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Alcohol Drinking – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Ciorana Roman-ortiz – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Midbrain circuit regulation of individual Alcohol Drinking behaviors in mice
    Nature Communications, 2017
    Co-Authors: Barbara Juarez, Carole Morel, Stacy M. Ku, Yutong Liu, Hongxing Zhang, Sarah Montgomery, Hilledna Gregoire, Efrain Ribeiro, Marshall Crumiller, Ciorana Roman-ortiz

    Abstract:

    Alcohol-use disorder (AUD) is the most prevalent substance-use disorder worldwide. There is substantial individual variability in Alcohol Drinking behaviors in the population, the neural circuit mechanisms of which remain elusive. Utilizing in vivo electrophysiological techniques, we find that low Alcohol Drinking (LAD) mice have dramatically higher ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neuron firing and burst activity. Unexpectedly, VTA dopamine neuron activity in high Alcohol Drinking (HAD) mice does not differ from Alcohol naive mice. Optogenetically enhancing VTA dopamine neuron burst activity in HAD mice decreases Alcohol Drinking behaviors. Circuit-specific recordings reveal that spontaneous activity of nucleus accumbens-projecting VTA (VTA-NAc) neurons is selectively higher in LAD mice. Specifically activating this projection is sufficient to reduce Alcohol consumption in HAD mice. Furthermore, we uncover ionic and cellular mechanisms that suggest unique neuroadaptations between the Alcohol Drinking groups. Together, these data identify a neural circuit responsible for individual Alcohol Drinking behaviors.

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Masahiro Yasuhara – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The age of Drinking onset and housing condition influences rat Alcohol Drinking behavior.
    Nihon Arukoru Yakubutsu Igakkai zasshi = Japanese journal of alcohol studies & drug dependence, 2003
    Co-Authors: Kanji Yoshimoto, Setsuo Komura, Masahiro Yasuhara

    Abstract:

    We investigated whether age of Drinking onset and/or the housing condition in experimental animals affected Alcohol Drinking behavior to extrapolate the experimental findings to Alcohol Drinking patterns of aged people. At the time of the experiments, all 1-, 4-, 10- and the 16-month-old rats were divided into two groups, isolated and aggregated groups, and then maintained in the same housing conditions for six months. The amounts of voluntary Alcohol consumption (g/kg/day) of all rats were investigated by two-bottle methods at 7, 10, 16 and 22 months old. No significant difference in Alcohol Drinking behavior was shown in the 7- and 10-month-old rats. A decrease in voluntary Alcohol consumption was shown in the 16-month-old rats of the aggregated groups. In the 22-month old rats, a significant suppression of voluntary Alcohol consumption was found in the aggregated groups compared with the isolated group. The results demonstrate that an important determinant of EtOH intake is related to environmental factors. It was suggested that Alcohol Drinking behavior strongly depends on the housing conditions and the age of onset of Alcohol Drinking.

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  • Increase of Rat Alcohol Drinking Behavior Depends on the Age of Drinking Onset
    Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 2002
    Co-Authors: Kanji Yoshimoto, Tadashi Yano, Masafumi Hori, Yoshihide Sorimachi, Tetsushi Watanabe, Masahiro Yasuhara

    Abstract:

    Background: Although Alcohol Drinking onset in younger people is associated with an increased risk of Alcohol-related injuries, other factors, such as habituation and susceptibility to Alcohol, in the process of aging have not been adequately examined in animal models. In the present study, we determined whether age of Drinking onset affected Alcohol Drinking behavior and led to Alcohol tolerance in experimental animals, and extrapolated some of the findings to human Alcohol Drinking patterns. Methods: In the first experiment, 18 rats that were naive to Alcohol were tested at the age of 1, 4, and 10 months with 4 hr of access to 10% (v/v) Alcohol. After the time access tests, these animals (1, 4, and 10 months of age) were housed individually and given free access to 10% Alcohol solution and tap water. At 3 and 6 months later, all rats that had experienced Alcohol Drinking were studied for the voluntary consumption of the Alcohol solution, Alcohol preference, under the two-bottle method in a second experiment. Results: In the 4-hr Alcohol-access test, Alcohol intake (g/kg/hr) was significantly increased at 0.5 and 1 hr in 1- and 4-month-old naive rats compared with 10-month-old naive rats. The daily Alcohol intake (g/kg/day) of rats with Drinking onset at I month of age was significantly increased at 3 and 6 months after the voluntary Alcohol consumption. The daily Alcohol intake in the rats with Drinking onset at 4 months of age was significantly increased at 6 months only. However, the daily Alcohol intake did not change in the rats with Drinking onset at 10 months of age through the Alcohol preference test. Conclusions: Alcohol Drinking behavior in experimental animals depends on the age of Alcohol Drinking onset.

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  • Increase of rat Alcohol Drinking behavior depends on the age of Drinking onset.
    Alcoholism clinical and experimental research, 2002
    Co-Authors: Kanji Yoshimoto, Tadashi Yano, Masafumi Hori, Yoshihide Sorimachi, Tetsushi Watanabe, Masahiro Yasuhara

    Abstract:

