF laser processed. A number of characterisation techniques have been used to determine the morphological and chemical changes that have occurred to the surface. Scanning electron microscopy of the re-fired and laser processed samples showed surfaces that appeared glassy, with the laser processed surface showing a different morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated both treatments had oxidised the surface and the laser processed surface also had a greater concentration of hydroxyl groups. The wettability of both surfaces had improved and the laser processed surface was found to be highly hydrophilic. Mechanical testing of joints prepared with this technique showed them to have the highest Strength in tension, with the locus of failure being cohesive. © 2013 The Authors.

A J Harris – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • surface preparation of silicon carbide for improved Adhesive Bond Strength in armour applications
    Journal of The European Ceramic Society, 2013
    Co-Authors: A J Harris, B. Vaughan, J A Yeomans, P. A. Smith, S. T. Burnage

    Abstract:

    Abstract Surface treatments of silicon carbide have been investigated with the aim of improving the Strength of the Bond between the ceramic and an epoxy Adhesive. Three surface conditions have been characterised; as-fired, air re-fired and KrF laser processed. A number of characterisation techniques have been used to determine the morphological and chemical changes that have occurred to the surface. Scanning electron microscopy of the re-fired and laser processed samples showed surfaces that appeared glassy, with the laser processed surface showing a different morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated both treatments had oxidised the surface and the laser processed surface also had a greater concentration of hydroxyl groups. The wettability of both surfaces had improved and the laser processed surface was found to be highly hydrophilic. Mechanical testing of joints prepared with this technique showed them to have the highest Strength in tension, with the locus of failure being cohesive.

  • Surface preparation of silicon carbide for improved Adhesive Bond Strength in armour applications
    Journal of the European Ceramic Society, 2013
    Co-Authors: A J Harris, B. Vaughan, J A Yeomans, P. A. Smith, S. T. Burnage

    Abstract:

    Surface treatments of silicon carbide have been investigated with the aim of improving the Strength of the Bond between the ceramic and an epoxy Adhesive. Three surface conditions have been characterised; as-fired, air re-fired and KrF laser processed. A number of characterisation techniques have been used to determine the morphological and chemical changes that have occurred to the surface. Scanning electron microscopy of the re-fired and laser processed samples showed surfaces that appeared glassy, with the laser processed surface showing a different morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated both treatments had oxidised the surface and the laser processed surface also had a greater concentration of hydroxyl groups. The wettability of both surfaces had improved and the laser processed surface was found to be highly hydrophilic. Mechanical testing of joints prepared with this technique showed them to have the highest Strength in tension, with the locus of failure being cohesive. © 2013 The Authors.

  • Advances in Ceramic Armor VIII – Surface Preparation of Alumina for Improved Adhesive Bond Strength in Armor Applications
    Advances in Ceramic Armor VIII, 2012
    Co-Authors: A J Harris, B. Vaughan, J A Yeomans, Paul Smith, S. T. Burnage

    Abstract:

    Surface treatments of alumina have been investigated with the aim of increasing the Strength of the Bond created between the alumina and a toughened epoxy Adhesive. Four surface conditions have been assessed: as-fired; grit blasted; and krypton fluoride excimer laser treated under two sets of conditions. Compared with the as-fired surface, the grit blasted surface was rougher with poorer wettability, probably due to surface contamination. It was found that the laser treatments removed some of the sintering additives and caused rounding of the alumina grains, slightly increasing the surface roughness. Further, the laser treatment led to an increased surface energy and wettability, which has been linked tentatively to an observed increase in the hydroxyl groups on the surface. The Adhesive Bond Strength was assessed by testing joints in tension and shear. It was found that the laser treated surfaces demonstrated slight improvements in Bond Strength, with a cohesive failure of the Adhesive in tension for surfaces subjected to one of the two laser treatments, compared with failure at the interface for the as-fired, grit blasted and other laser treated samples in tension and for all samples in shear. Thus, it has been demonstrated that modifications to the surface of alumina can result in mechanical and chemical changes which affect roughness, wettability, Bond Strength and the locus of failure.