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Airborne Dust

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Bert Brunekreef – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Do central vacuum cleaners produce less indoor Airborne Dust or Airborne cat allergen, during and after vacuuming, compared with regular vacuum cleaners?
    Indoor air, 2004
    Co-Authors: R.t. Van Strien, Gert Doekes, M. N. B. M. Driessen, Marieke Oldenwening, Bert Brunekreef
    Abstract:

    Vacuum cleaners with a central exhaust may lead to lower Airborne Dust and allergen concentrations compared with regular vacuum cleaners. In 12 houses, equipped with a central vacuum cleaning system, a standardized vacuum cleaning protocol was performed comparing Airborne Dust and allergen concentrations between the central system and a regular cleaner. Airborne Dust concentrations during (104 vs. 95 lg/m 3 ) and after vacuum cleaning (38 vs. 36 lg/m 3 ) were not significantly different. In houses with a cat, Fel d 1con- centrations were also not significantly different either during (6.12 vs. 5.91ng/m 3 ) and after (0.64 vs. 0.91ng/m 3 ) use of the vacuum cleaners. Airborne Dust and Fel d 1concentrations increased considerably during use of both vacuum cleaners. Compared with central vacuum cleaning systems, conventional modern vacuum cleaners do not cause higher Airborne Dust or cat allergen concentrations during and after use.

Gert Doekes – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • beta-(1,3)-Glucan exposure assessment by passive Airborne Dust sampling and new sensitive immunoassays.
    Applied and environmental microbiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Ilka Noss, Inge M. Wouters, Gillina F. G. Bezemer, Nervana Metwali, Ingrid Sander, Monika Raulf-heimsoth, Dick Heederik, Peter S. Thorne, Gert Doekes
    Abstract:

    Associations between house Dust-associated beta-(1,3)-glucan exposure and airway inflammatory reactions have been reported, while such exposures in early childhood have been suggested to protect against asthma and wheezing. Most epidemiological studies have used reservoir Dust samples and an inhibition enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for beta-(1,3)-glucan exposure assessment. The objective of this study was to develop inexpensive but highly sensitive enzyme immunoassays to measure Airborne beta-(1,3)-glucans in low-exposure environments, like homes. Specificities of available anti-beta-(1,3)-glucan antibodies were defined by direct and inhibition experiments. Three suitable antibody combinations were selected for sandwich EIAs. beta-(1,3)-Glucans in passive Airborne Dust collected with an electrostatic Dust fall collector (EDC) and floor Dust from seven homes were measured with the three EIAs. Floor Dust samples were additionally analyzed in the inhibition EIA. The sandwich EIAs were sensitive enough for Airborne glucan measurement and showed different specificities for commercial glucans, while the beta-(1,3)-glucan levels in house Dust samples correlated strongly. The feasibility of measuring glucans in Airborne Dust with the recently introduced EDC method was further investigated by selecting the most suitable of the three EIAs to measure and compare beta-(1,3)-glucan levels in the EDC and in floor and actively collected Airborne Dust samples of the previously performed EDC validation study. The EDC beta-(1,3)-glucan levels correlated moderately with beta-(1,3)-glucans in actively collected Airborne Dust and floor Dust samples, while the glucan levels in the Airborne Dust and floor Dust samples did not correlate. The combination of the newly developed beta-(1,3)-glucan sandwich EIA with EDC sampling now allows assessment in large-scale population studies of exposure to Airborne beta-(1,3)-glucans in homes or other low-exposure environments.

  • The Dustfall collector–a simple passive tool for long-term collection of Airborne Dust: a project under the Danish Mould in Buildings program (DAMIB).
    Indoor Air, 2005
    Co-Authors: H. Würtz, Gert Doekes, Torben Sigsgaard, O. Valbjørn, Harald William Meyer
    Abstract:

    UNLABELLED A newly developed Dustfall device that collects Airborne Dust by sedimentation has been evaluated in Danish schools. Dust collected over 140 days was compared with Airborne Dust sampled during single school days and settled floor Dust sampled at the end of a school day. Measurements of culturable fungi in air samples corresponded well to those from the Dustfall collector in mechanically but not naturally ventilated rooms. Levels of beta(1 –> 3)glucan and culturable fungi in Dust from the Dustfall collector and settled floor Dust did not agree well. Up to 10 times more beta(1 –> 3)glucan per milligram Dust was found in the Dustfall collectors than in settled floor Dust. Only in Dust from the Dustfall collector was the mass concentration of culturable fungi (cfu/mg) significantly correlated with the degree of dampness. The culturability of fungi in the 140-day Dustfall samples tended to be lower than in other types of samples. Nonetheless, the results indicated that the Dustfall collector can be used to estimate the median concentration of Airborne culturable fungi, provided identical sampling periods are used for all samples. The collector is cost effective and simple to use. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS Traditional ways of assessing exposure to microorganisms by sampling Airborne Dust or Dust from floors have several disadvantages. In the present paper, a new sampler, the Dustfall collector, which collects Airborne Dust by sedimentation over a period of months, is introduced. Tests of this collector indicate that it can be used to estimate the mean concentration of Airborne culturable fungi but not beta(1 –> 3)glucan over a long period and that the method can differentiate between buildings with different levels of water damage.

