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Agaricus campestris

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Antonio M. Martin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Growth Response of the Mushroom Agaricus campestris to Nitrogen Sources When Cultivated in Submerged Fermentation
    Developments in food science, 2013
    Co-Authors: Antonio M. Martin
    Abstract:

    SUMMARY Several sources of nitrogen were employed to study the mycelial growth of the edible mushroom Agaricus campestris . The organic nitrogen sources tested were peptone, urea and yeast extract. The inorganic sources were ammonium citrate, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphosphate dibasic and potassium nitrate. The concentrations of the different sources of nitrogen were calculated to provide 0.5 g/L to a peat extract medium used as substrate. Different concentrations of yeast extract, which was the best nitrogen source added, were studied for their effects on growth and on the nitrogen content of the mycelial biomass.

  • Submerged Production of Agaricus campestris Mycellum in Peat Extracts
    Journal of Food Science, 2006
    Co-Authors: Antonio M. Martin
    Abstract:

    The edible mushroom Agaricus campestris has been grown using peat extracts as the only substrate source. Shaker flask fermentations were conducted with Sphagnum peat extracts obtained by autoclaving peat mixed with 1.5% (v/v) H2SO4 for 2 hr at 121°C. Inoculum ratio, temperature, initial pH, fermentation time and agitation were tested in order to evaluate the effect of those factors on the mycelial growth, expressed as final dry mycelium concentration and biomass yield (g of dry mycelium produced per g of carbohydrates consumed). The best combination of operating variables, in the range of values investigated, are: 4% (v/v) inoculum ratio, 24°C, pH 6.0, 6 days and 150 rpm.

Franc Pohleven – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Heavy metal bioaccumulation by wild edible saprophytic and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms.
    Environmental science and pollution research international, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ivan Širić, Boro Mioč, Ante Kasap, Miha Humar, Ivica Kos, Franc Pohleven
    Abstract:

    Heavy metals cause serious problems in the environment, and they can be accumulated in organisms, especially in the higher fungi. The concentration of Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd, and Hg in 10 species of edible mushrooms in Medvednica Nature Park, Croatia was therefore determined. In addition, the similarity between the studied species was determined by cluster analysis based on concentrations of the aforementioned metals in the fruiting bodies. The contents of nickel, chromium, lead, cadmium, and mercury in the fruiting bodies of mushrooms were obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The highest concentrations of Ni (3.62 mg kg(-1)), Cr (3.01 mg kg(-1)), and Cd (2.67 mg kg(-1)) were determined in Agaricus campestris. The highest concentration of Pb (1.67 mg kg(-1)) was determined in Macrolepiota procera, and the highest concentration of Hg (2.39 mg kg(-1)) was determined in Boletus edulis. The concentration of all heavy metals significantly differed (p 

Ivan Širić – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lead, cadmium and mercury contents and bioaccumulation potential of wild edible saprophytic and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms, Croatia.
    Journal of environmental science and health. Part. B Pesticides food contaminants and agricultural wastes, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ivan Širić, Ante Kasap, Dalibor Bedeković, Jerzy Falandysz
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTLead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) contents in ten species of edible mushrooms in Trakoscan, Croatia were determined. In addition, the similarity between the studied species was determined by cluster analysis. The caps and stipes of the fruiting bodies were analysed separately. The analyses were carried out by inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The greatest mean lead concentrations of 1.91 and 1.60 mg kg −1 were determined in caps and stipes of Macrolepiota procera. The greatest mean concentrations of cadmium (3.23 and 2.24 mg kg−1) were determined in caps and stipes of Agaricus campestris and of mercury (2.56 and 2.35 mg kg−1) in Boletus edulis. In terms of the anatomical parts of the fruiting body (cap-stipe), a considerably greater concentration of the analysed elements was found in the cap for all mushroom species. According to calculated bio-concentration factors, all the examined species were found to be bio-accumulators of Cd and Hg. On the basis of…

  • Accumulation of heavy metals in edible saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms
    Arhiv Za Higijenu Rada I Toksikologiju, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ivan Širić, Boro Mioč, Ante Kasap, Valentino Držaić
    Abstract:

