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Airworthiness Directive

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Knepel, Aaron R. – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Navy flying clubs management control systems and performance measures
    Monterey California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2002
    Co-Authors: Knepel, Aaron R.
    Abstract:

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimitedThe Monterey Navy Flying Club has undergone tremendous change in the last decade by sustaining a painful downsizing due to the closure of Fort Ord and the substantial reduction in number of members, flight hours, aircraft, and staff. During the peak period when Fort Ord was open the volume of members and flight hours allowed informal short-term planning to fulfill all the clubs financial needs. Additionally, the club had an ample supply of surplus military aircraft along with significant free parts support. Currently, the club has depleted its supply of free parts support and is now faced with the dilemma of whether or not to keep one T-34 in compliance with an expensive Airworthiness Directive. The clubs current financial control measures are do not provide insight into the financial health of the organization. MWR provides financial statements but there is currently no analysis of the statements. The focus has been on short-term thinking that has led to other Navy Flying Clubs disbanding and aircraft that are otherwise airworthy being grounded due to insufficient funds to overhaul components. Monterey Navy Flying Club has been living in the short-term management mode and is still struggling to settle into its new environment of fewer members and aircraft. Navy Flying Clubs need to start assessing their maintenance and aircraft replacement needs and budgeting accordingly. Today the clubs have no plans to pay for replacement aircraft when the current aircraft become unserviceable. Monterey Navy Flying Club’s focus has remained short term throughout this turbulent period. They have data to analyze, but no method to do so. What is needed is to determine what financial measures can be used to provide an assessment of how the club is performing in the short, medium, and long run.Captain, United States Marine Corp

Aaron R. Knepel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Navy flying clubs management control systems and performance measures
    , 2002
    Co-Authors: Aaron R. Knepel
    Abstract:

    Abstract : The Monterey Navy Flying Club has undergone tremendous change in the last decade. The club has sustained a painful downsizing due to the closure of Fort Ord and the substantial reduction in number of members, flight hours, aircraft, and staff. During the peak period when Fort Ord was open the volume of members and flight hours allowed informal short-term planning to fulfill all the clubs financial needs. Additionally, the club had an ample supply of surplus military aircraft (T-34E’s & T-4l’s) along with significant free parts support that allowed extremely low prices which covered all overhead. Currently, the club has essentially depleted its supply of free parts support (especially engines and propellers) and is now faced with the dilemma of whether or not to keep one T-34E in compliance with an expensive Airworthiness Directive. Now more than ever, this club and other Navy Flying Clubs need objective strategic financial advice on what course of action to pursue. The clubs current financial control measures are do not provide insight into the financial health of the organization. MWR provides financial statements but there is currently no analysis of what the reports are saying. The focus has been on short-term thinking. When the clubs see they have enough money for the next month or two, they cease evaluating their financial position. This has led to clubs disbanding in the worst case and aircraft that are otherwise airworthy being grounded due to insufficient funds to overhaul and engine or other maintenance troubles. The club has been living in the short-term management mode for years and is still struggling to settle into its new business environment of fewer members and planes. All Navy Flying Clubs need to start assessing their maintenance and aircraft replacement needs and budgeting accordingly. In the past when free planes and parts were the norm the lack of planning had no effect.

Vincent Y. Tseng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal monitoring system for aircraft cargo bay fire safety
    Optical Engineering, 1991
    Co-Authors: Michael L. Parsons, Vincent Y. Tseng
    Abstract:

    Fire detection systems as they are now configured in aircraft cargo bays do not always meet the current FAA requirements, including a specification that a fire be detected within 1 mm after initiation. A new FAA Airworthiness Directive requires upgraded fire detection systems on all combination passenger/cargo aircraft built by Boeing and McDonnell Douglas. A thermal monitoring/fire detection system that meets the new FAA regulations has been developed. It is based on infrared detection technology coupled with a Fresnel scanning optical system. The system uses a dual computer controller unit, which permits totally redundant thermal monitoring within the cargo bay. The system is responsive to either overheat or fire conditions, has three levels of fire alaralarm signal, incorporates complete optical coverage and electronic circcircuitry redundancy, and provides fire location information. It is highly reliable and immune to false alarm stimuli. Each sensor is designed to cover a portion of the cargo bay approximately 20 ft in diameter from 12 ft above. A system description is presented, and performance characteristics for fire/overheat and false alarm immunity are discussed.

Michael L. Parsons – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal monitoring system for aircraft cargo bay fire safety
    Optical Engineering, 1991
    Co-Authors: Michael L. Parsons, Vincent Y. Tseng
    Abstract:

    Fire detection systems as they are now configured in aircraft cargo bays do not always meet the current FAA requirements, including a specification that a fire be detected within 1 mm after initiation. A new FAA Airworthiness Directive requires upgraded fire detection systems on all combination passenger/cargo aircraft built by Boeing and McDonnell Douglas. A thermal monitoring/fire detection system that meets the new FAA regulations has been developed. It is based on infrared detection technology coupled with a Fresnel scanning optical system. The system uses a dual computer controller unit, which permits totally redundant thermal monitoring within the cargo bay. The system is responsive to either overheat or fire conditions, has three levels of fire alarm signal, incorporates complete optical coverage and electronic circuitry redundancy, and provides fire location information. It is highly reliable and immune to false alarm stimuli. Each sensor is designed to cover a portion of the cargo bay approximately 20 ft in diameter from 12 ft above. A system description is presented, and performance characteristics for fire/overheat and false alarm immunity are discussed.

D.g. Moore – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nondestructive inspection of piper PA25 forward spar fittings
    Materials evaluation, 1995
    Co-Authors: D.g. Moore
    Abstract:

    The Federal Aviation Administration`s (FAA`s) Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories applied two nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques to inspect a forward spar fuselage attachment fitting. The techniques used were based on radiography and ultrasonic test methods. The combination of these techniques did reveal material thinning of two spar fittings from Piper PA25 aircraft. However, crack detection near a notch design feature could not be performed. Based on the results of these experiments, an ultrasonic test procedure was subsequently developed for the material thinning. The procedure has since been incorporated by the FAA into a revision of Airworthiness Directive 93-21-12.