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Christophe Tg Petit – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Electrochemical Synthesis of Ammonia Based on Co3Mo3N Catalyst and LiAlO2–(Li,Na,K)2CO3 Composite Electrolyte
    Electrocatalysis, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ibrahim Ali Ahmed Amar, Rong Lan, Christophe Tg Petit, Shanwen Tao

    Abstract:

    Cobalt molybdenum nitride (Co3Mo3N) catalyst was synthesised through ammonolysis of the corresponding precursors by flowing pure Ammonia gas. The catalyst was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ammonia was successfully synthesised from wet hydrogen and dry nitrogen at atmospheric pressure using Co3Mo3N–Ag composite as cathode, Ag–Pd alloy as anode and LiAlO2–(Li/Na/K)2CO3 composite as an electrolyte. Ammonia Formation was investigated at 400, 425 and 450 °C, and the maximum observed Ammonia Formation rate was 3.27×10−10 mol s−1 cm−2 at 450 °C when applied at 0.8 V. The catalytic activity of Co3Mo3N for electrochemical Ammonia synthesis is lower than that of Pd. The successful synthesis of Ammonia demonstrates that LiAlO2–(Li/Na/K)2CO3 composite exhibits protonic or/and oxygen ion conduction.

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  • Electrochemical synthesis of Ammonia from wet nitrogen using La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ–Ce0.8Gd0.18Ca0.02O2−δ composite cathode
    RSC Adv., 2014
    Co-Authors: Ibrahim Ali Ahmed Amar, Rong Lan, Christophe Tg Petit, Gregory Bruce Mann, Shanwen Tao

    Abstract:

    Electrochemical synthesis of Ammonia from wet nitrogen in an electrolytic cell using a La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ–Ce0.8Gd0.18Ca0.02O2−δ composite cathode and an oxide–carbonate composite electrolyte has been investigated. La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ was prepared via a combined EDTA–citrate complexing sol–gel process, characterised by X-ray diffraction and SEM. A tri-layer electrolytic cell was fabricated by a one-step dry-pressing and co-firing process. Ammonia was successfully synthesised from wet nitrogen under atmospheric pressure. Ammonia Formation was observed at 375, 400, 425 and 450 °C and the maximum Ammonia Formation rate of 7 × 10−11 mol s−1 cm−2 was observed at 400 °C when a voltage of 1.4 V was applied. This Ammonia Formation rate corresponds to a Faradaic efficiency of ∼0.14% at a current density of 14.25 mA cm−2.

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  • Electrochemical synthesis of Ammonia from wet nitrogen using La₀.₆Sr₀.₄FeO₃₋δ–Ce₀.₈Gd₀.₁₈Ca₀.₀₂O₂₋δ composite cathode
    RSC Advances, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ibrahim Ali Ahmed Amar, Rong Lan, Christophe Tg Petit, Gregory Bruce Mann, Shanwen Tao

    Abstract:

    Electrochemical synthesis of Ammonia from wet nitrogen in an electrolytic cell using a La₀.₆Sr₀.₄FeO₃₋δ–Ce₀.₈Gd₀.₁₈Ca₀.₀₂O₂₋δ composite cathode and an oxide–carbonate composite electrolyte has been investigated. La₀.₆Sr₀.₄FeO₃₋δ was prepared via a combined EDTA–citrate complexing sol–gel process, characterised by X-ray diffraction and SEM. A tri-layer electrolytic cell was fabricated by a one-step dry-pressing and co-firing process. Ammonia was successfully synthesised from wet nitrogen under atmospheric pressure. Ammonia Formation was observed at 375, 400, 425 and 450 °C and the maximum Ammonia Formation rate of 7 × 10⁻¹¹ mol s⁻¹ cm⁻² was observed at 400 °C when a voltage of 1.4 V was applied. This Ammonia Formation rate corresponds to a Faradaic efficiency of ∼0.14% at a current density of 14.25 mA cm⁻².

