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Lisa Feldman Barrett – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • context aware Experience sampling reveals the scale of variation in Affective Experience
    Scientific Reports, 2020
    Co-Authors: Katie Hoemann, Lisa Feldman Barrett, Zulqarnain Khan, Mallory J Feldman, Catie Nielson, Madeleine Devlin, Jolie B Wormwood, Karen S Quigley

    Abstract:

    Emotion research typically searches for consistency and specificity in physiological activity across instances of an emotion category, such as anger or fear, yet studies to date have observed more variation than expected. In the present study, we adopt an alternative approach, searching inductively for structure within variation, both within and across participants. Following a novel, physiologically-triggered Experience sampling procedure, participants’ self-reports and peripheral physiological activity were recorded when substantial changes in cardiac activity occurred in the absence of movement. Unsupervised clustering analyses revealed variability in the number and nature of patterns of physiological activity that recurred within individuals, as well as in the affect ratings and emotion labels associated with each pattern. There were also broad patterns that recurred across individuals. These findings support a constructionist account of emotion which, drawing on Darwin, proposes that emotion categories are populations of variable instances tied to situation-specific needs.

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  • Involvement of Sensory Regions in Affective Experience: A Meta-Analysis.
    Frontiers in psychology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ajay B. Satpute, Jian Kang, Kevin C. Bickart, Helena Yardley, Tor D. Wager, Lisa Feldman Barrett

    Abstract:

    A growing body of work suggests that sensory processes may also contribute to Affective Experience. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of Affective Experiences driven through visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and somatosensory stimulus modalities including study contrasts that compared Affective stimuli to matched neutral control stimuli. We found, first, that limbic and paralimbic regions, including the amygdala, anterior insula, pre-supplementary motor area and portions of orbitofrontal cortex were consistently engaged across two or more modalities. Second, early sensory input regions in occipital, temporal, piriform, mid-insular, and primary sensory cortex were frequently engaged during Affective Experiences driven by visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory and somatosensory inputs. A classification analysis demonstrated that the pattern of neural activity across a contrast map diagnosed the stimulus modality driving the Affective Experience. These findings suggest that Affective Experiences are constructed from activity that is distributed across limbic and paralimbic brain regions and also activity in sensory cortical regions.

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  • Sex differences in the neural correlates of Affective Experience
    Social cognitive and affective neuroscience, 2013
    Co-Authors: Yoshiya Moriguchi, Alexandra Touroutoglou, Bradford C. Dickerson, Lisa Feldman Barrett

    Abstract:

    People believe that women are more emotionally intense than men, but the scientific evidence is equivocal. In this study, we tested the novel hypothesis that men and women differ in the neural correlates of Affective Experience, rather than in the intensity of neural activity, with women being more internally (interoceptively) focused and men being more externally (visually) focused. Adult men (n ¼ 17) and women (n ¼ 17) completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging study while viewing Affectively potent images and rating their moment-to-moment feelings of subjective arousal. We found that men and women do not differ overall in their intensity of moment-to-moment Affective Experiences when viewing evocative images, but instead, as predicted, women showed a greater association between the momentary arousal ratings and neural responses in the anterior insula cortex, which represents bodily sensations, whereas men showed stronger correlations between their momentary arousal ratings and neural responses in the visual cortex. Men also showed enhanced functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior insula cortex and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, which constitutes the circuitry involved with regulating shifts of attention to the world. These results demonstrate that the same Affective Experience is

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Jennifer A Silvers – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spatial and temporal cortical variability track with age and Affective Experience during emotion regulation in youth
    Developmental Psychology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Joao Guassi F Moreira, Katie A Mclaughlin, Jennifer A Silvers

    Abstract:

    Author(s): Guassi Moreira, Joao F; McLaughlin, Katie A; Silvers, Jennifer A | Abstract: Variability is a fundamental feature of human brain activity that is particularly pronounced during development. However, developmental neuroimaging research has only recently begun to move beyond characterizing brain function exclusively in terms of magnitude of neural activation to incorporate estimates of variability. No prior neuroimaging study has done so in the domain of emotion regulation. We investigated how age and Affective Experiences relate to spatial and temporal variability in neural activity during emotion regulation. In the current study, 70 typically developing youth aged 8 to 17 years completed a cognitive reappraisal task of emotion regulation while undergoing functional MRI. Estimates of spatial and temporal variability during regulation were calculated across a network of brain regions, defined a priori, and were then related to age and Affective Experiences. Results showed that increasing age was associated with reduced spatial and temporal variability in a set of frontoparietal regions (e.g., dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, superior parietal lobule) known to be involved in effortful emotion regulation. In addition, youth who reported less negative affect during regulation had less spatial variability in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, which has previously been linked to cognitive reappraisal. We interpret age-related reductions in spatial and temporal variability as implying neural specialization. These results suggest that the development of emotion regulation is undergirded by a process of neural specialization and open a host of possibilities for incorporating neural variability into the study of emotion regulation development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

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  • spatial and temporal cortical variability track with age and Affective Experience during emotion regulation in youth
    Developmental Psychology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Joao Guassi F Moreira, Katie A Mclaughlin, Jennifer A Silvers

    Abstract:

    Variability is a fundamental feature of human brain activity that is particularly pronounced during development. However, developmental neuroimaging research has only recently begun to move beyond characterizing brain function exclusively in terms of magnitude of neural activation to incorporate estimates of variability. No prior neuroimaging study has done so in the domain of emotion regulation. We investigated how age and Affective Experiences relate to spatial and temporal variability in neural activity during emotion regulation. In the current study, 70 typically developing youth aged 8 to 17 years completed a cognitive reappraisal task of emotion regulation while undergoing functional MRI. Estimates of spatial and temporal variability during regulation were calculated across a network of brain regions, defined a priori, and were then related to age and Affective Experiences. Results showed that increasing age was associated with reduced spatial and temporal variability in a set of frontoparietal regions (e.g., dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, superior parietal lobule) known to be involved in effortful emotion regulation. In addition, youth who reported less negative affect during regulation had less spatial variability in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, which has previously been linked to cognitive reappraisal. We interpret age-related reductions in spatial and temporal variability as implying neural specialization. These results suggest that the development of emotion regulation is undergirded by a process of neural specialization and open a host of possibilities for incorporating neural variability into the study of emotion regulation development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

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  • spatial and temporal cortical variability track with age and Affective Experience during emotion regulation in youth
    bioRxiv, 2018
    Co-Authors: Joao Guassi F Moreira, Katie A Mclaughlin, Jennifer A Silvers

    Abstract:

    Variability is a fundamental feature of human brain activity that is particularly pronounced during development. However, developmental neuroimaging research has only recently begun to move beyond characterizing brain function across development exclusively in terms of magnitude of neural activation to incorporating estimates of variability. No prior neuroimaging study has done so in the domain of emotion regulation. We investigated how age and Affective Experiences influence spatial and temporal variability in neural activity during emotion regulation. In the current study, 70 typically developing youth aged 8-17 years completed a cognitive reappraisal task of emotion regulation while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Estimates of spatial and temporal variability during emotion regulation were calculated across a network of brain regions, defined a priori, and were then related to age and Affective Experiences. Results showed that increasing age was associated with reduced spatial and temporal variability in a set of frontoparietal regions (e.g., dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, superior parietal lobule) known to be involved in effortful emotion regulation. In addition, youth who reported less negative affect during emotion regulation had less spatial variability in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. We interpret age-related reductions in spatial and temporal variability as evidence of neural specialization. These results imply that the development of emotion regulation is undergirded by a process of neural specialization and open up a host of possibilities for incorporating neural variability into the study of emotion regulation development.

