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Adhesive Wear

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Hendrik Van Brussel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • distinguishing the effects of Adhesive Wear and thermal degradation on the tribological characteristics of paper based friction materials under dry environment a theoretical study
    Tribology International, 2015
    Co-Authors: Agusmian Partogi Ompusunggu, Hendrik Van Brussel

    Abstract:

    Abstract Adhesive Wear and thermal degradation are the main aging mechanisms of paper-based friction materials. However, how these aging mechanisms affect the tribological characteristics of such materials is not fully understood. In this paper, the respective influences of the two aging mechanisms on the tribological characteristics of the friction materials are investigated through simulation. It is assumed that Adhesive Wear pre-dominantly affects the surface topography, while thermal degradation significantly affects the mechanical properties of the friction material. The simulation results show that the static friction coefficient and both normal and tangential contact stiffnesses increase due to Adhesive Wear, but decrease due to thermal degradation. These trends are qualitatively in agreement with experimental observations reported in the literature and our previous work.

  • influence of Adhesive Wear and thermal degradation on the frictional characteristics of paper based friction materials a comparative study
    International Scholarly Research Notices, 2013
    Co-Authors: Agusmian Partogi Ompusunggu, Hendrik Van Brussel

    Abstract:

    This paper discusses the effects of Adhesive Wear and thermal degradation
    on the dry frictional characteristics of paper-based friction materials against
    steel material. Some commercial paper-based friction materials typically used
    for clutch applications were subjected to Adhesive Wear and thermal degradation
    and the dry frictional characteristics were then measured at different
    states on a rotational tribometer. The experimental results reveal that both
    Adhesive Wear and thermal degradation have opposite effects on the frictional
    characteristics, where the static and kinetic coefficients of friction increase due
    to Adhesive Wear but decrease due to thermal degradation.

Ramin Aghababaei – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Micromechanical Origins of Adhesive Wear Mechanisms: From Asperity Smoothing to Debris Creation
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Ramin Aghababaei, D H Warner, Jeanfrancois Molinari

    Abstract:

    The Adhesive Wear process consists of several physical phenomena including plasticity and fracture which occur at different length and time scales. Despite the critical importance of the Adhesive Wear process in all engineering applications, it is still described via classical, yet fully empirical, models [1,2] since the microscopic principles have not been yet understood. Using novel coarse-grained atomistic simulations , we for the first time capture the debris formation during the Adhesive collision between surface asperities [3]. A systematic set of atomistic simulations reveals a characteristic length scale that controls the Adhesive Wear mechanisms (i.e. asperity smoothing versus debris formation) at the asperity level. This length scale provides a critical Adhesive junction size where bigger junctions produce Wear debris by fracture while smaller ones smooth out plastically. This finding explains why Wear debris has not been observed in previous atomistic simulations of Adhesive Wear, where the junction is too small and/or weak to form debris by fracture. Based on this observation, we formulate a simple analytical model that predicts the transition in the asperity-level Adhesive Wear mechanisms in both the simulation results and atomic force microscope (AFM) Wear experiments. We show that the proposed framework opens up a new research path to implicitly model and explore the Wear process and revisit classical models. References: [1] J. F. Archard (1953) Journal of Applied Physics [2] E. Rabinowicz (1961) Journal of Applied Physics [3] R. Aghababaei, D.H. Warner and J.F. Molinari (2016) Nature Communications

  • Adhesive Wear law at the single asperity level
    Journal of The Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kai Zhao, Ramin Aghababaei

    Abstract:

    Abstract Macroscopic Wear experiments in mid 1950s suggested an empirical Wear relation: Wear volume is linearly proportional to load and sliding distance. Recent asperity-level Wear experiments and simulations reported a breakdown of this law at the nanoscale, posing the fundamental question: Is the macroscopic Wear relation recoverable at the asperity level? Here we show that discrepant observations of Wear relations can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using systematic long-timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamic Wear simulations, we show that a linear Adhesive Wear law can be recovered at the single-asperity level only if the material removal is dominated by plastic deformation, confirming the longstanding Archard’s theoretical hypothesis. Alternatively, the relation breaks down when cleavage fracture or thermally activated atomic detachment governs the loss of material at the asperity level.

  • on the origins of third body particle formation during Adhesive Wear
    Wear, 2019
    Co-Authors: Ramin Aghababaei

    Abstract:

    Abstract The process of material removal during Adhesive sliding contact (i.e. Adhesive Wear) remains one of the least understood areas in the field of tribology. The main reason for this limited understanding is that, direct observation and modeling of third body formation during Adhesive contact present notorious challenges [1] . Recent coarse-grained 2D atomistic simulations [2] revealed the existence of a critical junction size, with larger asperity junctions forming third-body Wear particles and smaller junctions smoothing plastically. In this study, we examine the critical junction size model in a three-dimensional configuration. We present a 3D coarse-grained model potential and large scale 3D simulations of third-body particle formation in an idealized single asperity contact. Our simulations validate the prediction of the critical junction size model [2] for the formation of third-body Wear particles. Directions for future studies on computer modeling of Wear processes are discussed.

D K Dwivedi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adhesive Wear behaviour of cast aluminium silicon alloys overview
    Materials & Design, 2010
    Co-Authors: D K Dwivedi

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper describes the various technological aspects related to Adhesive Wear of cast aluminium–silicon (Al–Si) alloys. Number of hypothesis and theories proposed in the last two decades in order to explain the different phenomenon related with Wear and friction, and influence of test parameters (such as load, sliding speed, counter-surface) and work material properties (like mechanical and metallurgical) on tribological behaviour of aluminium–silicon alloys have been presented and discussed.

  • Adhesive Wear behaviour of cast aluminium–silicon alloys: Overview
    Materials & Design, 2010
    Co-Authors: D K Dwivedi

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper describes the various technological aspects related to Adhesive Wear of cast aluminium–silicon (Al–Si) alloys. Number of hypothesis and theories proposed in the last two decades in order to explain the different phenomenon related with Wear and friction, and influence of test parameters (such as load, sliding speed, counter-surface) and work material properties (like mechanical and metallurgical) on tribological behaviour of aluminium–silicon alloys have been presented and discussed.