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Myriam Bormans – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • rise and fall of toxic benthic freshwater cyanobacteria Anabaena spp in the eel river buoyancy and dispersal
    Harmful Algae, 2017
    Co-Authors: Keith Boumagregson, Myriam Bormans, Mary E Power
    Abstract:

    Benthic cyanobacteria in rivers produce cyanotoxins and affect aquatic food webs, but knowledge of their ecology lags behind planktonic cyanobacteria. The buoyancy of benthic Anabaena spp. mats was studied to understand implications for Anabaena dispersal in the Eel River, California. Field experiments were used to investigate the effects of oxygen bubble production and dissolution on the buoyancy of Anabaena dominated benthic mats in response to light exposure. Samples of Anabaena dominated mats were harvested from the South Fork Eel River and placed in settling columns to measure floating and sinking velocities, or deployed into in situ ambient and low light treatments to measure the effect of light on flotation. Floating and sinking occurred within minutes and were driven by oxygen bubbles produced during photosynthesis, rather than intracellular changes in carbohydrates or gas vesicles. Light experiment results showed that in a natural ambient light regime, mats remained floating for at least 4days, while in low light mats begin to sink in <24h. Floating Anabaena samples were collected from five sites in the watershed and found to contain the cyanotoxins anatoxin-a and microcystin, with higher concentrations of anatoxin-a (median 560, max 30,693ng/gDW) than microcystin (median 30, max 37ng/gDW). The ability of Anabaena mats to maintain their buoyancy will markedly increase their downstream dispersal distances. Increased buoyancy also allows toxin-containing mats to collect along shorelines, increasing threats to human and animal public health.

  • Rise and fall of toxic benthic freshwater cyanobacteria (Anabaena spp.) in the Eel river: Buoyancy and dispersal
    Harmful Algae, 2017
    Co-Authors: Keith Bouma-gregson, Mary E Power, Myriam Bormans
    Abstract:

    Benthic cyanobacteria in rivers produce cyanotoxins and affect aquatic food webs, but knowledge of their ecology lags behind planktonic cyanobacteria. The buoyancy of benthic Anabaena spp. mats was studied to understand implications for Anabaena dispersal in the Eel River, California. Field experiments were used to investigate the effects of oxygen bubble production and dissolution on the buoyancy of Anabaena dominated benthic mats in response to light exposure. Samples of Anabaena dominated mats were harvested from the South Fork Eel River and placed in settling columns to measure floating and sinking velocities, or deployed into in situ ambient and low light treatments to measure the effect of light on flotation. Floating and sinking occurred within minutes and were driven by oxygen bubbles produced during photosynthesis, rather than intracellular changes in carbohydrates or gas vesicles. Light experiment results showed that in a natural ambient light regime, mats remained floating for at least 4days, while in low light mats begin to sink in

Enrico Schleiff – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The proteome of the heterocyst cell wall in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120
    Biological chemistry, 2007
    Co-Authors: Suncana Moslavac, Enrique Flores, Oliver Mirus, Lutz A. Eichacker, Veronika Reisinger, Matthias Berg, Oliver Vosyka, Matthias Plöscher, Enrico Schleiff
    Abstract:

    Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that serves as a model to analyze prokaryotic cell differentiation, evolutionary development of plastids, and the regulation of nitrogen fixation. The cell wall is the cellular structure in contact with the surrounding medium. To understand the dynamics of the cell wall proteome during cell differentiation, the cell wall from Anabaena heterocysts was enriched and analyzed. In line with the recently proposed continuity of the outer membrane along the Anabaena filament, most of the proteins identified in the heterocyst cell-wall fraction are also present in the cell wall of vegetative cells, even though the lipid content of both membranes is different.

  • Proteomic analysis of the outer membrane of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.
    Journal of proteome research, 2005
    Co-Authors: Suncana Moslavac, Rolf Bredemeier, Oliver Mirus, Bernhard Granvogl, Lutz A. Eichacker, Enrico Schleiff
    Abstract:

    Anabaena is a model to analyze the evolutionary development of plastids, cell differentiation, and the regulation of nitrogen fixation. Thereby, the outer membrane proteome is the place of sensing environmental differences and during plastid development, systems for intracellular communication had to be added to the proteome of this membrane. We present a protocol for the isolation of the outer membrane from Anabaena and the analysis of the proteome using different tools. 55 Proteins were identified. Keywords: proteome analysis • β-barrel analysis • Anabaena • outer membrane

