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Alloy Cast Iron

The Experts below are selected from a list of 249 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Zhengyang Li – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • investigation of the tribology behaviour of the graphene nanosheets as oil additives on textured Alloy Cast Iron surface
    Applied Surface Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Dan Zheng, Mingxue Shen, Zhengyang Li

    Abstract:

    Abstract Tribological properties of graphene nanosheets (GNS) as lubricating oil additives on textured surfaces were investigated using a UMT-2 tribotester. The lubricating fluids keeping a constant temperature of 100 °C were applied to a GCr15 steel ball and an RTCr2 Alloy Cast Iron plate with various texture designs (original surface, dimple density of 22.1%, 19.6% and 44.2%). The oil with GNS adding showed good tribological properties (wear reduced 50%), especially on the textured surfaces (the reduction in wear was high at over 90%). A combined effect between GNS additives and laser surface texturing (LST) was revealed, which is not a simple superposition of the two factors mentioned. A mechanism is proposed to explain for these results −the graphene layers sheared at the sliding contact interfaces, and form a protective film, which is closely related with the GNS structures and surface texture patterns.

S.k. Schaefer – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Wear and Wear Mechanism Simulation of Heavy-Duty Engine Intake Valve and Seat Inserts
    Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, 1997
    Co-Authors: Y.s. Wang, S. Narasimhan, J.m. Larson, S.k. Schaefer

    Abstract:

    A silicon-chromium Alloy frequently used for heavy-duty diesel engine intake valves was tested against eight different insert materials with a valve seat wear simulator. Wear resistance of these combinations was ranked. For each test, the valve seat temperature was controlled at approximately 510 °C, the number of cycles was 864,000 (or 24 h), and the test load was 17,640 N. The combination of the silicon-chromium valve against a Cast Iron insert produced the least valve seat wear, whereas a cobalt-base Alloy insert produced the highest valve seat wear. In the overall valve seat recession ranking, however, the combination of the silicon-chromium valve and an Iron-base chromium-nickel Alloy insert had the least total seat recession, whereas the silicon-chromium valve against cobalt-base Alloy, Cast Iron, and nickel-base Alloy inserts had significant seat recession. Hardness and microstructure compatibility of valve and insert materials are believed to be significant factors in reducing valve and insert wear. The test results indicate that the mechanisms of valve seat and insert wear are a complex combination of adhesion and plastic deformation. Adhesion was confirmed by material transfer, while plastic deformation was verified by shear strain (or radial flow) and abrasion. The oxide films formed during testing also played a significant role. They prevented direct metal-to-metal contact and reduced the coefficient of friction on seat surfaces, thereby reducing adhesive and deformation-controlled wear.

Dan Zheng – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • investigation of the tribology behaviour of the graphene nanosheets as oil additives on textured Alloy Cast Iron surface
    Applied Surface Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Dan Zheng, Mingxue Shen, Zhengyang Li

    Abstract:

    Abstract Tribological properties of graphene nanosheets (GNS) as lubricating oil additives on textured surfaces were investigated using a UMT-2 tribotester. The lubricating fluids keeping a constant temperature of 100 °C were applied to a GCr15 steel ball and an RTCr2 Alloy Cast Iron plate with various texture designs (original surface, dimple density of 22.1%, 19.6% and 44.2%). The oil with GNS adding showed good tribological properties (wear reduced 50%), especially on the textured surfaces (the reduction in wear was high at over 90%). A combined effect between GNS additives and laser surface texturing (LST) was revealed, which is not a simple superposition of the two factors mentioned. A mechanism is proposed to explain for these results −the graphene layers sheared at the sliding contact interfaces, and form a protective film, which is closely related with the GNS structures and surface texture patterns.