Adjuvants - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Adjuvants

The Experts below are selected from a list of 324 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Eberhard Hildt – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Zusammensetzung und Wirkmechanismen von Adjuvanzien in zugelassenen viralen Impfstoffen
    Bundesgesundheitsblatt – Gesundheitsforschung – Gesundheitsschutz, 2019
    Co-Authors: Ralf Wagner, Eberhard Hildt

    Abstract:

    The immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines is largely governed by nature and the amount of antigen(s) included. Specific immune-stimulating substances, so-called Adjuvants, are added to vaccine formulations to enhance and modulate the induced immune response. Adjuvants are very different in their physicochemical nature and are primarily characterized by their immune-enhancing effects. In this report, Adjuvants that are components of vaccines licensed in the EU will be presented and their mode of action will be discussed. Aluminum salts have been used for almost a century as vaccine Adjuvants. In recent years numerous novel immune-stimulating substances have been developed and integrated into licensed human vaccines. These novel Adjuvants are not only intended to generally increase the vaccine-induced antibody titers, but are also aimed at modulating and triggering a specific immune response. The search for innovative Adjuvants was considerably stimulated during development of pandemic influenza vaccines. By using squalene-containing oil-in-water Adjuvants (namely AS03 and MF59), pandemic influenza vaccines were developed that were efficacious despite a significant reduction of the antigen content. The development of novel Adjuvants is a highly dynamic and essential area in modern vaccine design. Some years ago, vaccines for prevention of HPV-induced cervix carcinoma and hepatitis B were licensed that contained the toll-like receptor 4 agonist 3‑O-desacyl-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a detoxified LPS version, as the adjuvant. Quite recently, a herpes zoster vaccine was licensed in Europe with a combination of MPL and the saponin QS21 as adjuvant. This combination of immune enhancers is also used in the formulations of the same manufacturer’s malaria and hepatitis B vaccine.ZusammenfassungDie Immunogenität und Wirksamkeit von Impfstoffen werden in erster Linie von den enthaltenen Antigenen bestimmt. Die induzierte Immunantwort kann jedoch durch Zugabe von Wirkverstärkern in der Impfstoffformulierung, sog. Adjuvanzien, maßgeblich beeinflusst und gesteuert werden. Adjuvanzien sind stofflich sehr divers und durch ihren die Immunantwort verstärkenden Effekt gekennzeichnet. In diesem Beitrag werden Adjuvanzien, die Teil in der EU zugelassener Impfstoffe sind, vorgestellt und ihre immunologischen Wirkmechanismen beschrieben. Aluminiumsalze werden bereits seit 100 Jahren als Adjuvans eingesetzt. In jüngster Zeit wurde eine ganze Reihe neuartiger Adjuvanzien entwickelt und in zugelassene Impfstoffprodukte integriert. Viele der neuen Adjuvanzien führen nicht allein zu einer Erhöhung der impfstoffinduzierten Antikörpertiter, sondern zielen auch darauf ab, die Immunantwort in eine bestimmte Richtung zu lenken und gezielt zu modulieren. Die Suche nach innovativen Wirkverstärkern wurde wesentlich vorangetrieben bei der Entwicklung pandemischer Influenzaimpfstoffe. Durch Verwendung neuartiger Öl-in-Wasser-Emulsionen (Adjuvanzien MF 59 und AS03) gelang es, Pandemieimpfstoffe zu entwickeln, die trotz deutlich verringertem Antigengehalt wirksam sind. Die Entwicklung neuer Adjuvanzien ist ein sehr dynamischer und zentraler Aspekt des Impfstoffdesigns: Vor einigen Jahren wurden Impfstoffe gegen das HPV-induzierte humane Zervixkarzinom und Hepatitis B zugelassen, die den Toll-like-Rezeptor-4-Agonisten MPL (3-O-Desacyl-monophosphoryl Lipid A) als Adjuvansbestandteil enthalten. Jüngst wurde in Europa ein Impfstoff gegen Herpes Zoster zugelassen, der als Adjuvans eine Kombination aus MPL und dem Saponin QS21 enthält, die auch im Malaria- und im Hepatitis-B-Impfstoff des Herstellers zur Anwendung kommen.

