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Agricultural Experiment Stations

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García Fabián – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Fifty-Second Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1940-1941
    New Mexico State University Library, 2017
    Co-Authors: García Fabián
    Abstract:

    Annual and Biennial Reports of the Regents of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts concerning the Agricultural Experiment Station had been sent to the Governor of New Mexico since 1891. The reports contained updates on the progress on studies and research projects conducted by staff members of the station. In addition, a financial statement of receipts and expenditures was included. The Hatch Act that was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1887 provided federal grant funds to set up and support a national network of Agricultural Experiment Stations distributed across U.S. states and territories. Linked to land-grant colleges, already established under the Morrill Act of 1862, the Stations have become scientific research centers substantially contributing to the advancement of Agricultural industry, environmental preservation, and human health. This digital collection includes reports published between 1889 and 1978

  • Thirtieth Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1918-1919
    New Mexico State University Library, 2017
    Co-Authors: García Fabián
    Abstract:

    Annual and Biennial Reports of the Regents of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts concerning the Agricultural Experiment Station had been sent to the Governor of New Mexico since 1891. The reports contained updates on the progress on studies and research projects conducted by staff members of the station. In addition, a financial statement of receipts and expenditures was included. The Hatch Act that was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1887 provided federal grant funds to set up and support a national network of Agricultural Experiment Stations distributed across U.S. states and territories. Linked to land-grant colleges, already established under the Morrill Act of 1862, the Stations have become scientific research centers substantially contributing to the advancement of Agricultural industry, environmental preservation, and human health. This digital collection includes reports published between 1889 and 1978

  • Twenty-Eighth Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1916-1917
    New Mexico State University Library, 2017
    Co-Authors: García Fabián
    Abstract:

    Annual and Biennial Reports of the Regents of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts concerning the Agricultural Experiment Station had been sent to the Governor of New Mexico since 1891. The reports contained updates on the progress on studies and research projects conducted by staff members of the station. In addition, a financial statement of receipts and expenditures was included. The Hatch Act that was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1887 provided federal grant funds to set up and support a national network of Agricultural Experiment Stations distributed across U.S. states and territories. Linked to land-grant colleges, already established under the Morrill Act of 1862, the Stations have become scientific research centers substantially contributing to the advancement of Agricultural industry, environmental preservation, and human health. This digital collection includes reports published between 1889 and 1978

Terry Nipp – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Agrosecurity: The Role of the Agricultural Experiment Stations
    Journal of Food Science, 2006
    Co-Authors: Terry Nipp
    Abstract:

    In order to protect the pation’s agriculture and food processing systems from the new threat of bioterror ism, Agricultural and food technology research must be effectively harnessed and applied. The U.S. conducts the majority of its Agricultural research through state-based Agricultural Experiment Stations. To respond to the new challenges of biosecurity, and to facilitate communication between the federal research system and the state-based Agricultural research system, the Directors of the State Agricultural Experiment Stations (SAES) facilitated the creation of a National Institute for Agricultural Security (NIAS). The mission of NIAS is to help address national homeland security and. biosecurity issues that affect the nationa’s ifarus and ranches, food production and distribution system, and rural communities by barnessing coordinating, and targetting Agricultural research and food science technology projects. NIAS was created to provide a from door and one-stop shopping for federal agencies and the public, NIAS is currently developing projects to improve site security at SAES field Stations and laboratories. The Institute is facilitating is facilitating the development of pronotype-secured information technology networks. NIAS is serving as a Ilaison to federal agency offices to help identify high priority Agricultural and food science research needs. The Institute is also exploring the possibility of collaborating in the devleopment of regional pathogen outbreak simulations with the regional university coordinators of the Dept. of Agriculture’s National Plant Diagnosites Network (NPDN). NIAS is collaborating with the Institute for Countermessures Against Bioterrorism to host an international workshop on the managing of events when harmful pathogens are introduce into the food supply. And, NIAS is exploring the potential role of university Cooperative Extension Service as part of the first responder network, as first detectors, and as facilitators for helping rural commcommunity leaders plan to address homeland security concerns.

