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Amphetamine Abuse

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Denise J Jamieson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hospitalizations with Amphetamine Abuse among pregnant women
    Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Shanna Cox, Samuel F Posner, Athena P Kourtis, Denise J Jamieson

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To examine trends in pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine or cocaine Abuse and the prevalence of associated medical complications. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Hospitalization ratios per 100 deliveries for Amphetamine or cocaine Abuse from 1998 to 2004 were tested for linear trends. AmphetamineAbuse hospitalizations were compared with cocaine-Abuse hospitalizations and non-substance-Abuse hospitalizations. A chi2 analysis was used to compare hospitalization characteristics. Conditional probabilities estimated by logistic regression were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for each medical diagnosis of interest. RESULTS: From 1998 to 2004, the hospitalization ratio for cocaine Abuse decreased 44%, whereas the hospitalization ratio for Amphetamine Abuse doubled. Pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine Abuse were geographically concentrated in the West (82%), and were more likely to be among women younger than 24 years than the cocaine-Abuse or non-substance-Abuse hospitalizations. Most medical conditions were more prevalent in the AmphetamineAbuse group than the non-substance-Abuse group. When the substance Abuse groups were compared with each other, obstetric diagnoses associated with infant morbidity such as premature delivery and poor fetal growth were more common in the cocaine-Abuse group, whereas vasoconstrictive effects such as cardiovascular disorders and hypertension complicating pregnancy were more common in the AmphetamineAbuse group. CONCLUSION: As pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine Abuse continue to increase, clinicians should familiarize themselves with the adverse consequences of Amphetamine Abuse during pregnancy and evidence-based guidelines to deal with this high-risk population. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.

  • Hospitalizations with Amphetamine Abuse among pregnant women.
    Obstetrics and gynecology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Shanna Cox, Samuel F Posner, Athena P Kourtis, Denise J Jamieson

    Abstract:

    To examine trends in pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine or cocaine Abuse and the prevalence of associated medical complications.
    Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Hospitalization ratios per 100 deliveries for Amphetamine or cocaine Abuse from 1998 to 2004 were tested for linear trends. AmphetamineAbuse hospitalizations were compared with cocaine-Abuse hospitalizations and non-substance-Abuse hospitalizations. A chi2 analysis was used to compare hospitalization characteristics. Conditional probabilities estimated by logistic regression were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for each medical diagnosis of interest.
    From 1998 to 2004, the hospitalization ratio for cocaine Abuse decreased 44%, whereas the hospitalization ratio for Amphetamine Abuse doubled. Pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine Abuse were geographically concentrated in the West (82%), and were more likely to be among women younger than 24 years than the cocaine-Abuse or non-substance-Abuse hospitalizations. Most medical conditions were more prevalent in the AmphetamineAbuse group than the non-substance-Abuse group. When the substance Abuse groups were compared with each other, obstetric diagnoses associated with infant morbidity such as premature delivery and poor fetal growth were more common in the cocaine-Abuse group, whereas vasoconstrictive effects such as cardiovascular disorders and hypertension complicating pregnancy were more common in the AmphetamineAbuse group.
    As pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine Abuse continue to increase, clinicians should familiarize themselves with the adverse consequences of Amphetamine Abuse during pregnancy and evidence-based guidelines to deal with this high-risk population.
    III.

Serge Brand – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Which psychological and socio-demographic dimensions predict Amphetamine Abuse?
    European Psychiatry, 2017
    Co-Authors: Vahid Farnia, Faeze Tatari, Mostafa Alikhani, Jalal Shakeri, V.t. Ngo, D. Sadeghi Bahmani, Edith Holsboer-trachsler, Serge Brand

    Abstract:

    Introduction Amphetamine Abuse has become a serious health concern worldwide, and this holds also true for Iran. Aims Investigating psychological and socio-demographic dimensions to predict AmphetamineAbuse. Methods Hundred Amphetamine Abusers and 100 healthy controls took part in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed questionnaires covering socio-demographic and psychological dimensions. Results Compared to healthy controls, Amphetamine Abusers reported more insecure and ambivalent attachment styles, higher novelty-seeking and risky behaviour, less current social support and stable relationships, and lower emotional competencies. No differences were found for socio-demographic dimensions. Conclusions Results from this cross-sectional study underscore that Amphetamine Abuse was related to poor social relationships, poor emotional competencies and higher risky behaviour. The cross-sectional nature of the study, however, does preclude any conclusions about the causal direction of Amphetamine Abuse and poor interactional behavior.