  • Zusammensetzung und Wirkmechanismen von Adjuvanzien in zugelassenen viralen Impfstoffen
    Bundesgesundheitsblatt – Gesundheitsforschung – Gesundheitsschutz, 2019
    Co-Authors: Ralf Wagner, Eberhard Hildt

    Abstract:

    The immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines is largely governed by nature and the amount of antigen(s) included. Specific immune-stimulating substances, so-called Adjuvants, are added to vaccine formulations to enhance and modulate the induced immune response. Adjuvants are very different in their physicochemical nature and are primarily characterized by their immune-enhancing effects. In this report, Adjuvants that are components of vaccines licensed in the EU will be presented and their mode of action will be discussed. Aluminum salts have been used for almost a century as vaccine Adjuvants. In recent years numerous novel immune-stimulating substances have been developed and integrated into licensed human vaccines. These novel Adjuvants are not only intended to generally increase the vaccine-induced antibody titers, but are also aimed at modulating and triggering a specific immune response. The search for innovative Adjuvants was considerably stimulated during development of pandemic influenza vaccines. By using squalene-containing oil-in-water Adjuvants (namely AS03 and MF59), pandemic influenza vaccines were developed that were efficacious despite a significant reduction of the antigen content. The development of novel Adjuvants is a highly dynamic and essential area in modern vaccine design. Some years ago, vaccines for prevention of HPV-induced cervix carcinoma and hepatitis B were licensed that contained the toll-like receptor 4 agonist 3‑O-desacyl-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a detoxified LPS version, as the adjuvant. Quite recently, a herpes zoster vaccine was licensed in Europe with a combination of MPL and the saponin QS21 as adjuvant. This combination of immune enhancers is also used in the formulations of the same manufacturer’s malaria and hepatitis B vaccine. Die Immunogenität und Wirksamkeit von Impfstoffen werden in erster Linie von den enthaltenen Antigenen bestimmt. Die induzierte Immunantwort kann jedoch durch Zugabe von Wirkverstärkern in der Impfstoffformulierung, sog. Adjuvanzien, maßgeblich beeinflusst und gesteuert werden. Adjuvanzien sind stofflich sehr divers und durch ihren die Immunantwort verstärkenden Effekt gekennzeichnet. In diesem Beitrag werden Adjuvanzien, die Teil in der EU zugelassener Impfstoffe sind, vorgestellt und ihre immunologischen Wirkmechanismen beschrieben. Aluminiumsalze werden bereits seit 100 Jahren als Adjuvans eingesetzt. In jüngster Zeit wurde eine ganze Reihe neuartiger Adjuvanzien entwickelt und in zugelassene Impfstoffprodukte integriert. Viele der neuen Adjuvanzien führen nicht allein zu einer Erhöhung der impfstoffinduzierten Antikörpertiter, sondern zielen auch darauf ab, die Immunantwort in eine bestimmte Richtung zu lenken und gezielt zu modulieren. Die Suche nach innovativen Wirkverstärkern wurde wesentlich vorangetrieben bei der Entwicklung pandemischer Influenzaimpfstoffe. Durch Verwendung neuartiger Öl-in-Wasser-Emulsionen (Adjuvanzien MF 59 und AS03) gelang es, Pandemieimpfstoffe zu entwickeln, die trotz deutlich verringertem Antigengehalt wirksam sind. Die Entwicklung neuer Adjuvanzien ist ein sehr dynamischer und zentraler Aspekt des Impfstoffdesigns: Vor einigen Jahren wurden Impfstoffe gegen das HPV-induzierte humane Zervixkarzinom und Hepatitis B zugelassen, die den Toll-like-Rezeptor-4-Agonisten MPL (3-O-Desacyl-monophosphoryl Lipid A) als Adjuvansbestandteil enthalten. Jüngst wurde in Europa ein Impfstoff gegen Herpes Zoster zugelassen, der als Adjuvans eine Kombination aus MPL und dem Saponin QS21 enthält, die auch im Malaria- und im Hepatitis-B-Impfstoff des Herstellers zur Anwendung kommen.