  • Do central vacuum cleaners produce less indoor Airborne Dust or Airborne cat allergen, during and after vacuuming, compared with regular vacuum cleaners?
    Indoor air, 2004
    Co-Authors: R.t. Van Strien, Gert Doekes, M. N. B. M. Driessen, Marieke Oldenwening, Bert Brunekreef
    Abstract:

    Vacuum cleaners with a central exhaust may lead to lower Airborne Dust and allergen concentrations compared with regular vacuum cleaners. In 12 houses, equipped with a central vacuum cleaning system, a standardized vacuum cleaning protocol was performed comparing Airborne Dust and allergen concentrations between the central system and a regular cleaner. Airborne Dust concentrations during (104 vs. 95 lg/m 3 ) and after vacuum cleaning (38 vs. 36 lg/m 3 ) were not significantly different. In houses with a cat, Fel d 1con- centrations were also not significantly different either during (6.12 vs. 5.91ng/m 3 ) and after (0.64 vs. 0.91ng/m 3 ) use of the vacuum cleaners. Airborne Dust and Fel d 1concentrations increased considerably during use of both vacuum cleaners. Compared with central vacuum cleaning systems, conventional modern vacuum cleaners do not cause higher Airborne Dust or cat allergen concentrations during and after use.

Paul E. Todhunter – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Historical reduction of Airborne Dust in the Red River Valley of the North
    Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, 1999
    Co-Authors: Paul E. Todhunter, L.j. Cihacek
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT: Seasonal extremes in temperature, moisture, and snow cover cause the formation of very fine aggregates, resulting in periods of severe wind erosion in fine-textured soils of the Red River Valley of the North. Changes in trends of Dust observations have not been quantified in previous studies. The study compiled the number of Airborne Dust observations for the Fargo National Weather Service Office for the period 1948 to 1994 to document the historical frequency of Airborne Dust in the Red River Valley of the North. Concurrent trends in agricultural land use patterns, selected climatic data, and farm management practices also were evaluated. Results indicate a decreasing frequency of occurrence of Airborne Dust observations over time. Historical land use patterns and climatic trends were unable to explain the observed reduction in the wind erosion hazard. The best explanation for the reduced incidence of Airborne Dust appears to be the adoption of improved farm management practices. This includes the development of an extensive system of shelterbelts, improved farm technology, and basic changes in cultural practices, such as conservation tilltillage, crop resiresidue management, and land retirement programs. It is difficult, however, to determine the relative contribution of these specific changes upon the observation of Airborne Dust events because many economic, social, political, and technological factors have combined to create fundamental changes in agriculture and farming practices in the Red River Valley.

  • A climatology of Airborne Dust for the Red River Valley of North Dakota
    Atmospheric Environment, 1998
    Co-Authors: Nancy A Godon, Paul E. Todhunter
    Abstract:

    Abstract The Red River Valley of North Dakota has been identified as one of the highest potential Dust production regions in the United States. This paper provides a climatological summary of the Airborne Dust environment in the region using historical meteorological data for Fargo, North Dakota. Data for the period 1948–1994 were extracted for all 3-hourly weather observations which recorded an obstruction to vision due to Dust, blowing Dust or Dust storms. Data were compiled on the year, month, day and hour of each observation, as well as the horizontal visibility, wind speed, wind direction, and other present weather occurring at the time of each event. Airborne Dust events in the Red River Valley of the North normally involve local entrainment of Dust, and show a strong peak in the frequency of occurrence during the afternoon and spring seasons, although a secondary winter peak is also present. Dust events have decreased in frequency over the study period, apparently in response to improved farm management practices. Most events fall into two basic categories: winter events generated by passing cold fronts or strong regional pressure gradients, and often accompanied by blowing snow and light snow showers, and spring events triggered by the passage of cyclones and fronts, and normally not accompanied by other prevailing weather at the time of the observation. Results are discussed in relation to the unique soil, meteorological and surface cover conditions of the Red River Valley of North Dakota.

Naoki Nishino – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • An investigation of seasonal variations in the microbiota of milk, feces, bedding, and Airborne Dust
    Asian-Australasian journal of animal sciences, 2019
    Co-Authors: Thuong Thi Nguyen, Naoki Nishino
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE The microbiota of dairy cow milk varies with the season, and this accounts in part for the seasonal variation in mastitis-causing bacteria and milk spoilage. The microbiota of the cowshed may be the most important factor because the teats of a dairy cow contact bedding material when the cow is resting. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether the microbiota of the milk and the cowshed vary between seasons, and to elucidate the relationship between the microbiota. METHODS We used 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to investigate the microbiota of milk, feces, bedding, and Airborne Dust collected at a dairy farm during summer and winter. RESULTS The seasonal differences in the milk yield and milk composition were marginal. The fecal microbiota was stable across the two seasons. Many bacterial taxa of the bedding and Airborne Dust microbiota exhibited distinctive seasonal variation. In the milk microbiota, the abundances of Staphylococcaceae, Bacillaceae, Streptococcaceae, Microbacteriaceae, and Micrococcaceae were affected by the seasons; however, only Micrococcaceae had the same seasonal variation pattern as the bedding and Airborne Dust microbiota. Nevertheless, canonical analysis of principle coordinates revealed a distinctive group comprising the milk, bedding, and Airborne Dust microbiota. CONCLUSION Although the milk microbiota is related to the bedding and Airborne Dust microbiota, the relationship may not account for the seasonal variation in the milk microbiota. Some major bacterial families stably found in the bedding and Airborne Dust microbiota, e.g., Staphylococcaceae, Moraxellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Bacteroidaceae, may have greater influences than those that varied between seasons.