    Although Alcohol Drinking onset in younger people is associated with an increased risk of Alcohol-related injuries, other factors, such as habituation and susceptibility to Alcohol, in the process of aging have not been adequately examined in animal models. In the present study, we determined whether age of Drinking onset affected Alcohol Drinking behavior and led to Alcohol tolerance in experimental animals, and extrapolated some of the findings to human Alcohol Drinking patterns.
    In the first experiment, 18 rats that were naive to Alcohol were tested at the age of 1, 4, and 10 months with 4 hr of access to 10% (v/v) Alcohol. After the time access tests, these animals (1, 4, and 10 months of age) were housed individually and given free access to 10% Alcohol solution and tap water. At 3 and 6 months later, all rats that had experienced Alcohol Drinking were studied for the voluntary consumption of the Alcohol solution, Alcohol preference, under the two-bottle method in a second experiment.
    In the 4-hr Alcohol-access test, Alcohol intake (g/kg/hr) was significantly increased at 0.5 and 1 hr in 1- and 4-month-old naive rats compared with 10-month-old naive rats. The daily Alcohol intake (g/kg/day) of rats with Drinking onset at 1 month of age was significantly increased at 3 and 6 months after the voluntary Alcohol consumption. The daily Alcohol intake in the rats with Drinking onset at 4 months of age was significantly increased at 6 months only. However, the daily Alcohol intake did not change in the rats with Drinking onset at 10 months of age through the Alcohol preference test.
    Alcohol Drinking behavior in experimental animals depends on the age of Alcohol Drinking onset.

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Alan I. Green – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effects of iloperidone, combined with desipramine, on Alcohol Drinking in the Syrian golden hamster.
    Neuropharmacology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jibran Y. Khokhar, Alan I. Green

    Abstract:

    Alcohol use disorder in patients with schizophrenia dramatically worsens their clinical course, and few treatment options are available. Clozapine appears to reduce Alcohol use in these patients, but its toxicity limits its use. To create a safer clozapine-like drug, we tested whether the antipsychotic iloperidone, a drug that combines a weak dopamine D2 receptor blockade and a potent norepinephrine alpha-2 receptor blockade would reduce Alcohol Drinking, and whether its effect on Alcohol Drinking could be increased if combined with an agent to facilitate norepinephrine activity. Syrian golden hamsters (useful animal model for screening drugs that reduce Alcohol Drinking in patients with schizophrenia) were given free access to water and Alcohol (15% v/v) until stable Drinking was established. Animals (n = 6-7/group), matched according to Alcohol intake, were treated daily with each drug (iloperidone; clozapine; haloperidol; desipramine [norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor]; with idazoxan [norepinephrine alpha-2 receptor antagonist]) or with a two-drug (iloperidone + desipramine; iloperidone + idazoxan) combination for 14 days. Moderate doses of iloperidone (1-5 mg/kg) significantly reduced Alcohol Drinking (p 

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  • Desipramine enhances the ability of paliperidone to decrease Alcohol Drinking.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research, 2015
    Co-Authors: David T. Chau, Ree Dawson, Jibran Y. Khokhar, Danielle Gulick, Alan I. Green

    Abstract:

    Alcohol use disorder commonly occurs in patients with schizophrenia and dramatically worsens their course. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine has been associated with reduced Drinking in these patients, but its toxicity reduces its use. We have attempted to create a clozapine-like drug by combining agents that capture components of clozapine’s pharmacologic action, including its weak dopamine D2 blockade and noradrenergic modulation. The current study assessed whether paliperidone, a dopamine D2 receptor and adrenergic alpha-2 receptor antagonist like clozapine, would attenuate Alcohol Drinking in the Alcohol-preferring P rat and the Syrian golden hamster, and whether desipramine, a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, would potentiate the ability of paliperidone to attenuate Alcohol Drinking in the P rat and the Syrian golden hamster. Daily subcutaneous injections of paliperidone (5 mg/kg for the rat; 1 mg/kg for the hamster) over 20 days slightly and transiently attenuated initiation of Alcohol consumption in both animals. Desipramine (3 mg/kg) or lower doses of paliperidone alone did not affect Alcohol Drinking. However, the combination of desipramine (3 mg/kg) and paliperidone essentially prevented initiation of Alcohol Drinking and acquisition of Alcohol preference in the P rat (2.5 or 5 mg/kg), and almost as dramatically suppressed chronic Alcohol intake and Alcohol preference in the hamster (2.5 mg/kg). Taken together, the current data suggest that (1) the desipramine and paliperidone combination attenuates Alcohol Drinking in a synergistic manner, and (2) desipramine and paliperidone may serve as an effective new treatment for Alcohol use disorder in patients with schizophrenia.

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  • Clozapine reduces Alcohol Drinking in Syrian golden hamsters.
    Psychiatry Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Alan I. Green, David T. Chau, Ming Keung, Ree Dawson, Raquelle I. Mesholam, Joseph J. Schildkraut

    Abstract:

    Abstract Alcohol abuse contributes substantially to the overall morbidity of schizophrenia. While typical antipsychotic medications do not limit Alcohol use in patients with schizophrenia, emerging data suggest that the atypical antipsychotic clozapine does. To further elucidate the effects of these antipsychotics on Alcohol use, we initiated a study in Alcohol-preferring rodents. Syrian golden hamsters were given free-choice, unlimited access to Alcohol. Nine days of treatment (s.c. injection) with clozapine (2–4 mg/kg/day), but not haloperidol (0.2–0.4 mg/kg/day), reduced Alcohol Drinking. Clozapine reduced Alcohol Drinking by 88% (from 11.3±1.7 to 1.4±0.2 g/kg/day) while increasing both water and food intake. Alcohol Drinking gradually (during 24 days) returned toward baseline in the clozapine-treated animals when vehicle was substituted for clozapine. Further increasing the doses of haloperidol (0.6–1.0 mg/kg/day) had no effect on Alcohol Drinking; moreover, very low doses of haloperidol (0.025–0.1 mg/kg/day) tested in separate groups of hamsters also had no effect on Alcohol Drinking. This study demonstrates that clozapine, but not haloperidol, can effectively and reversibly decrease Alcohol consumption in Alcohol-preferring hamsters. The results are compatible with the observations that clozapine, but not haloperidol, limits Alcohol use in patients with schizophrenia. These data further suggest that clozapine may serve as a prototype for developing novel treatments for Alcohol abuse.

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