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Kurt P. Rouser – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Oral Assessments of Student Learning in Undergraduate Aerospace Propulsion and Power Courses
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kurt P. Rouser
    Abstract:

    A purposeful approach has been taken to match teaching pedagogies (techniques), learning experiences, and assessment methods to various types of students learning in undergraduate Aerospace Propulsion courses at the junior-level at the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) and senior-level at Oklahoma State University (OSU), Stillwater, OK. Prior studies in the scholarship of teaching and learning have shown the benefits of matching assessment methods, as well as teaching pedagogies and learning experiences, to the types of students learning associated with desired educational outcomes. Literature suggests the best method for teaching and assessing student’ cognitive learning is through explanation and presentation. Oral assessments have been implemented at the Air Force Academy and Oklahoma State University to evaluate students’ cognitive learning in undergraduate Aerospace Propulsion and power courses. An oral midterm exam was performed to assess students’ acquisition knowledge and understanding of fundamental concepts, the type of learning occurring early in course lesson sequences. End-of-semester design project poster sessions and presentations served as summative oral assessments of students’ creative thinking, decision making, and professional judgment. Conversely, two written midterm exams and a final exam primarily focused on assessing students’ problem solving skills and less on comprehensive knowledge. Oral assessments also served as reflective thinking experiences that reinforced student learning. Student feedback on oral assessment methods was collected through surveys conducted after each assessment. Survey results not only revealed the effectiveness of using oral assessments but also on how to improve their design and implementation, including the use of information technology (IT) and broader curricular employment.

  • Oral Assessments of Student Learning in Undergraduate Aerospace Propulsion and Power Courses
    Volume 6: Ceramics; Controls Diagnostics and Instrumentation; Education; Manufacturing Materials and Metallurgy, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kurt P. Rouser
    Abstract:

    A purposeful approach has been taken to match teaching pedagogies (techniques), learning experiences and assessment methods to various types of student learning in undergraduate Aerospace Propulsion courses at junior-level at the United States Air Force Academy and at the senior-level at Oklahoma State University. Prior studies in the scholarship of teaching and learning have shown the benefits of matching assessment methods, as well as teaching pedagogies and learning experiences, to the types of student learning associated with desired educational outcomes. Literature suggests that the best method for teaching and assessing student cognitive learning is through explanation and presentation. Oral assessments have been implemented at the Air Force Academy and Oklahoma State University to evaluate student cognitive learning in undergraduate Aerospace Propulsion and power courses. An oral midterm exam was developed to assess student acquisition of subject matter knowledge and understanding of fundamental concepts, the type of learning occurring early in course lesson sequences. End-of-semester design project poster sessions and presentations were used as summative oral assessments of student creative thinking, decision making, and professional judgement. Conversely, two written midterm exams and a final exam primarily focused on assessing student problem solving skills and less on comprehensive knowledge. Oral assessments also served as reflective thinking experiences that reinforced student learning. Student feedback on oral assessment methods was collected through surveys conducted after each assessment. Survey results not only revealed the effectiveness of using oral assessments but also how to improve their design and implementation, including the use of information technology and broader curricular employment.

Abdollah A Afjeh – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Computational Simulation of Gas Turbines: Part 1—Foundations of Component-Based Models
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2000
    Co-Authors: John A Reed, Abdollah A Afjeh
    Abstract:

    Designing and developing new Aerospace Propulsion systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for alleviating this cost, but requires a flexible software simulation system capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary and multifidelity analysis methods, dynamically constructing arbitrary simulation models, and distributing computationally complex tasks. To address these issues, we have developed Onyx, a Java-based object-oriented domain framework for Aerospace Propulsion system simulation. This paper presents the design of a common engineering model formalism for use in Onyx. This approach, which is based on hierarchical decomposition and standardized interfaces, provides a flexible component-based representation for gas turbine systems, subsystems and components. It allows new models to be composed programmatically or visually to form more complex models. Onyx’s common engineering model also supports integration of a hierarchy of models which represent the system at differing levels of abstraction. Selection of a particular model is based on a number of criteria, including the level of detail needed, the objective of the simulation, the available knowledge, and given resources. The common engineering model approach is demonstrated by developing gas turbine component models which will be used to compose a gas turbturbineine model in Part II of this paper.

