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Sarah-jayne Blakemore – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Development of the social brain in Adolescence
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Sarah-jayne Blakemore
    Abstract:

    The brain has evolved to understand and interact with other people. We are increasingly learning more about the neurophysiological basis of social cogncognition and what is known as the social brain, that is, the network of brain regions involved in understanding others’ minds. This chapter focuses on how the social brain develops during Adolescence. Adolescence is a time characterised by change-hormonally, physically, psychologically and socially. In the past 15 years or so, research has started to focus on how the brain develops in Adolescence. Large-scale structural magnetic resoresonanceging studies have demonstrated development during Adolescence in white matter and grey matter volumes in several brain regions. Brain imaging studies of social cogncognition have shown changes between Adolescence and adulthood in activity in the social brain during a variety of social and affective tasks. Recent behavioural studies have shown that social cognitive behaviour and metacognitive ability also develop in Adolescence.

  • Development of the social brain in Adolescence
    Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 2012
    Co-Authors: Sarah-jayne Blakemore
    Abstract:

    The brain has evolved to understand and interact with other people. We are increasingly learning more about the neurophysiological basis of social cogncognition and what is known as the social brain, that is the network of brain regions involved in understanding others. This paper focuses on how the social brain develops during Adolescence. Adolescence is a time characterized by change – hormonally, physically, psychologically and socially. Yet until recently this period of life was neglected by cognitive neuroscience. In the past decade, research has shown that the brain develops both structurally and functionally during Adolescence. Large-scale structural MRI studies have demonstrated development during Adolescence in white matter and grey matter volumes in regions within the social brain. Activity in some of these regions, as measured using fMRI, also shows changes between Adolescence and adulthood during social cogncognition tasks. I will also present evidence that theory of mind usage is still developing late in Adolescence. Finally, I will speculate on potential implications of this research for society.

  • Development of the self-concept during Adolescence
    TRENDS COGN SCI, 2008
    Co-Authors: Sarah-jayne Blakemore
    Abstract:

    Adolescence is a period of life in which the sense of ‘self’ changes profoundly. Here, we review recent behavioural and neuroimaging studies on adolescent development of the self-concept. These studies have shown that Adolescence is an important developmental period for the self and its supporting neural structures. Recent neuroimaging research has demonstrated that activity in brain regions associated with self-processing, including the medial prefrontal cortex, changes between early Adolescence and adulthood. These studies indicate that neurocognitive development might contribute to behavioural phenomena characteristic of Adolescence, such as heightened self-consciousness and susceptibility to peer influence. We attempt to integrate this recent neurocognitive research on Adolescence with findings from developmental and social psychology.

Judith S. Brook – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Psychosocial antecedents and adverse health consequences related to substance use.
    American Journal of Public Health, 2008
    Co-Authors: Judith S. Brook, Naomi S. Saar, Chenshu Zhang, David W. Brook
    Abstract:

    Objectives. We examined the relationship between psychosocial antecedents in earlier Adolescence and problems related to substance use and related adverse health consequence (e.g., respiratory diseases, neurocognitive symptoms, and general malaise) in adulthood. We specifically focused on parent–child bonding in earlier Adolescence and internalizing behaviors in later Adolescence and their effects on problems related to substance use in the mid-20s and health problems in the mid-30s.Methods. Our team interviewed a community-based sample of 502 participants over a 30-year period (1975, 1983, 1985–1986, 1997, 2002, and 2005).Results. We found a strong relationship between internalizing behaviors in later Adolescence and adverse health consequences in the mid-30s. Internalizing behaviors in later Adolescence served as a mediator between low parent–child bonding in earlier Adolescence and later adverse health consequences. Problems related to substance use in the late 20s and early 30s were related directly t…

  • childhood adversities interpersonal difficulties and risk for suicide attempts during late Adolescence and early adulthood
    Archives of General Psychiatry, 2002
    Co-Authors: Jeffrey G Johnson, Patricia Cohen, Stephanie Kasen, Madelyn S Gould, Jocelyn Brown, Judith S. Brook
    Abstract:

