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Adhesive Bonding

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Göran Stemme – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • selective wafer level Adhesive Bonding with benzocyclobutene for fabrication of cavities
    Sensors and Actuators A-physical, 2003
    Co-Authors: Joachim Oberhammer, Frank Niklaus, Göran Stemme

    Abstract:

    Abstract In this work we describe an Adhesive wafer-level Bonding technique in which the Adhesive material is structured prior to Bonding. This technique can be used to create encapsulated cavities of different heights and sizes for surface micromachined devices directly in the Bonding layer. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) was used as the Adhesive Bonding material. The structuring of the BCB was done either by dry etching or by using photosensitive BCB. The process parameters needed to achieve a high bond quality while retaining the shapes of the structures in the intermediate Bonding layer have been investigated extensively. Both dry-etch and photosensitive BCB were found to be suitable for selective Adhesive Bonding. The dry-etch BCB must be soft-baked to a polymerisation degree of 50–60% to both withstand the patterning procedure and to be sticky enough for the following Bonding. Soft-baking is not necessary for the photosensitive BCB. For both types of BCB, good bond results have been achieved with a Bonding pressure of 2–3 bar and full curing of the BCB at 250 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, helium leak tests have been performed to investigate the suitability of selective Adhesive Bonding for applications with demands on quasi-hermetic seals. Cavities created with this Bonding techniques showed a leak rate between 1.4×10−8 and 4.8×10−8 kg m2 s−3 (1.4×10−7 and 4.8×10−7 mbar l s−1), which is 3–10 times higher than the limit of MIL-STD 883E. Therefore, this encapsulation technique does not provide sufficient gas-tightness to fulfill the requirements of hermetic electronic encapsulations.

  • new concept for cmos compatible fabrication of uncooled infrared focal plane arrays using wafer scale device transfer Bonding
    Proceedings of SPIE, 2001
    Co-Authors: Frank Niklaus, Edvard Kaelvesten, Göran Stemme

    Abstract:

    In this paper we present a new membrane transfer Bonding technology for fabrication of uncooled infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs). The technology consists only of low temperature processes, thus, it is compatible with standard integrated circuits (ICs). In the future this technology may allow infrared detectors with high temperature annealed, high performance thermistor materials to be integrated in CMOS based uncooled IRFPAs. The infrared detectors and the ICs are processed and optimized on different wafers. The wafer with the detectors (sacrificial detector-wafer) is bonded to the IC wafer (target wafer) using low temperature Adhesive Bonding. The detector-wafer is sacrificially removed by etching or by a combination of grinding and etching, while the detectors remain on the target wafer. The detectors are mechanically and electrically contacted to the target wafer. Finally, the Adhesive Bonding material is sacrificially removed. One of the unique advantages of this technology is the ability to integrate small, high temperature annealed detectors and ICs. We have applied membrane transfer Bonding to the fabrication of arrays of infrared bolometers with polycrystalline silicon thermistors. In principle, membrane transfer Bonding can be applied to the fabrication of any type of free-standing transducer including bolometers, ferroelectric detectors and movable micro-mirrors.

  • low temperature full wafer Adhesive Bonding of structured wafers
    Sensors and Actuators A-physical, 2001
    Co-Authors: Frank Niklaus, Peter Enoksson, Helene Andersson, Göran Stemme

    Abstract:

    In this paper, we present a technology for void free low temperature full wafer Adhesive Bonding of structured wafers. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) is used as the intermediate Bonding material. BCB bonds well with various materials and does not release significant amounts of byproducts during the curing process. Thus void-free bond interfaces can be achieved. Cured BCB coatings have an excellent resistance to a variety of acids, alkalines and solvents and a high transparency for light across the visible spectrum, which makes it a good material for fluidic, optical and packaging applications. We demonstrate the fabrication of fluidic structures and the embedding of protruding surface structures. An important finding is that the pre-cured BCB coatings are extremely deformable and have a liquid-like behaviour during Bonding.

Sebastiano Candamano – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • innovative high speed femtosecond laser nano patterning for improved Adhesive Bonding of ti6al4v titanium alloy
    Cirp Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Giovanna Rotella, Leonardo Orazi, Marco Alfano, Sebastiano Candamano, Iaroslav Gnilitskyi

    Abstract:

    Abstract In this work the effect of femtosecond Yb fiber laser irradiation on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy is assessed. An extensive experimental campaign is carried out to survey surface properties through the use of SEM, AFM, EDS mapping and contact angle measurements. It is shown that the generation of uniform nanoscale laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) allows to tailor surface properties and improves Adhesive Bonding with epoxy resin. The potential of the technique to improve the durability of the joints against accelerated aging is also evaluated.

  • innovative high speed femtosecond laser nano patterning for improved Adhesive Bonding of ti6al4v titanium alloy
    Cirp Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Giovanna Rotella, Leonardo Orazi, Marco Alfano, Sebastiano Candamano, Iaroslav Gnilitskyi

    Abstract:

    Abstract In this work the effect of femtosecond Yb fiber laser irradiation on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy is assessed. An extensive experimental campaign is carried out to survey surface properties through the use of SEM, AFM, EDS mapping and contact angle measurements. It is shown that the generation of uniform nanoscale laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) allows to tailor surface properties and improves Adhesive Bonding with epoxy resin. The potential of the technique to improve the durability of the joints against accelerated aging is also evaluated.