  • Computational Simulation of Gas Turbines: Part I — Foundations of Component-Based Models
    Volume 1: Aircraft Engine; Marine; Turbomachinery; Microturbines and Small Turbomachinery, 1999
    Co-Authors: John A Reed, Abdollah A Afjeh
    Abstract:

    Designing and developing new Aerospace Propulsion systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for alleviating this cost, but requires a flexible software simulation system capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary and multifidelity analysis methods, dynamically constructing arbitrary simulation models, and distributing computationally complex tasks. To address these issues, we have developed Onyx, a Java-based object-oriented domain framework for Aerospace Propulsion system simulation. This paper presents the design of a common engineering model formalism for use in Onyx. This approach, which is based on hierarchical decomposition and standardized interfaces, provides a flexible component-based representation for gas turbine systems, subsystems and components. It allows new models to be composed programmatically or visually to form more complex models. Onyx’s common engineering model also supports integration of a hierarchy of models which represent the system at differing levels of abstraction. Selection of a particular model is based on a number of criteria, including the level of detail needed, the objective of the simulation, the available knowledge, and given resources. The common engineering model approach is demonstrated by developing gas turbine component models which will be used to compose a gas turbturbineine model in Part II of this paper.Copyright © 1999 by ASME

  • An extensible object-oriented framework for distributed computational simulation of gas turbine Propulsion systems
    34th AIAA ASME SAE ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit, 1998
    Co-Authors: John A Reed, Abdollah A Afjeh
    Abstract:

    Designing and developing new Aerospace Propulsion systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for alleviating this cost, but requires a flexible software simulation system capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary and multifidelity analysis methods, dynamically constructing arbitrary simulation models, and distributing computationally complex tasks. To address these issues, we are developing Onyx, a Javabased object-oriented application framework for Aerospace Propulsion system simulation. The Onyx framework defines a common component object model which provides a consistent component interface for the construction of hierarchical object models. Because Onyx is a framework, component analysis models may be changed dynamically to adapt simulation behavior as required. A customizable visual interface provides highlevel symbolic control of Propulsion system construction and execution. For computationallyintensive analysis, components may be distributed across heterogeneous computing architectures and operating systems. This paper presents an overview of the design concepts and object-oriented architecture of Onyx.

J. Philip Drummond – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Methods for Prediction of High-Speed Reacting Flows in Aerospace Propulsion
    AIAA Journal, 2014
    Co-Authors: J. Philip Drummond
    Abstract:

