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Anna-bella Failloux – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Mosquitoes of North-Western Europe as Potential Vectors of Arboviruses: A Review
    Viruses, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jean-philippe Martinet, Hubert Ferté, Anna-bella Failloux, Francis Schaffner, Jérôme Depaquit
    Abstract:

    Background: The intensification of trade and travel is linked to the growing number of imported cases of dengue, chikungunya or Zika viruses into continental Europe and to the expansion of invasive mosquito species such as Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus. Local outbreaks have already occurred in several European countries. Very little information exists on the vector competence of native mosquitoes for arboviruses. As such, the vectorial status of the nine mosquito species largely established in NorthWestern Europe (Aedes cinereus and Aedes geminus, Aedes cantans, Aedes punctor, Aedes rusticus, Anopheles claviger s.s., Anopheles plumbeus, Coquillettidia richiardii, Culex pipiens s.l., and Culiseta annulata) remains mostly unknown. Objectives: To review the vector competence of both invasive and native mosquito populations found in NorthWestern Europe (i.e., Luxembourg and Switzerland) for dengue, chikungunya, Zika, West Nile and Usutu viruses. Methods: A bibliographical search with research strings addressing mosquito vector competence for considered countries was performed. Results: Out of 6357 results, 119 references were related to the vector competence of mosquitoes in Western Europe. Eight species appear to be competent for at least one virus. Conclusions: Aedes albopictus is responsible for the current outbreaks. The spread of Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus increases the risk of the autochthonous transmission of these viruses. Although native species could contribute to their transmission, more studies are still needed to assess that risk.

  • Zika Virus, a New Threat for Europe?
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2016
    Co-Authors: Henri Jupille, Gonçalo Seixas, Laurence Mousson, Carla A Sousa, Anna-bella Failloux
    Abstract:

    Since its emergence in 2007 in Micronesia and Polynesia, the arthropod-borne flavivirus Zika virus (ZIKV) has spread in the Americas and the Caribbean, following first detection in Brazil in May 2015. The risk of ZIKV emergence in Europe increases as imported cases are repeatedly reported. Together with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and dengue virus (DENV), ZIKV is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Any countries where these mosquitoes are present could be potential sites for future ZIKV outbreak. We assessed the vector competence of European Aedes mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus) for the currently circulating Asian genotype of ZIKV.

Michael J Turell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • vector competence of selected african mosquito diptera culicidae species for rift valley fever virus
    Journal of Medical Entomology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Michael J Turell, Kenneth J Linthicum, Lisa A Patrican, Glyn F Davies, Alladin Kairo, Charles Bailey
    Abstract:

    Abstract Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in Egypt, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia have indicated the potential for this disease to spread from its enzootic areas in sub-Saharan Africa. Because little is known about the potential for most African mosquito species to transmit RVF virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus, RVFV), we conducted studies to determine the vector competence of selected African species of mosquitoes for this virus. All eight species tested [Aedes palpalis (Newstead), Aedes mcintoshi Huang, Aedes circumluteolus (Theobald), Aedes calceatus Edwards, Aedes aegypti (L.), Culex antennatus (Becker), Culex pipiens (L.), and Culex quinquefasciatus Say], were susceptible to infection, and all except Ae. calceatus, Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus transmitted RVFV by bite after oral exposure. Estimated transmission rates for mosquitoes that successfully transmitted RVFV by bite ranged from 5% for Ae. mcintoshi to 39% for Ae. palpalis for mosquitoes that fed on a hamster with a viremia ≥…

  • vector competence of north american mosquitoes diptera culicidae for west nile virus
    Journal of Medical Entomology, 2001
    Co-Authors: Michael J Turell, Monica L Oguinn, David J Dohm, James W Jones
    Abstract:

    We evaluated the potential for several North American mosquito species to transmit the newly introduced West Nile (WN) virus. Mosquitoes collected in the New York City metropolitan area during the recent WN virus outbreak, at the Assateague Island Wildlife Refuge, VA, or from established colonies were allowed to feed on chickens infected with WN virus isolated from a crow that died during the 1999 outbreak. These mosquitoes were tested ≈2 wk later to determine infection, dissemination, and transmission rates. Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Aedes atropalpus (Coquillett), and Aedes japonicus (Theobald) were highly susceptible to infection, and nearly all individuals with a disseminated infection transmitted virus by bite. Culex pipiens L. and Aedes sollicitans (Walker) were moderately susceptible. In contrast, Aedes vexans (Meigen), Aedes aegypti (L.), and Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) were relatively refractory to infection, but individual mosquitoes inoculated with WN virus did transmit virus by bite. Infected female Cx. pipiens transmitted WN virus to one of 1,618 F1 progeny, indicating the potential for vertical transmission of this virus. In addition to laboratory vector competence, host-feeding preferences, relative abundance, and season of activity also determine the role that these species could play in transmitting WN virus.

