Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 9168 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Lawrence G Lenke – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • optimal surgical care for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis an international consensus
    European Spine Journal, 2014
    Co-Authors: Marinus De Kleuver, Lawrence G Lenke, Manabu Ito, Stephen J Lewis, Niccole M Germscheid, Steven J Kamper, Ahmet Alanay, Sigurd Berven, Kenneth M C Cheung, David W Polly

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    The surgical management of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) has seen many developments in the last two decades. Little high-level evidence is available to support these changes and guide treatment. This study aimed to identify optimal operative care for Adolescents with AIS curves between 40° and 90° Cobb angle.

  • genetic linkage localizes an Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and pectus excavatum gene to chromosome 18 q
    Spine, 2009
    Co-Authors: Christina A. Gurnett, Keith H. Bridwell, Lawrence G Lenke, Farhang Alaee, Anne M Bowcock, Lisa M Kruse, Timothy R Kuklo, Scott J Luhmann, Matthew B. Dobbs

    Abstract:

    Study Design
    A single large family, in which Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) and pectus excavatum (PE) segregate as an autosomal dominant condition, was evaluated. Genome-wide linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing were performed.

  • non neurologic complications following surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Volume, 2007
    Co-Authors: Leah Y Carreon, Lawrence G Lenke, Rolando M Puno, Stephen B Richards, Daniel J Sucato, John B Emans, Mark Erickson

    Abstract:

    Background: The reported prevalence of non-neurologic complications following corrective surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis ranges from 0% to 10%. However, most studies were retrospective evaluations of treatment techniques and did not focus solely on complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of non-neurologic complications following surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and to identify preoperative and operative factors that can increase this risk.

    Methods: The demographic data, medical and surgical histories, and prevalence of non-neurologic complications were reviewed in a prospective cohort of 702 patients who had undergone corrective surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and were consecutively enrolled in a multicenter database.

    Results: There were 556 female and 146 male patients. The mean age at the time of surgery was 14.25 years (range, eight to eighteen years). Five hundred and twenty-three patients had only posterior spinal surgery, 105 had only anterior spinal surgery, and seventy-four had a combined anterior and posterior procedure. There was a total of 108 complications in eighty-one patients, for an overall prevalence of 15.4%. There were ten respiratory complications (1.42%), six cases of excessive bleeding (0.85%), five wound infections (0.71%), and five cases of wound hematoma, seroma, or dehiscence (0.71%). Five patients, two with an early infection and three with late failure of the implant, required a reoperation.

    Factors that did not correlate with an increased prevalence of complications were age, body mass index, presence of cardiac or respiratory disease, previous surgery, pulmonary function, surgical approach, number of levels fused, graft material, use of a diaphragmatic incision, Lenke curve type, or region of the major curve. Although the number of patients with renal disease was small, these patients were 7.90 times more likely to have a non-neurologic complication. Increased blood loss as well as prolonged operative and anesthesia times were associated with a higher prevalence of non-neurologic complications.

    Conclusions: The prevalence of non-neurologic postoperative complications following surgery for correction of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in this study was 15.4%. The few factors noted to significantly increase the rate of complications include a history of renal disease, increased operative blood loss, prolonged posterior surgery time, and prolonged anesthesia time.

    Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level I. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Keith H. Bridwell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • genetic linkage localizes an Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and pectus excavatum gene to chromosome 18 q
    Spine, 2009
    Co-Authors: Christina A. Gurnett, Keith H. Bridwell, Lawrence G Lenke, Farhang Alaee, Anne M Bowcock, Lisa M Kruse, Timothy R Kuklo, Scott J Luhmann, Matthew B. Dobbs

    Abstract:

    Study Design
    A single large family, in which Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) and pectus excavatum (PE) segregate as an autosomal dominant condition, was evaluated. Genome-wide linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing were performed.

  • proximal junctional kyphosis in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis following segmental posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion minimum 5 year follow up
    Spine, 2005
    Co-Authors: Yongjung J Kim, Keith H. Bridwell, Lawrence G Lenke, Junghoon Kim, Samuel K Cho

    Abstract:

    Study Design.A retrospective study.Objective.To analyze the long-term proximal junctional change in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) following segmental posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion 5 years or more after surgery.Summary of Background Data.No study has concentrated on time-depende

  • pulmonary function in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis relative to the surgical procedure
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Volume, 2005
    Co-Authors: Yongjung J Kim, Keith H. Bridwell, Lawrence G Lenke, Kyoungnam L Kim, Karen Stegermay

    Abstract:

    Background: The long-term pulmonary function of patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis undergoing surgical correction is uncertain. To our knowledge, no report has demonstrated the changes in pulmonary function five years or more following spinal arthrodesis with use of modern segmental spinal instrumentation techniques for the treatment of all types of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in a similar Adolescent population.