Yehuda Shoenfeld – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • autoimmune inflammatory syndrome induced by Adjuvants asia 2013 unveiling the pathogenic clinical and diagnostic aspects
    Journal of Autoimmunity, 2013
    Co-Authors: Carlo Perricone, Yehuda Shoenfeld, Serena Colafrancesco, Roei David Mazor, Alessandra Soriano, Nancy Agmonlevin

    Abstract:

    In 2011 a new syndrome termed ‘ASIA Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants’ was defined pointing to summarize for the first time the spectrum of immune-mediated diseases triggered by an adjuvant stimulus such as chronic exposure to silicone, tetramethylpentadecane, pristane, aluminum and other Adjuvants, as well as infectious components, that also may have an adjuvant effect. All these environmental factors have been found to induce autoimmunity by themselves both in animal models and in humans: for instance, silicone was associated with siliconosis, aluminum hydroxide with postvaccination phenomena and macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome. Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to be involved in the onset of adjuvant-induced autoimmunity; a genetic favorable background plays a key role in the appearance on such vaccine-related diseases and also justifies the rarity of these phenomena. This paper will focus on protean facets which are part of ASIA, focusing on the roles and mechanisms of action of different Adjuvants which lead to the autoimmune/inflammatory response. The data herein illustrate the critical role of environmental factors in the induction of autoimmunity. Indeed, it is the interplay of genetic susceptibility and environment that is the major player for the

  • Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by Adjuvants (ASIA) 2013: Unveiling the pathogenic, clinical and diagnostic aspects
    Journal of Autoimmunity, 2013
    Co-Authors: Carlo Perricone, Serena Colafrancesco, Roei David Mazor, Alessandra Soriano, Nancy Agmon-levin, Yehuda Shoenfeld

    Abstract:

    In 2011 a new syndrome termed ‘ASIA Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants’ was defined pointing to summarize for the first time the spectrum of immune-mediated diseases triggered by an adjuvant stimulus such as chronic exposure to silicone, tetramethylpentadecane, pristane, aluminum and other Adjuvants, as well as infectious components, that also may have an adjuvant effect. All these environmental factors have been found to induce autoimmunity by themselves both in animal models and in humans: for instance, silicone was associated with siliconosis, aluminum hydroxide with postvaccination phenomena and macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome. Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to be involved in the onset of adjuvant-induced autoimmunity; a genetic favorable background plays a key role in the appearance on such vaccine-related diseases and also justifies the rarity of these phenomena. This paper will focus on protean facets which are part of ASIA, focusing on the roles and mechanisms of action of different Adjuvants which lead to the autoimmune/inflammatory response. The data herein illustrate the critical role of environmental factors in the induction of autoimmunity. Indeed, it is the interplay of genetic susceptibility and environment that is the major player for the

  • Adjuvants and autoimmunity
    Lupus, 2009
    Co-Authors: Eitan Israeli, Nancy Agmonlevin, M Blank, Yehuda Shoenfeld

    Abstract:

    Some Adjuvants may exert adverse effects upon injection or, on the other hand, may not trigger a full immunological reaction. The mechanisms underlying adjuvant adverse effects are under renewed scrutiny because of the enormous implications for vaccine development. In the search for new and safer Adjuvants, several new Adjuvants were developed by pharmaceutical companies utilizing new immunological and chemical innovations. The ability of the immune system to recognize molecules that are broadly shared by pathogens is, in part, due to the presence of special immune receptors called toll-like receptors (TLRs) that are expressed on leukocyte membranes. The very fact that TLR activation leads to adaptive immune responses to foreign entities explains why so many Adjuvants used today in vaccinations are developed to mimic TLR ligands. Alongside their supportive role, Adjuvants were found to inflict by themselves an illness of autoimmune nature, defined as ‘the adjuvant diseases’. The debatable question of sili…