  • The Relationship between Uterine, Fecal, Bedding, and Airborne Dust Microbiota from Dairy Cows and Their Environment: A Pilot Study.
    Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 2019
    Co-Authors: Thuong Thi Nguyen, Ayumi Miyake, Tu T. M. Tran, Takeshi Tsuruta, Naoki Nishino
    Abstract:

    The aim of this study was to characterize uterine, fecal, bedding, and Airborne Dust microbiota from postpartum dairy cows and their environment. The cows were managed by the free-stall housing system, and samples for microbiota and serum metabolite assessment were collected during summer and winter when the cows were at one and two months postpartum. Uterine microbiota varied between seasons; the five most prevalent taxa were Enterobacteriaceae, Moraxellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae during summer, and Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Bacteroidaceae, Moraxellaceae, and Clostridiaceae during winter. Although Actinomycetaceae and Mycoplasmataceae were detected at high abundance in several uterine samples, the relationship between the uterine microbiota and serum metabolite concentrations was unclear. The fecal microbiota was stable regardless of the season, whereas bedding and Airborne Dust microbiota varied between summer and winter. With regards to uterine, bedding, and Airborne Dust microbiota, Enterobacteriaceae, Moraxellaceae, Staphylococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae were more abundant during summer, and Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Bacteroidaceae, and Clostridiaceae were more abundant during winter. Canonical analysis of principal coordinates confirmed the relationship between uterine and cowshed microbiota. These results indicated that the uterine microbiota may vary when the microbiota in cowshed environments changes.

  • rumen fluid feces milk water feed Airborne Dust and bedding microbiota in dairy farms managed by automatic milking systems
    Animal Science Journal, 2019
    Co-Authors: Qui D Nguyen, Takeshi Tsuruta, Tu T. M. Tran, Minh Thuy Tang, Naoki Nishino
    Abstract:

    Microbiota of the gut, milk, and cowshed environment were examined at two dairy farms managed by automatic milking systems (AMS). Feed, rumen fluid, feces, milk, bedding, water, and Airborne Dust were collected and the microbiota on each was assessed by Illumina MiSeq sequencing. The most abundant taxa in feed, rumen fluid, feces, bedding, and water were Lactobacillaceae, Prevotellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Lactobacillaceae, respectively, at both farms. Aerococcaceae was the most abundant taxon in milk and Airborne Dust microbiota at farm 1, and Staphylococcaceae and Lactobacillaceae were the most abundant taxa in milk and Airborne Dust microbiota at farm 2. The three most prevalent taxa (Aerococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, and Ruminococcaceae at farm 1 and Staphylococcaceae, Lactobacillaceae, and Ruminococcaceae at farm 2) were shared between milk and Airborne Dust microbiota. Indeed, SourceTracker indicated that milk microbiota was related with Airborne Dust microbiota. Meanwhile, hierarchical clustering and canonical analysis of principal coordinates demonstrated that the milk microbiota was associated with the bedding microbiota but clearly separated from feed, rumen fluid, feces, and water microbiota. Although our findings were derived from only two case studies, the importance of cowshed management for milk quality control and mastitis prevention was emphasized at farms managed by AMS.

R.t. Van Strien – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Do central vacuum cleaners produce less indoor Airborne Dust or Airborne cat allergen, during and after vacuuming, compared with regular vacuum cleaners?
    Indoor air, 2004
    Co-Authors: R.t. Van Strien, Gert Doekes, M. N. B. M. Driessen, Marieke Oldenwening, Bert Brunekreef
    Abstract:

    Vacuum cleaners with a central exhaust may lead to lower Airborne Dust and allergen concentrations compared with regular vacuum cleaners. In 12 houses, equipped with a central vacuum cleaning system, a standardized vacuum cleaning protocol was performed comparing Airborne Dust and allergen concentrations between the central system and a regular cleaner. Airborne Dust concentrations during (104 vs. 95 lg/m 3 ) and after vacuum cleaning (38 vs. 36 lg/m 3 ) were not significantly different. In houses with a cat, Fel d 1con- centrations were also not significantly different either during (6.12 vs. 5.91ng/m 3 ) and after (0.64 vs. 0.91ng/m 3 ) use of the vacuum cleaners. Airborne Dust and Fel d 1concentrations increased considerably during use of both vacuum cleaners. Compared with central vacuum cleaning systems, conventional modern vacuum cleaners do not cause higher Airborne Dust or cat allergen concentrations during and after use.