    Heavy metals cause serious problems in the environment, and they can be accumulated in organisms, especially in the higher fungi. The increasing concentrations of heavy metals in mushrooms also increase the importance of fungi as potential biological indicators of environmental pollution. However, extremely high concentrations of toxic heavy metals in mushrooms can have negative effects on human health. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of heavy metals Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd and Hg in certain edible species of saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal fungi and the substrate collected in Gorski kotar. In this study we used 87 samples from 10 species of wild edible mushrooms from seven different genera, five of them saprotrophic species (Agaricus campestris (L) Fries, Armilariella mellea (Vahl. ex Fr.) Karst., Clitocybe inversa (Scop. ex Fr.) Pat., Clitocybe nebularis Batsch. ex Fr., Macrolepiota procera (Scop. ex Fr.) Sing., ) and five species of ectomycorrhizal fungi (Lactarius deterimus Groger, Boletus edulis Bull. ex Fries, Boletus aestivalis Paulet ex Fries, Tricholoma portentosum (Fr.) Quelet, Tricholoma terreum (Schff. ex Fr.) Kummer). The analyses of heavy metals in mushrooms and soil substrate were carried out by inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The highest concentrations of Ni (1.84 mg kg-1), Cr (1.32 mg kg-1), and Pb (1.38 mg kg-1) were determined in Macrolepiota procera. The highest concentration of Cd (1.47 mg kg-1) was determined in Agaricus campestris, and the highest concentration of Hg (1.59 mg kg-1) was determined in Boletus edulis. The concentration of Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd significantly differed (p

  • Heavy metal bioaccumulation by wild edible saprophytic and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms.
    Environmental science and pollution research international, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ivan Širić, Boro Mioč, Ante Kasap, Miha Humar, Ivica Kos, Franc Pohleven
    Abstract:

    Heavy metals cause serious problems in the environment, and they can be accumulated in organisms, especially in the higher fungi. The concentration of Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd, and Hg in 10 species of edible mushrooms in Medvednica Nature Park, Croatia was therefore determined. In addition, the similarity between the studied species was determined by cluster analysis based on concentrations of the aforementioned metals in the fruiting bodies. The contents of nickel, chromium, lead, cadmium, and mercury in the fruiting bodies of mushrooms were obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The highest concentrations of Ni (3.62 mg kg(-1)), Cr (3.01 mg kg(-1)), and Cd (2.67 mg kg(-1)) were determined in Agaricus campestris. The highest concentration of Pb (1.67 mg kg(-1)) was determined in Macrolepiota procera, and the highest concentration of Hg (2.39 mg kg(-1)) was determined in Boletus edulis. The concentration of all heavy metals significantly differed (p 

M Julia Melgar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Bioconcentration of chromium in edible mushrooms: influence of environmental and genetic factors.
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2013
    Co-Authors: M Angeles García, Julián Alonso, M Julia Melgar
    Abstract:

    Chromium concentrations were determined in 167 samples of wild edible mushrooms, collected from three different sites (urban, traffic and pastureland areas) in Lugo (NW Spain). The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The analyses were performed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The highest mean chromium levels (mg/kg dry weight) of 3.5 and 8.0, 4.5 and 6.2, and 6.2 and 4.3 were found in Lycoperdon utriforme, Coprinus comatus and Agaricus campestris in H and RFB, respectively. The highest concentrations of chromium were observed in terrestrial saprophytic species in relation to mycorrhizal species. With respect to the underlying substrates, chromium concentration was lowest in the pastureland area (24.6 mg/kg dw). All mushroom species were bioexclusors of chromium (BCF

  • Lead in edible mushrooms: levels and bioaccumulation factors.
    Journal of hazardous materials, 2009
    Co-Authors: M Angeles García, Julián Alonso, M Julia Melgar
    Abstract:

    Lead content was determined in 238 samples of 28 species of edible mushrooms collected from different sites in the province of Lugo (NW Spain) during 2005 and 2006. The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The analyses were carried out by an anodic stripping voltammetric technique using drop mercury as the working electrode. The highest mean lead contents (mg/kg dry weight) of 3.6 and 4.1, 3.0 and 2.2, 2.5 and 2.3, 2.4 and 2.3 were determined in Coprinus comatus, Agaricus campestris, Lepista nuda and Calvatia utriformis in hymenophore and the rest of fruiting bodies, respectively, while the lowest in Agaricus bisporus (0.35 in H and 0.54 in RFB) and Fistulina hepatica (0.41 in H and 0.50 in RFB). All mushroom species were bioexclusors of lead (BCF