Ralf Wagner – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Zusammensetzung und Wirkmechanismen von Adjuvanzien in zugelassenen viralen Impfstoffen
    Bundesgesundheitsblatt – Gesundheitsforschung – Gesundheitsschutz, 2019
    Co-Authors: Ralf Wagner, Eberhard Hildt

    Abstract:

    The immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines is largely governed by nature and the amount of antigen(s) included. Specific immune-stimulating substances, so-called Adjuvants, are added to vaccine formulations to enhance and modulate the induced immune response. Adjuvants are very different in their physicochemical nature and are primarily characterized by their immune-enhancing effects. In this report, Adjuvants that are components of vaccines licensed in the EU will be presented and their mode of action will be discussed. Aluminum salts have been used for almost a century as vaccine Adjuvants. In recent years numerous novel immune-stimulating substances have been developed and integrated into licensed human vaccines. These novel Adjuvants are not only intended to generally increase the vaccine-induced antibody titers, but are also aimed at modulating and triggering a specific immune response. The search for innovative Adjuvants was considerably stimulated during development of pandemic influenza vaccines. By using squalene-containing oil-in-water Adjuvants (namely AS03 and MF59), pandemic influenza vaccines were developed that were efficacious despite a significant reduction of the antigen content. The development of novel Adjuvants is a highly dynamic and essential area in modern vaccine design. Some years ago, vaccines for prevention of HPV-induced cervix carcinoma and hepatitis B were licensed that contained the toll-like receptor 4 agonist 3‑O-desacyl-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a detoxified LPS version, as the adjuvant. Quite recently, a herpes zoster vaccine was licensed in Europe with a combination of MPL and the saponin QS21 as adjuvant. This combination of immune enhancers is also used in the formulations of the same manufacturer’s malaria and hepatitis B vaccine.ZusammenfassungDie Immunogenität und Wirksamkeit von Impfstoffen werden in erster Linie von den enthaltenen Antigenen bestimmt. Die induzierte Immunantwort kann jedoch durch Zugabe von Wirkverstärkern in der Impfstoffformulierung, sog. Adjuvanzien, maßgeblich beeinflusst und gesteuert werden. Adjuvanzien sind stofflich sehr divers und durch ihren die Immunantwort verstärkenden Effekt gekennzeichnet. In diesem Beitrag werden Adjuvanzien, die Teil in der EU zugelassener Impfstoffe sind, vorgestellt und ihre immunologischen Wirkmechanismen beschrieben. Aluminiumsalze werden bereits seit 100 Jahren als Adjuvans eingesetzt. In jüngster Zeit wurde eine ganze Reihe neuartiger Adjuvanzien entwickelt und in zugelassene Impfstoffprodukte integriert. Viele der neuen Adjuvanzien führen nicht allein zu einer Erhöhung der impfstoffinduzierten Antikörpertiter, sondern zielen auch darauf ab, die Immunantwort in eine bestimmte Richtung zu lenken und gezielt zu modulieren. Die Suche nach innovativen Wirkverstärkern wurde wesentlich vorangetrieben bei der Entwicklung pandemischer Influenzaimpfstoffe. Durch Verwendung neuartiger Öl-in-Wasser-Emulsionen (Adjuvanzien MF 59 und AS03) gelang es, Pandemieimpfstoffe zu entwickeln, die trotz deutlich verringertem Antigengehalt wirksam sind. Die Entwicklung neuer Adjuvanzien ist ein sehr dynamischer und zentraler Aspekt des Impfstoffdesigns: Vor einigen Jahren wurden Impfstoffe gegen das HPV-induzierte humane Zervixkarzinom und Hepatitis B zugelassen, die den Toll-like-Rezeptor-4-Agonisten MPL (3-O-Desacyl-monophosphoryl Lipid A) als Adjuvansbestandteil enthalten. Jüngst wurde in Europa ein Impfstoff gegen Herpes Zoster zugelassen, der als Adjuvans eine Kombination aus MPL und dem Saponin QS21 enthält, die auch im Malaria- und im Hepatitis-B-Impfstoff des Herstellers zur Anwendung kommen.