    Background Data from a community-based longitudinal study were used to investigate the association between childhood adversities, interpersonal difficulties during Adolescence, and suicide attempts during late Adolescence or early adulthood. Methods A community sample of 659 families from Upstate New York was interviewed in 1975, 1983, 1985 to 1986, and 1991 to 1993. During the 1991-1993 interview, the mean age of the offspring was 22 years. Results Maladaptive parenting and childhood maltreatment were associated with an elevated risk for interpersonal difficulties during middle Adolescence and for suicide attempts during late Adolescence or early adulthood after age, sex, psychiatric symptoms during childhood and early Adolescence, and parental psychiatric symptoms were controlled statistically. A wide range of interpersonal difficulties during middle Adolescence were associated with risk for suicidal behavior after the covariates were controlled. Profound interpersonal difficulties during middle Adolescence mediated the association between maladaptive parenting or childhood maltreatment and suicide attempts during late Adolescence or early adulthood. Conclusions Maladaptive parenting and childhood maltreatment may be associated with a risk for severe interpersonal difficulties during Adolescence. These interpersonal difficulties may play a pivotal role in the development of suicidal behavior. Youths who are at an elevated risk for suicide may tend to be in need of mental health services that can help them to cope with an extensive history of profound interpersonal difficulties, beginning in childhood and continuing through Adolescence.

  • Childhood adversities associated with risk for eating disorders or weight problems during Adolescence or early adulthood.
    The American journal of psychiatry, 2002
    Co-Authors: Jeffrey G Johnson, Patricia Cohen, Stephanie Kasen, Judith S. Brook
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: A community-based prospective longitudinal study was conducted to investigate the association between childhood adversities and problems with eating or weight during Adolescence and early adulthood. METHOD: A community-based sample of 782 mothers and their offspring were interviewed during the childhood, Adolescence, and early adulthood of the offspring. Childhood maltreatment, eating problems, environmental risk factors, temperament, maladaptive parental behavior, and parental psychopathology were assessed during childhood and Adolescence. Eating disorders and problems with eating or weight in the offspring were assessed during Adolescence and early adulthood. RESULTS: A wide range of childhood adversities were associated with elevated risk for eating disorders and problems with eating or weight during Adolescence and early adulthood after the effects of age, childhood eating problems, difficult childhood temperament, parental psychopathology, and co-occurring childhood adversities were contro…

Katherine Shaver – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Longitudinal Links Between Perceptions of Adolescence and the Social Beliefs of Adolescents: Are Parents’ Stereotypes Related to Beliefs Held About and by Their Children?
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 2005
    Co-Authors: Janis E. Jacobs, Christina S. Chhin, Katherine Shaver
    Abstract:

    This study examined: (1) relations between parents’ prior stereotypes about Adolescence and their later beliefs about their own child during early and middle Adolescence, (2) relations between parents’ stereotypes and their own child’s behaviors during middle and late Adolescence, and (3) the role of congruency between mother’s and father’s beliefs about Adolescence in predicting their child’s behavior. The results revealed significant relations between parents’ prior stereotyped beliefs and their specific beliefs about their own children during the 7th and 10th grades. In addition, the relations between parents’ prior stereotypes and their adolescent children’s behaviors measured at 3 and 5 years later (10th and 12th grades) were estimated. Parents’ stereotypes about Adolescence significantly predicted their children’s behaviors in both 10th and 12th grades. Finally, the congruency between mothers’ and fathers’ stereotyped beliefs was significantly related to their children’s behaviors in the 10th and 12th grades. Parents who had consistent and strong stereotypes about Adolescence had adolescent children with more deviant peers than parents with consistent, but less-stereotyped views.

Suparna Choudhury – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Stephanie G. Craig – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Relation Between Eating- and Weight-Related Disturbances and Depression in Adolescence: A Review
    Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 2010
    Co-Authors: Jennine S. Rawana, Ashley S. Morgan, Hien Nguyen, Stephanie G. Craig
    Abstract:

    Depression often emerges during Adolescence and persists into adulthood. Thus, it is critical to study risk factors that contribute to the development of depression in Adolescence. One set of risk factors that has been recently studied in adolescent depression research is eating- and weight-related disturbances (EWRDs). EWRDs encompass negative cognitions related to one’s body or physical appearance, negative attitudes toward eating, and unhealthy weight control behaviors. However, there have been no comprehensive reviews of EWRDs and depression research that are contextualized within developmental frameworks of adolescent depression. Thus, this review will summarize research findings on the relation between EWRDs and depression in Adolescence using a cognitive vulnerability developmental framework. First, a brief overview of epidemiological findings on depression is provided in order to highlight the importance of examining depression in Adolescence. Second, a cognitive vulnerability developmental framework that can be used to conceptualize depression in Adolescence is described. Next, theories and findings on EWRDs and depression in Adolescence are summarized within this framework. Research limitations and suggestions for future research are provided. Finally, implications of this review related to the assessment, intervention, and prevention of depression in Adolescence are provided.