    Methods: One hundred and eighteen patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis undergoing surgical treatment at a single institution were evaluated with pulmonary function tests to assess the absolute and percent-predicted value of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second at the preoperative examination and at regular intervals postoperatively. The patients were divided into four groups depending upon the surgical procedure: Group 1 comprised forty-nine patients who had posterior spinal arthrodesis with iliac crest bone graft; Group 2, forty-one patients who had posterior spinal arthrodesis with thoracoplasty; Group 3, sixteen patients who had open anterior spinal arthrodesis with a rib resection thoracotomy; and Group 4, twelve patients who had combined anterior and posterior spinal arthrodesis with a rib resection thoracotomy and iliac crest bone graft, respectively.

    Results: A comparison of absolute pulmonary function values from the preoperative and final follow-up evaluations demonstrated a significant (p < 0.0001) increase in both the forced vital capacity and the forced expiratory volume in one second for Group 1, whereas no change was seen in those values for Groups 2, 3, and 4. A comparison of the changes in the percent-predicted pulmonary function values demonstrated significant (p < 0.05) decreases in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second for Groups 2, 3, and 4, except for the latter value for Group 4, whereas Group 1 had no change. Conclusions: Patients who have had any type of chest cage disruption during the surgical treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis demonstrate no change in the absolute value and a significant decline in the percent-predicted value of pulmonary functions at five years following surgery. Chest cage preservation is recommended to maximize both absolute and percent-predicted pulmonary function values after surgical treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Jack C. Y. Cheng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
    Nature reviews. Disease primers, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jack C. Y. Cheng, Theodoros B Grivas, René M. Castelein, Winnie C. Chu, Aina J. Danielsson, Matthew B. Dobbs, Christina A. Gurnett, Keith D. Luk, Alain Moreau

    Abstract:

    Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) is the most common form of structural spinal deformities that have a radiological lateral Cobb angle – a measure of spinal curvature – of ≥10(°). AIS affects between 1% and 4% of Adolescents in the early stages of puberty and is more common in young women than in young men. The condition occurs in otherwise healthy individuals and currently has no recognizable cause. In the past few decades, considerable progress has been made towards understanding the clinical patterns and the three-dimensional pathoanatomy of AIS. Advances in biomechanics and technology and their clinical application, supported by limited evidence-based research, have led to improvements in the safety and outcomes of surgical and non-surgical treatments. However, the definite aetiology and aetiopathogenetic mechanisms that underlie AIS are still unclear. Thus, at present, both the prevention of AIS and the treatment of its direct underlying cause are not possible.

  • three dimensional characterization of torsion and asymmetry of the intervertebral discs versus vertebral bodies in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
    Spine, 2014
    Co-Authors: Tom P C Schlosser, René M. Castelein, Winnie C. Chu, Marijn Van Stralen, Rob C Brink, Tsz Ping Lam, Koen L Vincken, Jack C. Y. Cheng

    Abstract:

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE To compare the relative contribution of the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs with the 3-dimensional spinal deformity in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA There is an ongoing discussion about the causal role of skeletal growth processes in the etiopathogenesis of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis. Contradictory findings have been reported on the individual contribution of the vertebral bodies as compared with the discs to the coronal deformity. As far as we know, the true 3-dimensional deformity of the discs and vertebral bodies have not yet been described. METHODS High-resolution computed tomographic scans of 77 patients with severe Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis were included. Torsion and anterior-posterior and right-left asymmetry of each individual vertebral body and intervertebral disc were studied from T2 to L5, using semiautomatic analysis software. True transverse sections were reconstructed along the anterior-posterior and right-left axis of all endplates. These “endplate-vectors” were calculated semiautomatically, taking rotation and tilt into account. Torsion was defined as the difference in axial rotation between 2 subsequent endplates. Asymmetry was defined as the relative anterior-posterior or right-left height difference of the discs and the vertebrae. RESULTS There were at least 3 times more torsion, anterior overgrowth, and coronal wedging in the discs than in the vertebrae in the thoracic as well as in the (thoraco) lumbar curves (P<0.001). These values correlated significantly with the Cobb angle (r≥0.37; P<0.001). Anterior overgrowth and coronal asymmetry were greater in the apical regions whereas torsion was most pronounced in the transitional segments between the curves. CONCLUSION The discs contribute more to 3-D deformity than the bony structures, and there is significant regional variability. This suggests an adaptive rather than an active phenomenon. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 2.

  • Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
    The Lancet, 2008
    Co-Authors: Stuart L Weinstein, Jack C. Y. Cheng, Aina J. Danielsson, Lori A Dolan, Jose A Morcuende

    Abstract:

    Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) affects 1-3% of children in the at-risk population of those aged 10-16 years. The aetiopathogensis of this disorder remains unknown, with misinformation about its natural history. Non-surgical treatments are aimed to reduce the number of operations by preventing curve progression. Although bracing and physiotherapy are common treatments in much of the world, their effectiveness has never been rigorously assessed. Technological advances have much improved the ability of surgeons to safely correct the deformity while maintaining sagittal and coronal balance. However, we do not have long-term results of these changing surgical treatments. Much has yet to be learned about the general health, quality of life, and self-image of both treated and untreated patients with AIS.