Ante Kasap – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lead, cadmium and mercury contents and bioaccumulation potential of wild edible saprophytic and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms, Croatia.
    Journal of environmental science and health. Part. B Pesticides food contaminants and agricultural wastes, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ivan Širić, Ante Kasap, Dalibor Bedeković, Jerzy Falandysz
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTLead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) contents in ten species of edible mushrooms in Trakoscan, Croatia were determined. In addition, the similarity between the studied species was determined by cluster analysis. The caps and stipes of the fruiting bodies were analysed separately. The analyses were carried out by inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The greatest mean lead concentrations of 1.91 and 1.60 mg kg −1 were determined in caps and stipes of Macrolepiota procera. The greatest mean concentrations of cadmium (3.23 and 2.24 mg kg−1) were determined in caps and stipes of Agaricus campestris and of mercury (2.56 and 2.35 mg kg−1) in Boletus edulis. In terms of the anatomical parts of the fruiting body (cap-stipe), a considerably greater concentration of the analysed elements was found in the cap for all mushroom species. According to calculated bio-concentration factors, all the examined species were found to be bio-accumulators of Cd and Hg. On the basis of…

  • Accumulation of heavy metals in edible saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms
    Arhiv Za Higijenu Rada I Toksikologiju, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ivan Širić, Boro Mioč, Ante Kasap, Valentino Držaić
    Abstract:

    Heavy metals cause serious problems in the environment, and they can be accumulated in organisms, especially in the higher fungi. The increasing concentrations of heavy metals in mushrooms also increase the importance of fungi as potential biological indicators of environmental pollution. However, extremely high concentrations of toxic heavy metals in mushrooms can have negative effects on human health. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of heavy metals Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd and Hg in certain edible species of saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal fungi and the substrate collected in Gorski kotar. In this study we used 87 samples from 10 species of wild edible mushrooms from seven different genera, five of them saprotrophic species (Agaricus campestris (L) Fries, Armilariella mellea (Vahl. ex Fr.) Karst., Clitocybe inversa (Scop. ex Fr.) Pat., Clitocybe nebularis Batsch. ex Fr., Macrolepiota procera (Scop. ex Fr.) Sing., ) and five species of ectomycorrhizal fungi (Lactarius deterimus Groger, Boletus edulis Bull. ex Fries, Boletus aestivalis Paulet ex Fries, Tricholoma portentosum (Fr.) Quelet, Tricholoma terreum (Schff. ex Fr.) Kummer). The analyses of heavy metals in mushrooms and soil substrate were carried out by inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The highest concentrations of Ni (1.84 mg kg-1), Cr (1.32 mg kg-1), and Pb (1.38 mg kg-1) were determined in Macrolepiota procera. The highest concentration of Cd (1.47 mg kg-1) was determined in Agaricus campestris, and the highest concentration of Hg (1.59 mg kg-1) was determined in Boletus edulis. The concentration of Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd significantly differed (p

  • Heavy metal bioaccumulation by wild edible saprophytic and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms.
    Environmental science and pollution research international, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ivan Širić, Boro Mioč, Ante Kasap, Miha Humar, Ivica Kos, Franc Pohleven
    Abstract:

    Heavy metals cause serious problems in the environment, and they can be accumulated in organisms, especially in the higher fungi. The concentration of Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd, and Hg in 10 species of edible mushrooms in Medvednica Nature Park, Croatia was therefore determined. In addition, the similarity between the studied species was determined by cluster analysis based on concentrations of the aforementioned metals in the fruiting bodies. The contents of nickel, chromium, lead, cadmium, and mercury in the fruiting bodies of mushrooms were obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The highest concentrations of Ni (3.62 mg kg(-1)), Cr (3.01 mg kg(-1)), and Cd (2.67 mg kg(-1)) were determined in Agaricus campestris. The highest concentration of Pb (1.67 mg kg(-1)) was determined in Macrolepiota procera, and the highest concentration of Hg (2.39 mg kg(-1)) was determined in Boletus edulis. The concentration of all heavy metals significantly differed (p