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Aino Virus

The Experts below are selected from a list of 126 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Tomoyuki Tsuda – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • molecular epidemiological analyses of the teratogenic Aino Virus based on the sequences of a small rna segment
    Veterinary Microbiology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Makoto Yamakawa, Tohru Yanase, Tomoko Kato, Tomoyuki Tsuda

    Abstract:

    The sequences of a small RNA segment of Aino Virus isolates were analyzed to define the molecular epidemiology and genetic relationships to other species in the genus OrthobunyaVirus in the family Bunyaviridae. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the segment were highly conserved among strains isolated from 1964 to 2002 in Japan. These Japanese isolates were segregated into two distinct lineages, one containing the prototype strain JaNAr28 isolated in 1964 and the other containing strains isolated after 1986, by phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleocapsid gene sequences. Japanese strains isolated after 1986 were rather more closely related to Kaikalur Virus isolated in India in 1971 than to strain JaNAr28. On the other hand, an Australian strain, B7974, was closely related to Peaton Virus. The B7974 strain might have been generated by inter-serotype genetic reassortment between Aino and Peaton Viruses in Australia during their evolution. However, recent Aino Virus strains isolated in Japan appear to be genetically stable.

  • arthrogryposis hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia syndrome in neonatal calves resulting from intrauterine infection with Aino Virus
    Veterinary Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Tomoyuki Tsuda, Kazuo Yoshida, Seiichi Ohashi, Tohru Yanase, Masuo Sueyoshi, Syunichi Kamimura, Kazuhiro Misumi, Katsumi Hamana, Hiroshi Sakamoto, Makoto Yamakawa

    Abstract:

    To determine the teratogenic potential of Aino Virus (AinoV) in cattle, pregnant cows and fetal cattle were infected with a fresh isolate of AinoV. Five pregnant cows were inoculated intravenously with the Virus at 122 to 162 days of gestation and allowed to give birth. All of the cows developed neutralizing antibodies to the Virus, indicating that the cows had been infected with the Virus; however, no clinical abnormalities were seen in their six newborn calves, and no specific antibodies to the Virus were detected in the precolostral serum of calves. Five fetuses with fetal ages ranging from 132 to 156 days were inoculated in utero with the Virus. One weak newborn and four stillborn calves were delivered at gestation days 256 to 263, i.e., less than the standard gestation term; they had congenital abnormalities including arthrogryposis, hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia. Antibodies specific to AinoV were detected in their precolostral serum. These results demonstrate that AinoV is a potential etiological agent of congenital malformation of cattle.

  • Simultaneous detection of bovine arboViruses using single-tube multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction
    Journal of Virological Methods, 2004
    Co-Authors: Seiichi Ohashi, Kazuo Yoshida, Tohru Yanase, Tomoko Kato, Tomoyuki Tsuda

    Abstract:

    Abstract Single-tube multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was developed to detect and identify arboViruses in infected cell-culture fluids and field specimens. The technique was equally sensitive for detecting five different Viruses in cell cultures, namely the Chuzan, Ibaraki, and Bluetongue Viruses belonging to OrbiVirus, and the Akabane Virus and Peaton Virus belonging to OrthobunyaVirus, and was less sensitive than former Viruses for detecting Aino Virus belonging to OrthobunyaVirus. The mRT-PCR reliably detected 0.6–103.1 median tissue culture infective doses. The mRT-PCR readily identified Viruses by discriminating the size of their amplified gene products. The technique was as sensitive as Virus isolation in detecting single infected plasma in five plasmas from sentinel cattle and in detecting two infectious homogenates in eight homogenates of Culicoides biting midges. The mRT-PCR may be a sensitive and rapid assay for surveillance of bovine arboViruses in field specimens.

Kazuo Yoshida – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Simultaneous detection of bovine arboViruses using single-tube multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction
    Journal of Virological Methods, 2004
    Co-Authors: Seiichi Ohashi, Kazuo Yoshida, Tohru Yanase, Tomoko Kato, Tomoyuki Tsuda

    Abstract:

    Abstract Single-tube multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was developed to detect and identify arboViruses in infected cell-culture fluids and field specimens. The technique was equally sensitive for detecting five different Viruses in cell cultures, namely the Chuzan, Ibaraki, and Bluetongue Viruses belonging to OrbiVirus, and the Akabane Virus and Peaton Virus belonging to OrthobunyaVirus, and was less sensitive than former Viruses for detecting Aino Virus belonging to OrthobunyaVirus. The mRT-PCR reliably detected 0.6–103.1 median tissue culture infective doses. The mRT-PCR readily identified Viruses by discriminating the size of their amplified gene products. The technique was as sensitive as Virus isolation in detecting single infected plasma in five plasmas from sentinel cattle and in detecting two infectious homogenates in eight homogenates of Culicoides biting midges. The mRT-PCR may be a sensitive and rapid assay for surveillance of bovine arboViruses in field specimens.