Cai Guohong – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Charles R Brown – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Yukon Nugget: a Mid-Season Yellow Skin, Yellow Flesh Specialty Potato with Extreme Resistance to Potato Virus X
    American Journal of Potato Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Vidyasagar R. Sathuvalli, Richard G. Novy, Jonathan L. Whitworth, Charles R Brown, S. Yilma, B. A. Charlton, Clinton C. Shock, Richard A. Quick, Erik B.g. Feibert, Jeffrey C. Stark
    Abstract:

    Yukon Nugget is a mid-season specialty potato with yellow flesh, yellow skin and distinct red eyes. Yukon Nugget was developed to provide the potato industry with an alternative to Yukon Gold. The overall tuber size profile of Yukon Nugget is smaller and more uniform than Yukon Gold and it typically produces an average of four more tubers per plant than Yukon Gold. Yukon Nugget tubers are ideal for boiling, baking, and microwaving, and have culinary and nutritional qualities generally similar to Yukon Gold. Yukon Nugget has extreme resistance to Potato Virus X due to presence of PVX resistance allele Rx1. It also has moderate resistance to powdery scab and tuber late blight. Yukon Nugget has less vascular and stem end discoloration and less hollow heart than Yukon Gold. Yukon Nugget is similar to Yukon Gold in terms of susceptibility to several major potato diseases, such as PVY, PLRV, and foliage late blight. It was released in 2013 by the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Oregon, Idaho and Washington and the USDA-ARS, and is a product of the Pacific Northwest (Tri-State) Potato Variety Development Program.

  • Western russet: A new potato variety with excellent fresh market and frozen-fried processing quality and field resistance to common scab and PVYo
    American Journal of Potato Research, 2006
    Co-Authors: Stephen L. Love, Richard G. Novy, Jonathan L. Whitworth, Dennis L. Corsini, Joseph J. Pavek, A. R. Mosley, Mark J. Pavek, N. R. Knowles, Charles R Brown, S. R. James
    Abstract:

    Western Russet, designated Experimentally as A7961-1, and resulting from the cross A68113-4 x Bel-Rus, was released in 2004 by the USDA/ARS and the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The foliage of Western Russet is spreading, with medium-sized olive-green leaves and abundant white flowers. The tubers are tan, with medium russet skin, oblong shape, a slightly prominent eyebrow, white flesh, and distinctly visible pith. Western Russet was compared with Russet Burbank in trials across the Pacific Northwest for yield, quality, and disease response. In general, Western Russet produced lower total yields than Russet Burbank, but on average and depending on location, similar U.S. No. 1 yields. When observed for defect problems, Western Russet exhibited resistance to second growth, growth cracks, shatter bruise, stem-end discoloration, and heat necrosis, moderate resistance to hollow heart, and moderate susceptibility to blackspot bruise. In product quality tests, Western Russet was rated similar to Russet Burbank for french fry and dehydrated potato flake quality and slightly inferior for baked potato quality. In replicated evaluations, Western Russet was found to have good field resistance to common scab and PVYo, and moderate resistance to verticillium wilt and tuber net necrosis caused by PLRV. It demonstrated susceptibility to late blight, foliar PLRV, dry rot, soft rot, and tuber early blight. Biochemical analysis of Western Russet tubers showed markedly higher vitamin C content than those of Russet Burbank. Tuber glycoalkaloid concentration in tubers produced in a 1988 trial was 1.0 mg 100 g−1.