  • surface modification of ti6al4v alloy by pulsed yb laser irradiation for enhanced Adhesive Bonding
    Cirp Annals-manufacturing Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Giovanna Rotella, Marco Alfano, Sebastiano Candamano

    Abstract:

    Abstract This work presents a comprehensive experimental study on the effect of pulsed laser ablation (Yb-fiber) on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy substrates for Adhesive Bonding. The modification of surface morphology and chemistry is assessed by means of SEM, XRD and wettability measurements. In addition, surface and subsurface mechanical properties are probed through an extensive series of instrumented indentation tests. Based on the results of the aforementioned analyses, a suitable processing window is identified and Adhesive bonded T-peel joints are fabricated and tested. The obtained results indicate that pulsed laser irradiation can substantially improve the performance of Ti6Al4V/epoxy joints.

Frank Niklaus – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • selective wafer level Adhesive Bonding with benzocyclobutene for fabrication of cavities
    Sensors and Actuators A-physical, 2003
    Co-Authors: Joachim Oberhammer, Frank Niklaus, Göran Stemme

    Abstract:

    Abstract In this work we describe an Adhesive wafer-level Bonding technique in which the Adhesive material is structured prior to Bonding. This technique can be used to create encapsulated cavities of different heights and sizes for surface micromachined devices directly in the Bonding layer. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) was used as the Adhesive Bonding material. The structuring of the BCB was done either by dry etching or by using photosensitive BCB. The process parameters needed to achieve a high bond quality while retaining the shapes of the structures in the intermediate Bonding layer have been investigated extensively. Both dry-etch and photosensitive BCB were found to be suitable for selective Adhesive Bonding. The dry-etch BCB must be soft-baked to a polymerisation degree of 50–60% to both withstand the patterning procedure and to be sticky enough for the following Bonding. Soft-baking is not necessary for the photosensitive BCB. For both types of BCB, good bond results have been achieved with a Bonding pressure of 2–3 bar and full curing of the BCB at 250 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, helium leak tests have been performed to investigate the suitability of selective Adhesive Bonding for applications with demands on quasi-hermetic seals. Cavities created with this Bonding techniques showed a leak rate between 1.4×10−8 and 4.8×10−8 kg m2 s−3 (1.4×10−7 and 4.8×10−7 mbar l s−1), which is 3–10 times higher than the limit of MIL-STD 883E. Therefore, this encapsulation technique does not provide sufficient gas-tightness to fulfill the requirements of hermetic electronic encapsulations.

  • new concept for cmos compatible fabrication of uncooled infrared focal plane arrays using wafer scale device transfer Bonding
    Proceedings of SPIE, 2001
    Co-Authors: Frank Niklaus, Edvard Kaelvesten, Göran Stemme

    Abstract:

    In this paper we present a new membrane transfer Bonding technology for fabrication of uncooled infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs). The technology consists only of low temperature processes, thus, it is compatible with standard integrated circuits (ICs). In the future this technology may allow infrared detectors with high temperature annealed, high performance thermistor materials to be integrated in CMOS based uncooled IRFPAs. The infrared detectors and the ICs are processed and optimized on different wafers. The wafer with the detectors (sacrificial detector-wafer) is bonded to the IC wafer (target wafer) using low temperature Adhesive Bonding. The detector-wafer is sacrificially removed by etching or by a combination of grinding and etching, while the detectors remain on the target wafer. The detectors are mechanically and electrically contacted to the target wafer. Finally, the Adhesive Bonding material is sacrificially removed. One of the unique advantages of this technology is the ability to integrate small, high temperature annealed detectors and ICs. We have applied membrane transfer Bonding to the fabrication of arrays of infrared bolometers with polycrystalline silicon thermistors. In principle, membrane transfer Bonding can be applied to the fabrication of any type of free-standing transducer including bolometers, ferroelectric detectors and movable micro-mirrors.

  • low temperature full wafer Adhesive Bonding of structured wafers
    Sensors and Actuators A-physical, 2001
    Co-Authors: Frank Niklaus, Peter Enoksson, Helene Andersson, Göran Stemme

    Abstract:

    In this paper, we present a technology for void free low temperature full wafer Adhesive Bonding of structured wafers. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) is used as the intermediate Bonding material. BCB bonds well with various materials and does not release significant amounts of byproducts during the curing process. Thus void-free bond interfaces can be achieved. Cured BCB coatings have an excellent resistance to a variety of acids, alkalines and solvents and a high transparency for light across the visible spectrum, which makes it a good material for fluidic, optical and packaging applications. We demonstrate the fabrication of fluidic structures and the embedding of protruding surface structures. An important finding is that the pre-cured BCB coatings are extremely deformable and have a liquid-like behaviour during Bonding.