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G. Pizelle – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nitrogenase and nitrate reductase activities in young Alnus glutinosa, relationship and effect of light/dark treatments
    Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, 1995
    Co-Authors: S. Benamar, G. Thiery, G. Pizelle

    Abstract:

    Relations between in vivo nitrogenase (N 2 -ase ; EC 1.18.6.1) and nitrate reductase (NR ; EC 1.6.6.1) activities were studied in young nodulated Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. Positive correlations linked N 2 -ase activity, constitutive (non-inducible by nitrate) leaf NR activity and plant growth. Light/dark treatments applied to the whole shoot or, separately, to the upper and lower part of shoot led to the finding that (a) the constitutive leaf NR activity depended on direct illumination of the leaf and did not appear subordinate to the N 2 -ase activity ; (b) the N 2 -ase activity was much more efficiently supported by the illumination of the upper (young) leaves than by that of the lower (mature) leaves ; (c) the maintenance of nitrate-inducible root NR activity required leaf illumination. The variations of both N 2 -ase and root NR activities in response to light/dark treatments emphasize the importance of the photosynthesis for the reduction of dinitrogen and nitrate in nodulated roots of Alnus glutinosa.

  • Relationship between nitrite and nitrate reductase activities in leaves of Alnus glutinosa and Robinia pseudoacacia
    Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: G. Pizelle, G. Thiery

    Abstract:

    In vivo and in vitro methods were devised to investigate the nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1) (NiR) activity of leaves of Alnus glutinosa and Robinia pseudoacacia, its relations with light, photosynthetic inhibitors and nitrate supply, and its seasonal variations compared with those of the nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) (NR) activity. In both species, NiR activity was found in leaves of young plants dependent upon symbiotic nitrogen fixation, as well as in field leaves; moreover, its level was not increased by nitrate supply to excised leaves, thereby implying its constitutive nature. NR and NiR activities were present in the field leaves from the bud break to the autumn

G. Thiery – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nitrogenase and nitrate reductase activities in young Alnus glutinosa, relationship and effect of light/dark treatments
    Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, 1995
    Co-Authors: S. Benamar, G. Thiery, G. Pizelle

    Abstract:

    Relations between in vivo nitrogenase (N 2 -ase ; EC 1.18.6.1) and nitrate reductase (NR ; EC 1.6.6.1) activities were studied in young nodulated Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. Positive correlations linked N 2 -ase activity, constitutive (non-inducible by nitrate) leaf NR activity and plant growth. Light/dark treatments applied to the whole shoot or, separately, to the upper and lower part of shoot led to the finding that (a) the constitutive leaf NR activity depended on direct illumination of the leaf and did not appear subordinate to the N 2 -ase activity ; (b) the N 2 -ase activity was much more efficiently supported by the illumination of the upper (young) leaves than by that of the lower (mature) leaves ; (c) the maintenance of nitrate-inducible root NR activity required leaf illumination. The variations of both N 2 -ase and root NR activities in response to light/dark treatments emphasize the importance of the photosynthesis for the reduction of dinitrogen and nitrate in nodulated roots of Alnus glutinosa.

  • Relationship between nitrite and nitrate reductase activities in leaves of Alnus glutinosa and Robinia pseudoacacia
    Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: G. Pizelle, G. Thiery

    Abstract:

    In vivo and in vitro methods were devised to investigate the nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1) (NiR) activity of leaves of Alnus glutinosa and Robinia pseudoacacia, its relations with light, photosynthetic inhibitors and nitrate supply, and its seasonal variations compared with those of the nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) (NR) activity. In both species, NiR activity was found in leaves of young plants dependent upon symbiotic nitrogen fixation, as well as in field leaves; moreover, its level was not increased by nitrate supply to excised leaves, thereby implying its constitutive nature. NR and NiR activities were present in the field leaves from the bud break to the autumn

Torgny Unestam – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comparative studies of ectomycorrhiza formation in Alnus glutinosa and pinus resinosa with paxillus involutus
    Mycorrhiza, 1999
    Co-Authors: Hugues B Massicotte, Lewis Melville, R L Peterson, Torgny Unestam

    Abstract:

    Mycorrhiza ontogeny and details of Hartig net and mantle structure were compared in ectomycorrhizas synthesized in growth pouches between the broad host range fungus Paxillus involutus and the tree species European black alder (Alnus glutinosa) and red pine (Pinus resinosa). In Alnus glutinosa, a paraepidermal Hartig net was restricted to the proximal (basal) portion of first-order laterals; the hypodermal layer appeared to be a barrier to fungal penetration. Phi-thickenings were present in some cortical cells but these were not related to lack of fungal ingress into the cortex. The mantle was often present close to the root apex but in many roots it was loosely organized and patchy. In several instances, the mantle formed around the root apex was only temporary; renewed root growth occurred without the formation of a mantle. In Pinus resinosa, the Hartig net developed between cortical cell layers of monopodial and dichotomously branched first–order laterals. Fungal hyphae in the Hartig net exhibited a complex labyrinthine mode of growth. The mantle had a pseudoparenchymatous structure and covered the root, including apices of dichotomously branched roots. The Paxillus–Pinus resinosa interaction had all the characteristics of a compatible ectomycorrhizal association. The Paxillus–Alnus glutinosa interaction, however, showed only aspects of superficial ectomycorrhizas, including the presence of a minimal (sometimes absent) and mostly proximal Hartig net and variable mantle development. Sclerotia were produced in the extraradical mycelium of Paxillus involutus when associated with either Alnus glutinosa or Pinus resinosa.