Amphid - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab


Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Amphid

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2364 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Amphid – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

August Coomans – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Three new species of Xiphidorus from Argentina, with comments on Xiphinema sandellum Heyns, 1966
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Eliseo Chaves, August Coomans

    Abstract:

    the other species in its smaller size, shorter spear and shorter pharyngeal bulb; it further differs from X. yepesara and X. tucunzanensis sp. nov. in shape and length of the spicules and smaller number of supplements. The generic diagnosis is amended. Reexamination of the holotype and some paratypes of Xiphinema sandel lum Heyns, 1966 revealed the faint but slit-like apertures of the Amphids, the peculiar odontostyle base, the Xiphidorus- l ike guiding apparatus and pharyngeal gland pattern. The differences in Amphid structure, odontostyle base and odontophore base exclude X. sandellum from Xiph idorus as a t present defined. The inclusion of the species in Breuinema Stega-rescu, 1980 is accepted, but not its synonymy with B. pis i. RÉSUMÉ Trois nouvelles espèces de Xiphidorus d’Argentine, et commentaire

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Three species of Tobrilidae (Nematoda: Enoplida) from Li River at Guiling, China
    Hydrobiologia, 2000
    Co-Authors: Peng Yunliang, August Coomans

    Abstract:

    Eutobrilus annetteae Joubert & Heyns, 1979 with its male reported for the first time, Semitobrilus pellucidus (Bastian, 1865) Tsalolichin, 1983, and Epitobrilus allophysis (Steiner, 1919) Tsalolichin, 1996 are described from the Li River at Guiling, China. The male of Eutobrilus annetteae is characterized by lots of crystalloids inside body, almost straight spicules about one anal body diameter long and seven equally sized supplements. Semitobrilus pellucidus from Guiling shows large variation in body width, position of Amphids, form of buccal cavity, distance between denticles, direction of vagina, arrangement of oocytes, and shape of eggs. It is different from other populations in its shorter cephalic setae, less than 60% of head width, in its shorter tail and smaller c′ value. In males, there are 6–9 supplements, reduced and irregulary spaced. Epitobrilus allophysis is characterized by its labial setae longer than 50% of head width, small, posteriorly located ovoid Amphid, single egg occupying whole space of uterus and blunt tail tip.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Aquatic nematodes from Ethiopia II
    Hydrobiologia, 1996
    Co-Authors: Eyualem Abebe, August Coomans

    Abstract:

    Eight species of the genus Monhystrella , six of which are new to science, are described from bottom samples collected from three lakes, two rivers and a hot spring in Ethiopia. Monhystrella hoogewijsi n. sp. is identified by a distinctive bulge on the lip region, position of the Amphids, offset and well developed single pharyngeal terminal bulb, tail shorter than vulva-anus distance, tail elongate-conoid for two-thirds of its length, and by the shape and size of the spinneret outlet; M. jacobsi n. sp. by its slender body, distinctively offset and distended lip region, indistinct and weakly expanding single terminal pharyngeal bulb, and shape and size of the tail and spinneret outlet; M. arsiensis n. sp. by its single terminal pharyngeal bulb, position of Amphids, shape and length of tail and spinneret outlet; M. woitorum n. sp. by its hemispherical lip region, double terminal pharyngeal bulb, shape and length of the spinneret outlet, and shape and length of tail; M. ethiopica n. sp. by its bipartite stoma, size of Amphid in relation to corresponding body width, filiform tail and shape and length of spinneret outlet. M. atteae n. sp. differs from all known Monhystrella species in having an inflated cap-like lip region and fine crystalloid bodies. M. macrura (de Man, 1880) Andrássy, 1981 and M. lepidura altherri (Juget, 1969) Jacobs, 1987 are reported from Ethiopia for the first time. Crystalloid bodies in the genus Monhystrella is reported here for the first time. Also the presence of a hyaline coelomocyte next to the germinal zone of the reproductive system is reported for the first time in the genus here in all eight species. The structures used in the taxonomy of the genus are reviewed.

    Free Register to Access Article

Bryony C Bonning – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a peptide that binds the pea aphid gut impedes entry of pea enation mosaic virus into the aphid hemocoel
    Virology, 2010
    Co-Authors: S Sivakumar, Wendy O Sparks, Allen W Miller, Bryony C Bonning

    Abstract:

    Abstract Development of ways to block virus transmission by aphids could lead to novel and broad-spectrum means of controlling plant viruses. Viruses in the Luteoviridae enhanced are obligately transmitted by aphids in a persistent manner that requires virion accumulation in the aphid hemocoel. To enter the hemocoel, the virion must bind and traverse the aphid gut epithelium. By screening a phage display library, we identified a 12-residue gut binding peptide (GBP3.1) that binds to the midgut and hindgut of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum . Binding was confirmed by labeling the aphid gut with a GBP3.1–green fluorescent protein fusion. GBP3.1 reduced uptake of Pea enation mosaic virus (Luteoviridae) from the pea aphid gut into the hemocoel. GBP3.1 also bound to the gut epithelia of the green peach aphid and the soybean aphid. These results suggest a novel strategy for inhibiting plant virus transmission by at least three major aphid pest species.

    Free Register to Access Article

S Sivakumar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a peptide that binds the pea aphid gut impedes entry of pea enation mosaic virus into the aphid hemocoel
    Virology, 2010
    Co-Authors: S Sivakumar, Wendy O Sparks, Allen W Miller, Bryony C Bonning

    Abstract:

    Abstract Development of ways to block virus transmission by aphids could lead to novel and broad-spectrum means of controlling plant viruses. Viruses in the Luteoviridae enhanced are obligately transmitted by aphids in a persistent manner that requires virion accumulation in the aphid hemocoel. To enter the hemocoel, the virion must bind and traverse the aphid gut epithelium. By screening a phage display library, we identified a 12-residue gut binding peptide (GBP3.1) that binds to the midgut and hindgut of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum . Binding was confirmed by labeling the aphid gut with a GBP3.1–green fluorescent protein fusion. GBP3.1 reduced uptake of Pea enation mosaic virus (Luteoviridae) from the pea aphid gut into the hemocoel. GBP3.1 also bound to the gut epithelia of the green peach aphid and the soybean aphid. These results suggest a novel strategy for inhibiting plant virus transmission by at least three major aphid pest species.

    Free Register to Access Article