L C Rai – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comparative proteomics unveils cross species variations in Anabaena under salt stress
    Journal of Proteomics, 2014
    Co-Authors: Snigdha Rai, Alok Kumar Shrivastava, Prashant Kumar Singh, Chhavi Agrawal, L C Rai
    Abstract:

    Abstract The present study compares protein diversity within three Anabaena species (Anabaena doliolum, Anabaena sp.PCC 7120 and Anabaena L31). 2-DE based analysis of 256 protein spots in control and 1, 3, 5, and 7 days of salt treatment resulted into 96 proteins arching across fourteen functional categories were assigned to biochemical pathways using KOBAS 2.0. While 52.34% of the evaluated protein spots were common across three species, the remaining 47.66% fraction mainly comprised of the hypothetical and unknown proteins. PSORTb, CDD, Motifscan and Pfam revealed function and subcellular localization for 27 of the 31 hypothetical and unknown proteins. The differences in high salt tolerance (LC50) of A. doliolum over A. L31 was reflected by (i) many fold accumulation (as spot volumes) of Alr3090, Alr0803, peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase and modulator of DNA gyrase proteins, and (ii) a better photosynthesis and energy homeostasis as indicated through photosystem activity, respiration, ATP and NADPH contents. Some common noteworthy salt effects include (i) photosystem damage, (ii) DNA damage repair, (iii) upregulated protein synthesis, (iv) enhanced sulphur metabolism, and (v) upregulated pentose phosphosphatehway. 34 of the identified protein spots are novel entries to the Anabaena salt proteome. This study reveals the existence of separate strategies even within species to combat stress. Biological significance This study for the first time enumerates protein diversity in three Anabaena species employing their presence/absence and relative abundance. Proteomics integrated with physiology and bioinformatics deciphers differential salt tolerance among the studied species and is the first of its kind to predict the function of hypothetical and unknown proteins. Salt-induced proteomic alterations clearly demonstrate significant metabolic shifts and existence of separate molecular phenome among the species investigated. This may be responsible for niche specificity limiting their application as biofertilizer. Of the 96 identified proteins, a large chunk are new entries to the Anabaena salt proteome while some protein genes may be used as potential candidates for engineering salt tolerant cyanobacteria.

  • comparative proteomics reveals association of early accumulated proteins in conferring butachlor tolerance in three n2 fixing Anabaena spp
    Journal of Proteomics, 2014
    Co-Authors: Chhavi Agrawal, Shilpi Singh, Prashant Kumar Singh, Sonia Sen, Snigdha Rai, Vinay Kumar Singh, L C Rai
    Abstract:

    Abstract Butachlor an extensively used rice field herbicide negatively affects the cyanobacterial proliferation, yet the molecular mechanism underlying its toxicity in diazotrophic cyanobacteria is largely unknown. The present study focuses on the comparative proteomics to decode the molecular basis of butachlor toxicity/tolerance in three Anabaena species e.g. Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Anabaena doliolum and Anabaena L31. 75 differentially expressed proteins from each Anabaena sp. included those involved in photosynthesis, C, N and protein metabolism, redox homeostasis, and signal transduction. While early accumulated proteins related to photosynthesis (atpA, atpB), carbon metabolism (glpx, fba and prk), protein folding (groEL, PPIase), regulation (orrA) and other function (OR, akr) appeared crucial for tolerance of Anabaena L31, the late accumulated proteins in Anabaena 7120 presumably offer acclimation during prolonged exposure to butachlor. Contrary to the above, a multitude of down-accumulated proteins vis-a-vis metabolisms augment sensitivity of A. doliolum to butachlor. A cluster of high abundant proteins (atpA, groEL, OR, AGTase, Alr0803, Alr0806, Alr3090, Alr3199, All4050 and All4051) common across the three species may be taken as markers for butachlor tolerance and deserve exploitation for stress management and transgenic development. Biological significance Cyanobacteria offer an eco-friendly alternative to chemical fertilizers for increasing productivity, especially in rice cultivation. This study is the first to compare the proteome of three diazotrophic cyanobacteria subjected to butachlor, a pre-emergent herbicide extensively used in rice paddy. Changes in protein dynamics over time along with physiological and biochemical attributes clearly provide a comprehensive overview on differential tolerance of Anabaena species to butachlor. Molecular docking further added a new dimension in identification of potential protein candidates for butachlor stress management in cyanobacteria. This study strongly recommends combined application of Anabaena spp. A. L31 and A. PCC7120 as biofertilizer in paddy fields undergoing butachlor treatment.