    ESEARCH to develop high-speed airbreathing AerospacePropulsion systems was underway in the late 1950s. A majorpart of the effort involved the supersonic combcombustion ramjet, orscramjet, engine. Work had also begun to develop computationaltechniques for solving the equations governing the flow through ascramjet engine. However, scramjet technology and the computa-tional methods to assist in its evolution would remain apart foranother decade. The principal barrier was that the computationalmethods needed for engine evolution lacked the computertechnology required for solving the discrete equations resultingfromthenumericalmethods.Eventoday,computerresourcesremainamajorpacingitem inovercomingthisbarrier.Significantadvanceshave been made over the past 35 years, however, in modeling thesupersonic chemicallyreacting flowin ascramjet combustor. Toseehow scramjet development and the required computational toolsfinally merged, we briefly trace the evolution of the technology inboth areas.We begin with a review of the history of efforts to model thescramjet environment and thenconcentrate onmore recent activitiesthat lead to today’s computational capabilities. The NationalAerospace Plane (NASP) technology program provided strongmotivation for advancing the computational capabilities of thecountryinboththegovernmentandprivatesectors.RequiredgroundtestfacilitieswithsufficienttesttimeswerelimitedtoaroundMach8,and higher Mach numbers, achievable in pulse facilities, could onlybe maintained for the order of milliseconds. In addition, the numberof facility cycles available to parameterize a given engine flow-path were limited, and the facilities were expensive to operate.Computationalcapabilitieswereneededtofilleachoftheseareasthatexistedingroundtestfacilities.AlthoughtheNASPprogramwasnotsuccessful in developing a vehicle, it did spawn the development ofnewcomputational algorithms.TheHyper-XProgram,beginningin1995, revived high-speed computational research and development.A flight program is the catalyst that drives technology developmentandsynthesizesalloftheeffortsintoaunifiedtoolfordevelopmentofthe ultimate experiment, the flight of a hypersonic vehicle. Thegenesisofmostofthecurrentdaystate-of-the-artcomputationaltoolsfor scramjet research and development began with the Hyper-Xprogram. This paper attempts to cover this story from NASP andHyper-Xtothepresentday.Webeginwithabriefhistoryofscramjetdevelopment leading up to the NASP Program. Although this paperwill use the history of scramjet development as a roadmap for theevolution of computational tools, the reader interested in a moregenerallookatthehistoryshouldconsultthepapersbyBillig[1]andCurran[2]ontechnologyanditsissuesandHallion[3]onhypersonicsystems.FollowingpioneeringeffortsofFerri[4],Dugger[5],andWebberand MacKay [6] in the 1950s, a significant increase in research todevelopscramjetengineconceptsoccurredinthe1960s.In1965,theNASA Langley Research Center initiated the Hypersonic ResearchEngine (HRE) project to develop a high-speed air breathingtechnology for hypersonic cruise vehicles [7]. The goal of the HREproject was to flight test a regeneratively cooled, hydrogen-fueled pylon-mounted scramjet on the X-15 research airplane anddemonstrate design performance levels. The HRE did not reach theflight demonstration stage due to cancellation of the X-15 program,but the ground-based program did continue and resulted in thedevelopment and construction of two variable geometry enginemodels.Workwiththesemodelssignificantlyincreasedthescramjettechnology database to be applied in more advanced configurations.Following completion of the HRE project, attention moved toPropulsion concepts that would provide high performance wheninstalled on a vehicle. The original concept, a pylon-mounted HRE,would have resulted in excessive levels of external drag, and so thepylon was removed, and work began to highly integrate the engine

  • Development of Methods to Predict High-Speed Reacting Flows in Aerospace Propulsion Systems
    50th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition, 2012
    Co-Authors: J. Philip Drummond
    Abstract:

    This paper discusses the current state-of-the-art of computational capabilities for predicting reacting flows in high-speed Aerospace Propulsion systems with an emphasis on the flow fields in scramjets. We begin with a review of the history of efforts to model the scramjet environment and then concentrate on more recent activities that lead to today’s capabilities. The NASP technology program provided strong motivation for advancing the computational capabilities of the country in both the government and private sectors. Required ground test facilities with sufficient test times were limited to around Mach 8, and higher Mach numbers, achievable in pulse facilities, could only be maintained for the order of milliseconds. In addition, the number of facility cycles available to parameterize a given engine flow path were limited, and the facilities were expensive to operate. Computational capabilities were needed to fill both of these gaps. While the NASP program was not successful in developing a vehicle, it did spawn the development of new computational algorithms. The Hyper-X Program beginning in 1995 revived high-speed computational research and development. A flight program is the catalyst that drives technology development and synthesizes all of the efforts into a unified tool for development of the ultimate experiment, the flight of a hypersonic vehicle. The genesis of most of the current day state-of-the-art computational tools for scramjet research and development began with this program. This paper attempts to cover this story from NASP and Hyper-X to the present day.

G.s. Cross – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Progress in advanced instrumentation for next-generation Aerospace Propulsion control systems
    Proceedings of 1995 American Control Conference – ACC'95, 1
    Co-Authors: S. Barkhoudarian, G.s. Cross
    Abstract:

    An investigation of the instrumentation needs and requirements for the next generation of Aerospace Propulsion control systems is given. As Propulsion systems have become more advanced and complex and their performance requirements more demanding, new control concepts have been developed to enable the required system control. Over the last decade, new instrumentation technologies have emerged in a bid to meet the needs of Propulsion control systems for advanced jet, rocket, and hybrid engines. This paper will discuss these new needs and the advanced instrumentation technologies currently under development to help meet these needs. It will then identify advanced instrumentation technologies that are most crucial and should be developed further for the greatest overall benefit to emerging and future Propulsion control systems.