  • Alturas: A multi-purpose, Russet potato cultivar with high yield and tuber specific gravity
    American Journal of Potato Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Richard G. Novy, Stephen L. Love, S. R. James, Joseph J. Pavek, A. R. Mosley, D. L. Corsini, D. C. Hane, C. C. Shock, K. A. Rykbost, Charles R Brown
    Abstract:

    ‘Alturas’, a late-maturing, high-yielding, russet potato cultivar with high tuber specific gravity, was released in 2002 by the USDA-ARS and the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Originally selected for dehydration processing, its cold-sweetening resistance also makes it suitable for processing out of storage into french fries and other frozen potato products. Culinary quality is high, with larger tubers suitable for fresh market if heavily russeted skin is not essential. Alturas consistently produced greater total and U.S. No. 1 yields than ‘Russet Burbank’ and ‘Ranger Russet’ in southern Idaho trials. Across other western trial sites, total yields of Alturas have on average been 29% and 14% greater than Russet Burbank and Ranger Russet, respectively. Alturas is resistant to Verticillium wilt ( Verticillium dahliae ) and early blight ( Alternaria solani ). Compared with Russet Burbank and Ranger Russet, Alturas is less susceptible to corky ringspot and foliar and tuber infection by late blight ( Phytophthora infestans ). It also is less susceptible to tuber net necrosis and Fusarium dry rot than Russet Burbank, and is more resistant to common scab ( Streptomyces scabies ) than Ranger Russet. However, Alturas is more susceptible to infection by PVY and PVX than Ranger Russet. Total nitrogen application recommendations for Alturas are approximately 40% less than those for Russet Burbank. Alturas requires 15% to 20% more water during the growing season than does Russet Bur-bank.

Foster Luther – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nineteenth Annual Report of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Agricultural Experiment Station, 1907-1908
    New Mexico State University Library, 2017
    Co-Authors: Foster Luther
    Abstract:

    Annual and Biennial Reports of the Regents of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts concerning the Agricultural Experiment Station had been sent to the Governor of New Mexico since 1891. The reports contained updates on the progress on studies and research projects conducted by staff members of the station. In addition, a financial statement of receipts and expenditures was included. The Hatch Act that was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1887 provided federal grant funds to set up and support a national network of Agricultural Experiment Stations distributed across U.S. states and territories. Linked to land-grant colleges, already established under the Morrill Act of 1862, the Stations have become scientific research centers substantially contributing to the advancement of Agricultural industry, environmental preservation, and human health. This digital collection includes reports published between 1889 and 1978

  • Twentieth Annual Report of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Agricultural Experiment Station, 1908-1909
    New Mexico State University Library, 2017
    Co-Authors: Foster Luther
    Abstract:

    Annual and Biennial Reports of the Regents of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts concerning the Agricultural Experiment Station had been sent to the Governor of New Mexico since 1891. The reports contained updates on the progress on studies and research projects conducted by staff members of the station. In addition, a financial statement of receipts and expenditures was included. The Hatch Act that was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1887 provided federal grant funds to set up and support a national network of Agricultural Experiment Stations distributed across U.S. states and territories. Linked to land-grant colleges, already established under the Morrill Act of 1862, the Stations have become scientific research centers substantially contributing to the advancement of Agricultural industry, environmental preservation, and human health. This digital collection includes reports published between 1889 and 1978

  • Twenty-Third Annual Report, Agricultural Experiment Station of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1911-1912
    New Mexico State University Library, 2017
    Co-Authors: Foster Luther
    Abstract:

    Annual and Biennial Reports of the Regents of the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts concerning the Agricultural Experiment Station had been sent to the Governor of New Mexico since 1891. The reports contained updates on the progress on studies and research projects conducted by staff members of the station. In addition, a financial statement of receipts and expenditures was included. The Hatch Act that was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1887 provided federal grant funds to set up and support a national network of Agricultural Experiment Stations distributed across U.S. states and territories. Linked to land-grant colleges, already established under the Morrill Act of 1862, the Stations have become scientific research centers substantially contributing to the advancement of Agricultural industry, environmental preservation, and human health. This digital collection includes reports published between 1889 and 1978