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Adult Learning

The Experts below are selected from a list of 19263 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ross C Brownson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • integrating Adult Learning principles into training for public health practice
    Health Promotion Practice, 2009
    Co-Authors: Rebecca L Bryan, Matthew W Kreuter, Ross C Brownson

    Abstract:

    Providing training and planned Learning experiences to practitioners and community partners is fundamental to effective public health. The extent to which principles of Adult Learning currently guide such training is unknown and likely varies widely. The purpose of this article is to introduce five principles of Adult Learning and discuss how each can be applied in assessing trainee needs, planning and delivering training, and evaluating training processes and outcomes. Training guided by these principles should facilitate Adult Learning, collaborative efforts, and mutual respect between agencies, practitioners, and community partners.

Sharan B. Merriam – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Beyond Andragogy: New Directions in Adult Learning Theory
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Sharan B. Merriam

    Abstract:

    While andragogy is here to stay, we have moved beyond centering it at the heart of Adult Learning theory. Five other ways to understand Adult Learning will be presented in this symposium: transformative Learning, spirituality and Adult Learning, embodied knowing, the neuroscience of Adult Learning and narrative Learning. Adult Learning is at the heart of all Adult education practice. From literacy to continuing professional education, from the workplace to an art museum, from a college course to a yoga class, enabling the Learning of Adults is what holds an otherwise very diverse field together. For decades, Malcolm Knowles’s andragogy was how our field differentiated itself from childhood education and indeed, for many practitioners was the “window” into understanding Adults as learners. Andragogy became a template for designing instruction for Adult learners. It is still many newcomers first introduction to our field. While andragogy is here to stay, the purpose of this symposium is to present what is really new thinking in Adult Learning. We have moved beyond centering andragogy at the heart of our Adult Learning theory. Expanding our understanding of Adult Learning offers the potential for engaging more Adults in Learning, the common denominator across the many dimensions of Adult education practice. Five perspectives on Adult Learning will be presented in this symposium. First is a glimpse into some of the new thinking around transformational Learning. While not a new topic, emerging are a number of alternative conceptions of transformative Learning beyond Mezirow and Freire’s seminal work such as neurobiological, cultural-spiritual, race-centric and planetary views. The second presentation will be on spirituality and Adult Learning. The popular press has brought spirituality forward especially as it manifests in the workplace and higher education. How spirituality is being conceptualized as a component of Adult Learning will be explored in this second presentation. Because of the West’s focus on cognitive processing, the body as a site of Learning and knowing has until recently been ignored. The growing research base on embodied or somatic knowing is the topic of the third presentation. Embodied Learning is an alternate way of knowing that reconnects the mind and body. This connection between the mind and body is actually being reinforced by the latest developments in the neuroscience of Learning. The fourth presenter will explain how Learning, embodied experience, and reflection interact in making meaningful connections in the brain; in fact, imaging techniques have revealed how Learning changes the brain itself. The fifth topic is on narrative Learning. Human beings have always told stories to make sense of the world and to convey “truths” of the culture. What is new, is understanding how stories are a form of meaning-making. We learn through stories and creating a narrative to make sense of our experience is itself Learning.

  • Adult Learning Theory: A Review and an Update
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Sharan B. Merriam

    Abstract:

    There is no one definition, model, or theory that explains how or why Adults learn. Yet what we know about Adult Learning is what unites an otherwise disparate field of practice ranging from continuing professional education to basic literacy classes to on-the-job training. What we do have is a mosaic of principles and explanations that form an ever-expanding knowledge base of Adult Learning.  The first section of this article reviews three “foundational” theories of Adult Learning—andragogy, self-directed Learning, and transformative Learning followed by a discussion of the shift from these foundational theories to approaches that attend to the social and political context of Adult Learning.  The third section of this review of Adult Learning theory addresses the most recent research in holistic approaches to Adult Learning which includes the role of emotions, body and spirit in Learning.  Also discussed in this section is the growing attention to non-Western perspectives on Adult Learning.

  • Adult Learning theory for the twenty first century
    New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 2008
    Co-Authors: Sharan B. Merriam

    Abstract:

    Drawing from previous chapters in this volume, this final chapter proposes that Adult Learning theory is attending more to the various contexts where Learning takes place and to its multidimensional nature.

Rebecca L Bryan – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • integrating Adult Learning principles into training for public health practice
    Health Promotion Practice, 2009
    Co-Authors: Rebecca L Bryan, Matthew W Kreuter, Ross C Brownson

    Abstract:

    Providing training and planned Learning experiences to practitioners and community partners is fundamental to effective public health. The extent to which principles of Adult Learning currently guide such training is unknown and likely varies widely. The purpose of this article is to introduce five principles of Adult Learning and discuss how each can be applied in assessing trainee needs, planning and delivering training, and evaluating training processes and outcomes. Training guided by these principles should facilitate Adult Learning, collaborative efforts, and mutual respect between agencies, practitioners, and community partners.