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Amino Acids

The Experts below are selected from a list of 249 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

M. Kawai – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Taste enhancements between various Amino Acids and IMP.
    Chemical Senses, 2002
    Co-Authors: M. Kawai, Atsushi Okiyama, Yoichi Ueda

    Abstract:

    It is well known that a strong synergistic interaction of umami occurs between L-α –Amino Acids with an acidic side chain, such as L-Glu or L-Asp, and 5′-mononucleotides, such as inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP). We tested taste interactions between various L-α –Amino Acids and IMP by the psychophysical method and found that taste enhancement occurred when IMP was added to several sweet Amino Acids, such as L-Ala, L-Ser and Gly. The enhanced quality of taste was recognized as umami, and was not blocked by the sweetness inhibitor ±2-(p-methoxyphenoxy)propanoic acid. The total taste intensities of various concentrations of the Amino acid and IMP mixtures were measured using magnitude estimation. The results showed that the potentiation ratios were larger than 1 in the cases of L-Ala, L-Ser and Gly. However, the ratio was ~1 in the case of D-Ala, which had an enhanced taste of sweetness. Thus the umami taste enhancement of several sweet L-α –Amino Acids by IMP was synergistic rather than additive as that of acidic Amino Acids.

  • Taste Enhancements Between Various Amino Acids and IMP
    Chemical Senses, 2002
    Co-Authors: M. Kawai

    Abstract:

    It is well known that a strong synergistic interaction of umami occurs between L-alpha-Amino Acids with an acidic side chain, such as L-Glu or L-Asp, and 5′-mononucleotides, such as inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP). We tested taste interactions between various L-alpha-Amino Acids and IMP by the psychophysical method and found that taste enhancement occurred when IMP was added to several sweet Amino Acids, such as L-Ala, L-Ser and Gly. The enhanced quality of taste was recognized as umami, and was not blocked by the sweetness inhibitor +/-2-(p-methoxyphenoxy)propanoic acid. The total taste intensities of various concentrations of the Amino acid and IMP mixtures were measured using magnitude estimation. The results showed that the potentiation ratios were larger than 1 in the cases of L-Ala, L-Ser and Gly. However, the ratio was approximately 1 in the case of D-Ala, which had an enhanced taste of sweetness. Thus the umami taste enhancement of several sweet L-alpha-Amino Acids by IMP was synergistic rather than additive as that of acidic Amino Acids.

Parvaiz Ahmad – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Differential distribution of Amino Acids in plants
    Amino Acids, 2017
    Co-Authors: Vinod Kumar, Avish P. Sharma, Ravdeep Kaur, Ashwani Kumar Thukral, Renu Bhardwaj, Parvaiz Ahmad

    Abstract:

    Plants are a rich source of Amino Acids and their individual abundance in plants is of great significance especially in terms of food. Therefore, it is of utmost necessity to create a database of the relative Amino acid contents in plants as reported in literature. Since in most of the cases complete analysis of profiles of Amino Acids in plants was not reported, the units used and the methods applied and the plant parts used were different, Amino acid contents were converted into relative units with respect to lysine for statistical analysis. The most abundant Amino Acids in plants are glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Pearson’s correlation analysis among different Amino Acids showed that there were no negative correlations between the Amino Acids. Cluster analysis (CA) applied to relative Amino acid contents of different families. Alismataceae, Cyperaceae, Capparaceae and Cactaceae families had close proximity with each other on the basis of their relative Amino acid contents. First three components of principal component analysis (PCA) explained 79.5% of the total variance. Factor analysis (FA) explained four main underlying factors for Amino acid analysis. Factor-1 accounted for 29.4% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on glycine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine and valine. Factor-2 explained 25.8% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on alanine, aspartic acid, serine and tyrosine. 14.2% of the total variance was explained by factor-3 and had maximum loadings on arginine and histidine. Factor-4 accounted 8.3% of the total variance and had maximum loading on the proline Amino acid. The relative content of different Amino Acids presented in this paper is alanine (1.4), arginine (1.8), asparagine (0.7), aspartic acid (2.4), cysteine (0.5), glutamic acid (2.8), glutamine (0.6), glycine (1.0), histidine (0.5), isoleucine (0.9), leucine (1.7), lysine (1.0), methionine (0.4), phenylalanine (0.9), proline (1.1), serine (1.0), threonine (1.0), tryptophan (0.3), tyrosine (0.7) and valine (1.2).

Vinod Kumar – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Differential distribution of Amino Acids in plants
    Amino Acids, 2017
    Co-Authors: Vinod Kumar, Avish P. Sharma, Ravdeep Kaur, Ashwani Kumar Thukral, Renu Bhardwaj, Parvaiz Ahmad

    Abstract:

    Plants are a rich source of Amino Acids and their individual abundance in plants is of great significance especially in terms of food. Therefore, it is of utmost necessity to create a database of the relative Amino acid contents in plants as reported in literature. Since in most of the cases complete analysis of profiles of Amino Acids in plants was not reported, the units used and the methods applied and the plant parts used were different, Amino acid contents were converted into relative units with respect to lysine for statistical analysis. The most abundant Amino Acids in plants are glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Pearson’s correlation analysis among different Amino Acids showed that there were no negative correlations between the Amino Acids. Cluster analysis (CA) applied to relative Amino acid contents of different families. Alismataceae, Cyperaceae, Capparaceae and Cactaceae families had close proximity with each other on the basis of their relative Amino acid contents. First three components of principal component analysis (PCA) explained 79.5% of the total variance. Factor analysis (FA) explained four main underlying factors for Amino acid analysis. Factor-1 accounted for 29.4% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on glycine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine and valine. Factor-2 explained 25.8% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on alanine, aspartic acid, serine and tyrosine. 14.2% of the total variance was explained by factor-3 and had maximum loadings on arginine and histidine. Factor-4 accounted 8.3% of the total variance and had maximum loading on the proline Amino acid. The relative content of different Amino Acids presented in this paper is alanine (1.4), arginine (1.8), asparagine (0.7), aspartic acid (2.4), cysteine (0.5), glutamic acid (2.8), glutamine (0.6), glycine (1.0), histidine (0.5), isoleucine (0.9), leucine (1.7), lysine (1.0), methionine (0.4), phenylalanine (0.9), proline (1.1), serine (1.0), threonine (1.0), tryptophan (0.3), tyrosine (0.7) and valine (1.2).