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Joao Guassi F Moreira – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spatial and temporal cortical variability track with age and Affective Experience during emotion regulation in youth
    Developmental Psychology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Joao Guassi F Moreira, Katie A Mclaughlin, Jennifer A Silvers

    Abstract:

    Author(s): Guassi Moreira, Joao F; McLaughlin, Katie A; Silvers, Jennifer A | Abstract: Variability is a fundamental feature of human brain activity that is particularly pronounced during development. However, developmental neuroimaging research has only recently begun to move beyond characterizing brain function exclusively in terms of magnitude of neural activation to incorporate estimates of variability. No prior neuroimaging study has done so in the domain of emotion regulation. We investigated how age and Affective Experiences relate to spatial and temporal variability in neural activity during emotion regulation. In the current study, 70 typically developing youth aged 8 to 17 years completed a cognitive reappraisal task of emotion regulation while undergoing functional MRI. Estimates of spatial and temporal variability during regulation were calculated across a network of brain regions, defined a priori, and were then related to age and Affective Experiences. Results showed that increasing age was associated with reduced spatial and temporal variability in a set of frontoparietal regions (e.g., dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, superior parietal lobule) known to be involved in effortful emotion regulation. In addition, youth who reported less negative affect during regulation had less spatial variability in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, which has previously been linked to cognitive reappraisal. We interpret age-related reductions in spatial and temporal variability as implying neural specialization. These results suggest that the development of emotion regulation is undergirded by a process of neural specialization and open a host of possibilities for incorporating neural variability into the study of emotion regulation development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

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  • spatial and temporal cortical variability track with age and Affective Experience during emotion regulation in youth
    Developmental Psychology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Joao Guassi F Moreira, Katie A Mclaughlin, Jennifer A Silvers

    Abstract:

    Variability is a fundamental feature of human brain activity that is particularly pronounced during development. However, developmental neuroimaging research has only recently begun to move beyond characterizing brain function exclusively in terms of magnitude of neural activation to incorporate estimates of variability. No prior neuroimaging study has done so in the domain of emotion regulation. We investigated how age and Affective Experiences relate to spatial and temporal variability in neural activity during emotion regulation. In the current study, 70 typically developing youth aged 8 to 17 years completed a cognitive reappraisal task of emotion regulation while undergoing functional MRI. Estimates of spatial and temporal variability during regulation were calculated across a network of brain regions, defined a priori, and were then related to age and Affective Experiences. Results showed that increasing age was associated with reduced spatial and temporal variability in a set of frontoparietal regions (e.g., dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, superior parietal lobule) known to be involved in effortful emotion regulation. In addition, youth who reported less negative affect during regulation had less spatial variability in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, which has previously been linked to cognitive reappraisal. We interpret age-related reductions in spatial and temporal variability as implying neural specialization. These results suggest that the development of emotion regulation is undergirded by a process of neural specialization and open a host of possibilities for incorporating neural variability into the study of emotion regulation development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

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  • spatial and temporal cortical variability track with age and Affective Experience during emotion regulation in youth
    bioRxiv, 2018
    Co-Authors: Joao Guassi F Moreira, Katie A Mclaughlin, Jennifer A Silvers

    Abstract:

    Variability is a fundamental feature of human brain activity that is particularly pronounced during development. However, developmental neuroimaging research has only recently begun to move beyond characterizing brain function across development exclusively in terms of magnitude of neural activation to incorporating estimates of variability. No prior neuroimaging study has done so in the domain of emotion regulation. We investigated how age and Affective Experiences influence spatial and temporal variability in neural activity during emotion regulation. In the current study, 70 typically developing youth aged 8-17 years completed a cognitive reappraisal task of emotion regulation while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Estimates of spatial and temporal variability during emotion regulation were calculated across a network of brain regions, defined a priori, and were then related to age and Affective Experiences. Results showed that increasing age was associated with reduced spatial and temporal variability in a set of frontoparietal regions (e.g., dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, superior parietal lobule) known to be involved in effortful emotion regulation. In addition, youth who reported less negative affect during emotion regulation had less spatial variability in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. We interpret age-related reductions in spatial and temporal variability as evidence of neural specialization. These results imply that the development of emotion regulation is undergirded by a process of neural specialization and open up a host of possibilities for incorporating neural variability into the study of emotion regulation development.

    Free Register to Access Article