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Aircraft Fuels

The Experts below are selected from a list of 51 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Christopher Willam Wilson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • aviation gas turbine alternative Fuels a review
    Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, 2011
    Co-Authors: Simon Blakey, Christopher Willam Wilson

    Abstract:

    Abstract The development of kerosene-like drop-in alternative Aircraft Fuels is currently receiving increased attention. Using a range payload approach the need for drop in Fuels is justified. The alternative Fuels available can be categorised into two groups; depending on whether the product increases supply security of supply or provides a reduced environmental footprint. This paper uncovers this relationship through a review of commercially available process technologies (Transesterfication, Fischer–Tropsch (FT) and hydroprocessing (HRJ)) to produce alternative Fuels. The lifecycle assessments available are reviewed to identify what are actually clean Fuels or have the potential to be one. A summary of the recent alternative fuel flight test campaigns is given and there results evaluated along with ground based results. A review of combustion characteristics available for the alternative Fuels including ignition characteristics are presented to demonstrate the effect the distillation curve has on combustion and how too narrow a distribution of components in the fuel could generate problems with high altitude relight. The effect alternative Fuels have on gaseous emissions regulated by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP) is discussed and shown to be engine hardware dependant. Experimental data, from an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) engine, are provided showing how, although the Gas to Liquid (GtL) and Coal to Liquid (CtL) FT Fuels may not reduce GHG emissions, even with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS), the local air quality around airports will benefit through reduced particulate emissions. Finally the prospects for future fuel development are discussed.

Simon Blakey – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • aviation gas turbine alternative Fuels a review
    Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, 2011
    Co-Authors: Simon Blakey, Christopher Willam Wilson

    Abstract:

    Abstract The development of kerosene-like drop-in alternative Aircraft Fuels is currently receiving increased attention. Using a range payload approach the need for drop in Fuels is justified. The alternative Fuels available can be categorised into two groups; depending on whether the product increases supply security of supply or provides a reduced environmental footprint. This paper uncovers this relationship through a review of commercially available process technologies (Transesterfication, Fischer–Tropsch (FT) and hydroprocessing (HRJ)) to produce alternative Fuels. The lifecycle assessments available are reviewed to identify what are actually clean Fuels or have the potential to be one. A summary of the recent alternative fuel flight test campaigns is given and there results evaluated along with ground based results. A review of combustion characteristics available for the alternative Fuels including ignition characteristics are presented to demonstrate the effect the distillation curve has on combustion and how too narrow a distribution of components in the fuel could generate problems with high altitude relight. The effect alternative Fuels have on gaseous emissions regulated by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP) is discussed and shown to be engine hardware dependant. Experimental data, from an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) engine, are provided showing how, although the Gas to Liquid (GtL) and Coal to Liquid (CtL) FT Fuels may not reduce GHG emissions, even with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS), the local air quality around airports will benefit through reduced particulate emissions. Finally the prospects for future fuel development are discussed.

Tedd B Biddle – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Properties of Aircraft Fuels and Related Materials.
    , 1991
    Co-Authors: Tedd B Biddle

    Abstract:

    Abstract : Topics of this technical study include: general analysis and characterization of conventional and experimental fuel properties which are unique and/or critical to engine performance and durability; special investigations; development and evaluation of new test methods; refinement of existing test methods; additive evaluation and quantification; investigation of fuel and material related field problems; advanced fuel requirements; and fuel system parameters for current and advanced engines. Specific topics include: lubricity, thermal stability, vapor pressure, thermal conductivity, high density Fuels, corrosion inhibitors, and combustion.