  • Advanced Instrumentation for Next Generation Aerospace Propulsion Control Systems
    Proceedings. The First IEEE Regional Conference on Aerospace Control Systems, 1
    Co-Authors: S. Barkhoudarian, G.s. Cross, Carl F. Lorenzo
    Abstract:

    New control concepts for the next generation of advanced air-breathing and rocket engines and hypersonic combined-cycle Propulsion systems are analyzed. The analysis provides a database on the instrumentation technologies for advanced control systems and cross matches the available technologies for each type of engine to the control needs and applications of the other two types of engines. Measurement technologies that are considered to be ready for implementation include optical surface temperature sensors, an isotope wear detector, a brushless torquemeter, a fiberoptic deflectometer, an optical absorption leak detector, the nonintrusive speed sensor, and an ultrasonic triducer. It is concluded that all 30 advanced instrumentation technologies considered can be recommended for further development to meet need of the next generation of jet-, rocket-, and hypersonic-engine control systems.

John A Reed – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Computational Simulation of Gas Turbines: Part 1—Foundations of Component-Based Models
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2000
    Co-Authors: John A Reed, Abdollah A Afjeh
    Abstract:

    Designing and developing new Aerospace Propulsion systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for alleviating this cost, but requires a flexible software simulation system capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary and multifidelity analysis methods, dynamically constructing arbitrary simulation models, and distributing computationally complex tasks. To address these issues, we have developed Onyx, a Java-based object-oriented domain framework for Aerospace Propulsion system simulation. This paper presents the design of a common engineering model formalism for use in Onyx. This approach, which is based on hierarchical decomposition and standardized interfaces, provides a flexible component-based representation for gas turbine systems, subsystems and components. It allows new models to be composed programmatically or visually to form more complex models. Onyx’s common engineering model also supports integration of a hierarchy of models which represent the system at differing levels of abstraction. Selection of a particular model is based on a number of criteria, including the level of detail needed, the objective of the simulation, the available knowledge, and given resources. The common engineering model approach is demonstrated by developing gas turbine component models which will be used to compose a gas turbine engine model in Part II of this paper.

  • Computational Simulation of Gas Turbines: Part I — Foundations of Component-Based Models
    Volume 1: Aircraft Engine; Marine; Turbomachinery; Microturbines and Small Turbomachinery, 1999
    Co-Authors: John A Reed, Abdollah A Afjeh
    Abstract:

    Designing and developing new Aerospace Propulsion systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for alleviating this cost, but requires a flexible software simulation system capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary and multifidelity analysis methods, dynamically constructing arbitrary simulation models, and distributing computationally complex tasks. To address these issues, we have developed Onyx, a Java-based object-oriented domain framework for Aerospace Propulsion system simulation. This paper presents the design of a common engineering model formalism for use in Onyx. This approach, which is based on hierarchical decomposition and standardized interfaces, provides a flexible component-based representation for gas turbine systems, subsystems and components. It allows new models to be composed programmatically or visually to form more complex models. Onyx’s common engineering model also supports integration of a hierarchy of models which represent the system at differing levels of abstraction. Selection of a particular model is based on a number of criteria, including the level of detail needed, the objective of the simulation, the available knowledge, and given resources. The common engineering model approach is demonstrated by developing gas turbine component models which will be used to compose a gas turbine engine model in Part II of this paper.Copyright © 1999 by ASME

  • An extensible object-oriented framework for distributed computational simulation of gas turbine Propulsion systems
    34th AIAA ASME SAE ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit, 1998
    Co-Authors: John A Reed, Abdollah A Afjeh
    Abstract:

    Designing and developing new Aerospace Propulsion systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for alleviating this cost, but requires a flexible software simulation system capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary and multifidelity analysis methods, dynamically constructing arbitrary simulation models, and distributing computationally complex tasks. To address these issues, we are developing Onyx, a Javabased object-oriented application framework for Aerospace Propulsion system simulation. The Onyx framework defines a common component object model which provides a consistent component interface for the construction of hierarchical object models. Because Onyx is a framework, component analysis models may be changed dynamically to adapt simulation behavior as required. A customizable visual interface provides highlevel symbolic control of Propulsion system construction and execution. For computationallyintensive analysis, components may be distributed across heterogeneous computing architectures and operating systems. This paper presents an overview of the design concepts and object-oriented architecture of Onyx.