  • arthrogryposis hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia syndrome in neonatal calves resulting from intrauterine infection with Aino Virus
    Veterinary Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Tomoyuki Tsuda, Kazuo Yoshida, Seiichi Ohashi, Tohru Yanase, Masuo Sueyoshi, Syunichi Kamimura, Kazuhiro Misumi, Katsumi Hamana, Hiroshi Sakamoto, Makoto Yamakawa

    Abstract:

    To determine the teratogenic potential of Aino Virus (AinoV) in cattle, pregnant cows and fetal cattle were infected with a fresh isolate of AinoV. Five pregnant cows were inoculated intravenously with the Virus at 122 to 162 days of gestation and allowed to give birth. All of the cows developed neutralizing antibodies to the Virus, indicating that the cows had been infected with the Virus; however, no clinical abnormalities were seen in their six newborn calves, and no specific antibodies to the Virus were detected in the precolostral serum of calves. Five fetuses with fetal ages ranging from 132 to 156 days were inoculated in utero with the Virus. One weak newborn and four stillborn calves were delivered at gestation days 256 to 263, i.e., less than the standard gestation term; they had congenital abnormalities including arthrogryposis, hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia. Antibodies specific to AinoV were detected in their precolostral serum. These results demonstrate that AinoV is a potential etiological agent of congenital malformation of cattle.

  • Sequence analysis of the medium RNA segment of three Simbu serogroup Viruses, Akabane, Aino, and Peaton Viruses ☆
    Virus Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Tohru Yanase, Kazuo Yoshida, Seiichi Ohashi, Tomoko Kato, Tomoyuki Tsuda

    Abstract:

    The sequence analysis was carried out for the medium (M) RNA segment of the Akabane Virus (AKAV), Aino Virus (AINV), and Peaton Virus (PEAV) of the Simbu serogroup of the genus OrthobunyaVirus of the family Bunyaviridae. The complementary sequences of the M RNA segments of AKAV, AINV, and PEAV contain a single large open reading frame (ORF), like other orthobunyaViruses. The ORFs potentially encode 1401 amino acids (aa), 1404 aa, and 1400 aa polypeptides, respectively. The identity of the M segment among these Viruses is remarkably low, although previous researchers reported that the small RNA segments are highly conserved. Because the M segment codes for the viral surface glycoproteins G1 and G2, the variability of the M segment may affect the antigenicity of these Viruses. Phylogenetic studies based on the M and S segment sequences suggested that genetic reassortment has been occurring among ancestral Viruses of the three Simbu serogroup Viruses throughout their evolution.

Tohru Yanase – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • molecular epidemiological analyses of the teratogenic Aino Virus based on the sequences of a small rna segment
    Veterinary Microbiology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Makoto Yamakawa, Tohru Yanase, Tomoko Kato, Tomoyuki Tsuda

    Abstract:

    The sequences of a small RNA segment of Aino Virus isolates were analyzed to define the molecular epidemiology and genetic relationships to other species in the genus OrthobunyaVirus in the family Bunyaviridae. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the segment were highly conserved among strains isolated from 1964 to 2002 in Japan. These Japanese isolates were segregated into two distinct lineages, one containing the prototype strain JaNAr28 isolated in 1964 and the other containing strains isolated after 1986, by phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleocapsid gene sequences. Japanese strains isolated after 1986 were rather more closely related to Kaikalur Virus isolated in India in 1971 than to strain JaNAr28. On the other hand, an Australian strain, B7974, was closely related to Peaton Virus. The B7974 strain might have been generated by inter-serotype genetic reassortment between Aino and Peaton Viruses in Australia during their evolution. However, recent Aino Virus strains isolated in Japan appear to be genetically stable.

  • arthrogryposis hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia syndrome in neonatal calves resulting from intrauterine infection with Aino Virus
    Veterinary Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Tomoyuki Tsuda, Kazuo Yoshida, Seiichi Ohashi, Tohru Yanase, Masuo Sueyoshi, Syunichi Kamimura, Kazuhiro Misumi, Katsumi Hamana, Hiroshi Sakamoto, Makoto Yamakawa

    Abstract:

    To determine the teratogenic potential of Aino Virus (AinoV) in cattle, pregnant cows and fetal cattle were infected with a fresh isolate of AinoV. Five pregnant cows were inoculated intravenously with the Virus at 122 to 162 days of gestation and allowed to give birth. All of the cows developed neutralizing antibodies to the Virus, indicating that the cows had been infected with the Virus; however, no clinical abnormalities were seen in their six newborn calves, and no specific antibodies to the Virus were detected in the precolostral serum of calves. Five fetuses with fetal ages ranging from 132 to 156 days were inoculated in utero with the Virus. One weak newborn and four stillborn calves were delivered at gestation days 256 to 263, i.e., less than the standard gestation term; they had congenital abnormalities including arthrogryposis, hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia. Antibodies specific to AinoV were detected in their precolostral serum. These results demonstrate that AinoV is a potential etiological agent of congenital malformation of cattle.

  • Simultaneous detection of bovine arboViruses using single-tube multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction
    Journal of Virological Methods, 2004
    Co-Authors: Seiichi Ohashi, Kazuo Yoshida, Tohru Yanase, Tomoko Kato, Tomoyuki Tsuda

    Abstract:

    Abstract Single-tube multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) assay was developed to detect and identify arboViruses in infected cell-culture fluids and field specimens. The technique was equally sensitive for detecting five different Viruses in cell cultures, namely the Chuzan, Ibaraki, and Bluetongue Viruses belonging to OrbiVirus, and the Akabane Virus and Peaton Virus belonging to OrthobunyaVirus, and was less sensitive than former Viruses for detecting Aino Virus belonging to OrthobunyaVirus. The mRT-PCR reliably detected 0.6–103.1 median tissue culture infective doses. The mRT-PCR readily identified Viruses by discriminating the size of their amplified gene products. The technique was as sensitive as Virus isolation in detecting single infected plasma in five plasmas from sentinel cattle and in detecting two infectious homogenates in eight homogenates of Culicoides biting midges. The mRT-PCR may be a sensitive and rapid assay for surveillance of bovine arboViruses in field specimens.