Melody Walker – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Parasitism of Aedes albopictus by Ascogregarina taiwanensis lowers its competitive ability against Aedes triseriatus.
    Parasites & vectors, 2021
    Co-Authors: Emma Stump, Lauren M Childs, Melody Walker
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND Mosquitoes are vectors for diseases such as dengue, malaria and La Crosse virus that significantly impact the human population. When multiple mosquito species are present, the competition between species may alter population dynamics as well as disease spread. Two mosquito species, Aedes albopictus and Aedes triseriatus, both inhabit areas where La Crosse virus is found. Infection of Aedes albopictus by the parasite Ascogregarina taiwanensis and Aedes triseriatus by the parasite Ascogregarina barretti can decrease a mosquito’s fitness, respectively. In particular, the decrease in fitness of Aedes albopictus occurs through the impact of Ascogregarina taiwanensis on female fecundity, larval development rate, and larval mortality and may impact its initial competitive advantage over Aedes triseriatus during invasion. METHODS We examine the effects of parasitism of gregarine parasites on Aedes albopictus and triseriatus population dynamics and competition with a focus on when Aedes albopictus is new to an area. We build a compartmental model including competition between Aedes albopictus and triseriatus while under parasitism of the gregarine parasites. Using parameters based on the literature, we simulate the dynamics and analyze the equilibrium population proportion of the two species. We consider the presence of both parasites and potential dilution effects. RESULTS We show that increased levels of parasitism in Aedes albopictus will decrease the initial competitive advantage of the species over Aedes triseriatus and increase the survivorship of Aedes triseriatus. We find Aedes albopictus is better able to invade when there is more extreme parasitism of Aedes triseriatus. Furthermore, although the transient dynamics differ, dilution of the parasite density through uptake by both species does not alter the equilibrium population sizes of either species. CONCLUSIONS Mosquito population dynamics are affected by many factors, such as abiotic factors (e.g. temperature and humidity) and competition between mosquito species. This is especially true when multiple mosquito species are vying to live in the same area. Knowledge of how population dynamics are affected by gregarine parasites among competing species can inform future mosquito control efforts and help prevent the spread of vector-borne disease.

  • Parasitism of Aedes albopictus by Ascogregarina taiwanensis lowers its competitive ability against Aedes triseriatus.
    , 2021
    Co-Authors: Emma Stump, Lauren M Childs, Melody Walker
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Mosquitoes are vectors for diseases that significantly impact the human population such as dengue, malaria and La Crosse virus. When multiple mosquito species are present, the competition between species may alter population dynamics as well as disease spread. Two mosquito species, Aedes albopictus and Aedes triseriatus, both inhabit areas where La Crosse virus is found. Infection of Aedes albopictus by the parasite Ascogregarina taiwanensis and Aedes triseriatus by the parasite Ascogregarina barretti can decrease a mosquito’s fitness, respectively. In particular, the decrease in fitness of Aedes albopictus occurs through the impact of Ascogregarina taiwanensis on female fecundity, larval development rate, and larval mortality and may impact its initial competitive advantage over Aedes triseriatus during invasion.Methods: We examine the effects of parasitism of gregarine parasites on Aedes albopictus and triseriatus population dynamics and competition with a focus on when Aedes albopictus is new to an area. We build a compartmental model including competition between Aedes albopictus and triseriatus while under parasitism of the gregarine parasites. Using parameters based on literature, we simulate the dynamics and analyze the equilibrium population proportion of the two species. We consider the presence of both parasites and potential dilution effects.Results: We show that increased levels of parasitism in Aedes albopictus will decrease the initial competitive advantage of the species over Aedes triseriatus and increase the survivorship of Aedes triseriatus. We find Aedes albopictus is better able to invade when there is more extreme parasitism of Aedes triseriatus. Furthermore, although the transient dynamics differ, dilution of the parasite density through uptake by both species does not alter the equilibrium population sizes of either species.Conclusions: Mosquito population dynamics are affected by many factors, such as abiotic factors (e.g. temperature and humidity) and competition between mosquito species. This is especially true when multiple mosquito species are vying to live in the same area. Knowledge of how population dynamics are affected by gregarine parasites among competing species can inform future mosquito control efforts and help prevent the spread of vector-borne disease.