  • Zusammensetzung und Wirkmechanismen von Adjuvanzien in zugelassenen viralen Impfstoffen
    Bundesgesundheitsblatt – Gesundheitsforschung – Gesundheitsschutz, 2019
    Co-Authors: Ralf Wagner, Eberhard Hildt

    Abstract:

    The immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines is largely governed by nature and the amount of antigen(s) included. Specific immune-stimulating substances, so-called Adjuvants, are added to vaccine formulations to enhance and modulate the induced immune response. Adjuvants are very different in their physicochemical nature and are primarily characterized by their immune-enhancing effects. In this report, Adjuvants that are components of vaccines licensed in the EU will be presented and their mode of action will be discussed. Aluminum salts have been used for almost a century as vaccine Adjuvants. In recent years numerous novel immune-stimulating substances have been developed and integrated into licensed human vaccines. These novel Adjuvants are not only intended to generally increase the vaccine-induced antibody titers, but are also aimed at modulating and triggering a specific immune response. The search for innovative Adjuvants was considerably stimulated during development of pandemic influenza vaccines. By using squalene-containing oil-in-water Adjuvants (namely AS03 and MF59), pandemic influenza vaccines were developed that were efficacious despite a significant reduction of the antigen content. The development of novel Adjuvants is a highly dynamic and essential area in modern vaccine design. Some years ago, vaccines for prevention of HPV-induced cervix carcinoma and hepatitis B were licensed that contained the toll-like receptor 4 agonist 3‑O-desacyl-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a detoxified LPS version, as the adjuvant. Quite recently, a herpes zoster vaccine was licensed in Europe with a combination of MPL and the saponin QS21 as adjuvant. This combination of immune enhancers is also used in the formulations of the same manufacturer’s malaria and hepatitis B vaccine. Die Immunogenität und Wirksamkeit von Impfstoffen werden in erster Linie von den enthaltenen Antigenen bestimmt. Die induzierte Immunantwort kann jedoch durch Zugabe von Wirkverstärkern in der Impfstoffformulierung, sog. Adjuvanzien, maßgeblich beeinflusst und gesteuert werden. Adjuvanzien sind stofflich sehr divers und durch ihren die Immunantwort verstärkenden Effekt gekennzeichnet. In diesem Beitrag werden Adjuvanzien, die Teil in der EU zugelassener Impfstoffe sind, vorgestellt und ihre immunologischen Wirkmechanismen beschrieben. Aluminiumsalze werden bereits seit 100 Jahren als Adjuvans eingesetzt. In jüngster Zeit wurde eine ganze Reihe neuartiger Adjuvanzien entwickelt und in zugelassene Impfstoffprodukte integriert. Viele der neuen Adjuvanzien führen nicht allein zu einer Erhöhung der impfstoffinduzierten Antikörpertiter, sondern zielen auch darauf ab, die Immunantwort in eine bestimmte Richtung zu lenken und gezielt zu modulieren. Die Suche nach innovativen Wirkverstärkern wurde wesentlich vorangetrieben bei der Entwicklung pandemischer Influenzaimpfstoffe. Durch Verwendung neuartiger Öl-in-Wasser-Emulsionen (Adjuvanzien MF 59 und AS03) gelang es, Pandemieimpfstoffe zu entwickeln, die trotz deutlich verringertem Antigengehalt wirksam sind. Die Entwicklung neuer Adjuvanzien ist ein sehr dynamischer und zentraler Aspekt des Impfstoffdesigns: Vor einigen Jahren wurden Impfstoffe gegen das HPV-induzierte humane Zervixkarzinom und Hepatitis B zugelassen, die den Toll-like-Rezeptor-4-Agonisten MPL (3-O-Desacyl-monophosphoryl Lipid A) als Adjuvansbestandteil enthalten. Jüngst wurde in Europa ein Impfstoff gegen Herpes Zoster zugelassen, der als Adjuvans eine Kombination aus MPL und dem Saponin QS21 enthält, die auch im Malaria- und im Hepatitis-B-Impfstoff des Herstellers zur Anwendung kommen.