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Ibrahim Ali Ahmed Amar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Electrochemical Synthesis of Ammonia Based on Co3Mo3N Catalyst and LiAlO2–(Li,Na,K)2CO3 Composite Electrolyte
    Electrocatalysis, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ibrahim Ali Ahmed Amar, Rong Lan, Christophe Tg Petit, Shanwen Tao

    Abstract:

    Cobalt molybdenum nitride (Co3Mo3N) catalyst was synthesised through ammonolysis of the corresponding precursors by flowing pure Ammonia gas. The catalyst was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ammonia was successfully synthesised from wet hydrogen and dry nitrogen at atmospheric pressure using Co3Mo3N–Ag composite as cathode, Ag–Pd alloy as anode and LiAlO2–(Li/Na/K)2CO3 composite as an electrolyte. Ammonia Formation was investigated at 400, 425 and 450 °C, and the maximum observed Ammonia Formation rate was 3.27×10−10 mol s−1 cm−2 at 450 °C when applied at 0.8 V. The catalytic activity of Co3Mo3N for electrochemical Ammonia synthesis is lower than that of Pd. The successful synthesis of Ammonia demonstrates that LiAlO2–(Li/Na/K)2CO3 composite exhibits protonic or/and oxygen ion conduction.

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  • synthesis of Ammonia directly from wet air at intermediate temperature
    Applied Catalysis B-environmental, 2014
    Co-Authors: Khaled A Alkhazmi, Ibrahim Ali Ahmed Amar

    Abstract:

    Abstract For the first time, Ammonia has been directly synthesised from wet air at intermediate temperature. Ce0.8Gd0.2O2−δ (CGO)–(Li,Na,K)2CO3 electrolyte together with a new perovskite oxide Pr0.6Ba0.4Fe0.8Cu0.2O3−δ were used for electrochemical synthesis of Ammonia. An Ammonia Formation rate of 1.07 × 10−6 mol s−1 m−2 was obtained at 400 °C when applied a voltage of 1.4 V, while wet air was introduced to the single chamber reactor. This is just slightly lower than the value of 1.83 × 10−6 mol s−1 m−2 when wet N2 was fed under the same experimental conditions. These values are two to three orders of magnitude higher than the reported Ammonia Formation rates when synthesised from N2 and H2O at ∼600 °C. The perovskite catalysts are also low cost compared to the Ru/MgO and Pt/C catalysts in previous reports.

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  • Electrochemical synthesis of Ammonia from wet nitrogen using La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ–Ce0.8Gd0.18Ca0.02O2−δ composite cathode
    RSC Adv., 2014
    Co-Authors: Ibrahim Ali Ahmed Amar, Rong Lan, Christophe Tg Petit, Gregory Bruce Mann, Shanwen Tao

    Abstract:

    Electrochemical synthesis of Ammonia from wet nitrogen in an electrolytic cell using a La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ–Ce0.8Gd0.18Ca0.02O2−δ composite cathode and an oxide–carbonate composite electrolyte has been investigated. La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ was prepared via a combined EDTA–citrate complexing sol–gel process, characterised by X-ray diffraction and SEM. A tri-layer electrolytic cell was fabricated by a one-step dry-pressing and co-firing process. Ammonia was successfully synthesised from wet nitrogen under atmospheric pressure. Ammonia Formation was observed at 375, 400, 425 and 450 °C and the maximum Ammonia Formation rate of 7 × 10−11 mol s−1 cm−2 was observed at 400 °C when a voltage of 1.4 V was applied. This Ammonia Formation rate corresponds to a Faradaic efficiency of ∼0.14% at a current density of 14.25 mA cm−2.