  • The prevalence and clinical features of Amphetamine-induced obsessive compulsive disorder
    Drug and alcohol dependence, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jalal Shakeri, Vahid Farnia, Faeze Tatari, Mostafa Alikhani, Edith Holsboer-trachsler, Ali Reza Karimi, Touraj Ahmadi Juibari, Hafez Bajoghli, Serge Brand

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Amphetamine Abuse is increasing worldwide, and the occurrence of Amphetamine-induced (AI) psychiatric issues further complicates treatment. In response, the DSM 5 has introduced the classification of Amphetamine-induced obsessiveā€“compulsive disorders (AI-OCD), though little has been published on either its prevalence rates or its clinical features. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the prevalence of AI-OCD, to describe patients’ clinical features, and to compare the prevalence rate among such patients with those for OCD in the general population in Western countries and Iran. Methods A total of 547 patients with Amphetamine Abuse or dependency and with a positive urine test (mean age: 31.64 years; 75.5% males) took part in the study. A psychiatric interview was carried out, covering both socio-demographic and illness-related information. Results 18 (3.3%) patients suffered from OCD prior to Amphetamine Abuse, 491 (89.8%) had no OCD, and 38 (6.9%) suffered from AI – OCD. Neither socio-demographic nor illness-related dimensions predicted patients with diagnosed AI-OCD. The prevalence of AI – OCD was significantly higher than that for OCD in the general population (2.3% in Western countries, 1.8% in Iran). Conclusions Data suggest that prevalence rate of AI – OCD is about 7%. Neither socio-demographic nor illness-related dimensions predicted the occurrence of AI – OCD. Thus, it remains unclear why some Amphetamine Abusers develop AI – OCD while others do not.

Shanna Cox – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Hospitalizations with Amphetamine Abuse among pregnant women
    Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Shanna Cox, Samuel F Posner, Athena P Kourtis, Denise J Jamieson

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To examine trends in pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine or cocaine Abuse and the prevalence of associated medical complications. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Hospitalization ratios per 100 deliveries for Amphetamine or cocaine Abuse from 1998 to 2004 were tested for linear trends. AmphetamineAbuse hospitalizations were compared with cocaine-Abuse hospitalizations and non-substance-Abuse hospitalizations. A chi2 analysis was used to compare hospitalization characteristics. Conditional probabilities estimated by logistic regression were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for each medical diagnosis of interest. RESULTS: From 1998 to 2004, the hospitalization ratio for cocaine Abuse decreased 44%, whereas the hospitalization ratio for Amphetamine Abuse doubled. Pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine Abuse were geographically concentrated in the West (82%), and were more likely to be among women younger than 24 years than the cocaine-Abuse or non-substance-Abuse hospitalizations. Most medical conditions were more prevalent in the AmphetamineAbuse group than the non-substance-Abuse group. When the substance Abuse groups were compared with each other, obstetric diagnoses associated with infant morbidity such as premature delivery and poor fetal growth were more common in the cocaine-Abuse group, whereas vasoconstrictive effects such as cardiovascular disorders and hypertension complicating pregnancy were more common in the AmphetamineAbuse group. CONCLUSION: As pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine Abuse continue to increase, clinicians should familiarize themselves with the adverse consequences of Amphetamine Abuse during pregnancy and evidence-based guidelines to deal with this high-risk population. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.

  • Hospitalizations with Amphetamine Abuse among pregnant women.
    Obstetrics and gynecology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Shanna Cox, Samuel F Posner, Athena P Kourtis, Denise J Jamieson

    Abstract:

    To examine trends in pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine or cocaine Abuse and the prevalence of associated medical complications.
    Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Hospitalization ratios per 100 deliveries for Amphetamine or cocaine Abuse from 1998 to 2004 were tested for linear trends. AmphetamineAbuse hospitalizations were compared with cocaine-Abuse hospitalizations and non-substance-Abuse hospitalizations. A chi2 analysis was used to compare hospitalization characteristics. Conditional probabilities estimated by logistic regression were used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for each medical diagnosis of interest.
    From 1998 to 2004, the hospitalization ratio for cocaine Abuse decreased 44%, whereas the hospitalization ratio for Amphetamine Abuse doubled. Pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine Abuse were geographically concentrated in the West (82%), and were more likely to be among women younger than 24 years than the cocaine-Abuse or non-substance-Abuse hospitalizations. Most medical conditions were more prevalent in the AmphetamineAbuse group than the non-substance-Abuse group. When the substance Abuse groups were compared with each other, obstetric diagnoses associated with infant morbidity such as premature delivery and poor fetal growth were more common in the cocaine-Abuse group, whereas vasoconstrictive effects such as cardiovascular disorders and hypertension complicating pregnancy were more common in the AmphetamineAbuse group.
    As pregnancy hospitalizations with a diagnosis of Amphetamine Abuse continue to increase, clinicians should familiarize themselves with the adverse consequences of Amphetamine Abuse during pregnancy and evidence-based guidelines to deal with this high-risk population.
    III.