  • Parasitism of Aedes Albopictus by Ascogregarina Taiwanensis Lowers Its Competitive Ability Against Aedes Triseriatus.
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Emma Stump, Lauren M Childs, Melody Walker
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Mosquitoes are carriers for many diseases that significantly impact the human population such as dengue, malaria and La Crosse virus. When multiple mosquito species are present, the competition between species may alter disease spread. Two mosquito species, Aedes albopictus and Aedes triseriatus, both inhabit areas where La Crosse EnceEncephalitis Virus is found. Infection of Aedes albopictus by the parasite Ascogregarina taiwanensis can decrease the mosquito’s fitness and impact its initial competitive advantage over Aedes triseriatus. The decrease in fitness occurs through the impact of Ascogregarina taiwanensis on female fecundity, larval development rate, and larval mortality. Methods: In this paper, we examine the effects of parasitism of Ascogregarina taiwanensis on Aedes albopictus and Aedes triseriatus population dynamics and competition. We build a compartmental model using parameters based on published literature, simulate the dynamics of the system, and analyze the effect of parasitism on competition between the mosquito species. Results: We show that increased levels of parasitism in Aedes albopictus will decrease the initial competitive advantage of the species over Aedes triseriatus and increase the survivorship of Aedes triseriatus. An understanding of how population dynamics are affected by this parasite can inform future mosquito control and mosquito-borne disease mitigation efforts. Conclusions: Mosquito population dynamics are affected by many factors, including abiotic factors (e.g. temperature and humidity) and competition between mosquito species. This is especially true when multiple mosquito species are vying to live in the same area. An understanding of mosquito population dynamics is vital to preventing spread of these diseases.

Jérémy Bouyer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Variation in the susceptibility of urban Aedes mosquitoes infected with a densovirus.
    Scientific reports, 2020
    Co-Authors: Aurélie Perrin, Anne-sophie Gosselin-grenet, Marie Rossignol, Carole Ginibre, Bethsabée Scheid, Christophe Lagneau, Fabrice Chandre, Thierry Baldet, Mylène Ogliastro, Jérémy Bouyer
    Abstract:

    Urban Aedes mosquitoes are vectors of many viruses affecting human health such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses. Insecticide resistance and environmental toxicity risks hamper the effectiveness of chemical control against these mosquito vectors. Alternative control methods, such as the use of mosquito-specific entomopathogenic viruses should be explored. Numerous studies have focused on evaluating the potential of different densoviruses species as biological control agents. However, knowledge on the extent of inter- and intra-specific variations in the susceptibility of Aedes mosquitoes to infection by different densoviruses remains insufficient. In this study, we compared infection and mortality rates induced by the Aedes albopictus densovirus 2 in different strains of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The two Aedes species were different in terms of susceptibility to viral infection. Under laboratory conditions, Aedes albopictus densovirus 2 appeared more virulent for the different strains of Aedes aegypti tested than for those of Aedes albopictus. In addition, we also found significant intra-specific variation in infection and mortality rates. Thus, although even if Aedes albopictus densoviruses could be powerful biocontrol agents used in the management of urban Aedes populations, our results also call into question the use of single viral isolate as biocontrol agents.

Chris Schmidt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • on the seasonal occurrence and abundance of the zika virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti in the contiguous united states
    PLOS Currents, 2016
    Co-Authors: Andrew J Monaghan, Cory W Morin, Daniel F Steinhoff, Olga V Wilhelmi, Mary H Hayden, Dale A Quattrochi, Michael H Reiskind, Alun L Lloyd, Kirk Smith, Chris Schmidt
    Abstract:

    Introduction: An ongoing Zika virus pandemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has raised concerns that travel-related introduction of Zika virus could initiate local transmission in the United States (U.S.) by its primary vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Methods: We employed meteorologically driven models for 2006-2015 to simulate the potential seasonal abundance of adult Aedes aegypti for fifty cities within or near the margins of its known U.S. range. Mosquito abundance results were analyzed alongside travel and socioeconomic factors that are proxies of viral introduction and vulnerability to human-vector contact. Results: Meteorological conditions are largely unsuitable for Aedes aegypti over the U.S. during winter months (December-March), except in southern Florida and south Texas where comparatively warm conditions can sustain low-to-moderate potential mosquito abundance. Meteorological conditions are suitable for Aedes aegypti across all fifty cities during peak summer months (July-September), though the mosquito has not been documented in all cities. Simulations indicate the highest mosquito abundance occurs in the Southeast and south Texas where locally acquired cases of Aedes-transmitted viruses have been reported previously. Cities in southern Florida and south Texas are at the nexus of high seasonal suitability for Aedes aegypti and strong potential for travel-related virus introduction. Higher poverty rates in cities along the U.S.-Mexico border may correlate with factors that increase human exposure to Aedes aegypti. Discussion: Our results can inform baseline risk for local Zika viruvirus transmission in the U.S. and the optimal timing of vector control activities, and underscore the need for enhanced surveillance for Aedes mosquitoes and Aedes-transmitted viruses.