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Angela Schwarm – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • In vitro ruminal fermentation and methane inhibitory effect of three species of microalgae
    Canadian Journal of Animal Science, 2020
    Co-Authors: Ali Kiani, Michael Kreuzer, Lukas Eggerschwiler, Christina Wolf, Katrin Giller, Angela Schwarm

    Abstract:

    In this study, in vitro ruminal fermentation, anti-methanogenesis, and Ammonia Formation of two autotrophic algae [Nannochloropsis gaditana (NG), Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PT)], and one heterotrop…

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  • Dose-response effects of woody and herbaceous forage plants on in vitro ruminal methane and Ammonia Formation, and their short-term palatability in lactating cows
    animal, 2019
    Co-Authors: Melissa Terranova, Michael Kreuzer, Ueli Braun, Shaopu Wang, Lukas Eggerschwiler, Angela Schwarm

    Abstract:

    Plant secondary compounds ( PSC ) are prevalent in many woody, temperate-climate plant species and play a crucial role in dietary attempts to mitigate methane emissions in ruminants. However, their application requires sufficient palatability and feeding value. In the present study, leaves from silver birch ( Betula pendula ), hazel ( Corylus avellana ), blackcurrant ( Ribes nigrum ), green grape vine ( Vitis vinifera ) and the herbs rosebay willow ( Epilobium angustifolium ) and wood avens ( Geum urbanum ) were tested in various doses with the Hohenheim gas test method in vitro and their short-term palatability in dairy cows. For the palatability experiment, the plants were pelleted with lucerne in different proportions to obtain the same phenol content, but realised contents differed from expected contents. The pellets were provided separately from a mixed basal ration (0.4 : 0.6) to each cow, in a randomised order, for 3 days per plant. All plants mitigated in vitro methane and Ammonia Formation, often in a linear dose response. These levels of effects differed among plants. Significant effects were observed at 100 (hazel, rosebay willow) to 400 g/kg of plant material. The test plants had a lower feeding value than the high-quality basal diet. This was indicated by in vitro organic matter digestibility, short-chain fatty acid Formation and calculated contents of net energy of lactation. Simultaneously, the linear depression of Ammonia Formation indicated a dose-dependent increase of utilisable CP. Only blackcurrant and birch were less preferred to lucerne. However, this aversion subsided on day 3 of offer. The rosebay willow pellets had the highest phenol content but were not the least palatable. Accordingly, PSC may not be the main determinants of palatability for the plants tested. Plants did not differ significantly in their short-term effects on milk yield and composition, and all of the plants substantially reduced milk urea content. Overall, the results suggest that hazel and vine leaves, and rosebay willow and wood avens herbs should be tested for their potential to mitigate methane and N emissions in vivo .

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  • In vitro screening of temperate climate forages from a variety of woody plants for their potential to mitigate ruminal methane and Ammonia Formation
    The Journal of Agricultural Science, 2018
    Co-Authors: Melissa Terranova, Michael Kreuzer, Ueli Braun, Angela Schwarm

    Abstract:

    Feeding phenol-containing plants to ruminants has the potential to mitigate both methane and Ammonia Formation. In the present study, mostly woody plants, such as the leaves of trees and shrubs, were tested for their influence on in vitro fermentation. The plants selected grow naturally under temperate climatic conditions, are usually available in bulk and do not directly compete with human food production. The detailed screening included whole plants or parts of different plant species reporting their effects on methane and/or Ammonia Formation. The plant materials were added at 167 mg/g of total dry matter (DM) to a common total mixed ration and incubated for 24 h with the Hohenheim gas test method. The results from in vitro fermentation were also used to determine the net energy of lactation and utilizable crude protein in the complete diets. Thirteen out of 18 test materials did not impair the organic matter (OM) digestibility of the diet. Ammonia concentrations decreased up to 35% when adding any of the test materials. Methane Formation per unit of feed DM and per unit of digestible OM was lowered by 13 of the 18 test materials from 12 to 28% and 5 to 20%, respectively. In conclusion, a number of plant materials tested have the potential to mitigate ruminal Ammonia and methane Formation without adversely affecting digestibility. The leaves of Betula pendula , Corylus avellana , Ribes nigrum , Vitis vinifera and the aerial part of Geum urbanum were particularly promising in this respect.

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