Muriel Gugger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • anatoxin a synthetase gene cluster of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp strain 37 and molecular methods to detect potential producers
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Anne Rantalaylinen, Muriel Gugger, Leo Rouhiainen, Suvi Kana, Hao Wang, Matti Wahlsten, Ermanno Rizzi, Katri A Berg
    Abstract:

    Cyanobacterial mass occurrences are common in fresh and brackish waters. They pose a threat to water users due to toxins frequently produced by the cyanobacterial species present. Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a are neurotoxins synthesized by various cyanobacteria, e.g., Anabaena, Oscillatoria, and Aphanizomenon. The biosynthesis of these toxins and the genes involved in anatoxin production were recently described for Oscillatoria sp. strain PCC 6506 (A. Mejean et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131:7512-7513, 2009). In this study, we identified the anatoxin synthetase gene cluster (anaA to anaG and orf1; 29 kb) in Anabaena sp. strain 37. The gene (81.6% to 89.2%) and amino acid (78.8% to 86.9%) sequences were highly similar to those of Oscillatoria sp. PCC 6506, while the organization of the genes differed. Molecular detection methods for potential anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a producers of the genera Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Oscillatoria were developed by designing primers to recognize the anaC gene. Anabaena and Oscillatoria anaC genes were specifically identified in several cyanobacterial strains by PCR. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the anaC amplicons enabled simultaneous identification of three producer genera: Anabaena, Oscillatoria, and Aphanizomenon. The molecular methods developed in this study revealed the presence of both Anabaena and Oscillatoria as potential anatoxin producers in Finnish fresh waters and the Baltic Sea; they could be applied for surveys of these neurotoxin producers in other aquatic environments.

  • Phylogenetic comparison of the cyanobacterial genera Anabaena and Aphanizomenon.
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Muriel Gugger, Christina Lyra, Peter Henriksen, Alain Couté, Jean-françois Humbert, Kaarina Sivonen
    Abstract:

    Morphological analysis and sequencing of the 165 rRNA gene, the spacer region of the ribosomal operon (ITS1) and the rbcLX (RubisCO) region was performed on 26 Anabaena strains and 14 Aphanizomenon strains isolated from several lakes in Denmark, Finland and France. Based on their morphology, Anabaena strains differed from strains of Aphanizomenon: the vegetative cells, heterocysts and akinetes were significantly wider in Anabaena than in Aphanizomenon. Phylogenetic trees based on the 16S rDNA, ITS1 and rbcLX regions showed that the planktic Anabaena strains were not distinguishable from Aphanizomenon strains. The results of the clustering of Anabaena and Aphanizomenon strains based on 16S rDNA sequences showed that these two genera are not monophyletic. Sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA, ITS1-S and rbcLX regions of the planktic Anabaena strains showed that this genus is heterogeneous. In all methods, Anabaena strains that produced different toxic compounds (e.g. anatoxin-a, microcystin and an unknown neurotoxin) were clustered separately from each other but were grouped either with non-toxic Anabaena and/or Aphanizomenon strains. Our data suggest that the planktic Anabaena and Aphanizomenon isolates belong to the same genus, regardless of their morphological differences. Thus, a taxonomic revision of the two genera is required.

  • molecular characterization of planktic cyanobacteria of Anabaena aphanizomenon microcystis and planktothrix genera
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 2001
    Co-Authors: Christina Lyra, Sini Suomalainen, Muriel Gugger, Chantal Vezie, Paivi Sundman, Lars Paulin, Kaarina Sivonen
    Abstract:

    Toxic and non-toxic cyanobacterial strains from Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Calothrix, Cylindrospermum, Nostoc, Microcystis, Planktothrix (Oscillatoria agardhii), Oscillatoria and Synechococcus genera were examined by RFLP of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. With both methods, high 16S rRNA gene similarity was found among planktic, anatoxin-a-producing Anabaena and non-toxic Aphanizomenon, microcystin-producing and non-toxic Microcystis, and microcystin-producing and non-toxic Planktothrix strains of different geographical origins. The respective sequence similarities were 99.9-100%, 94.2-99.9% and 99.3-100%. Thus the morphological characteristics (e.g. Anabaena and Aphanizomenon), the physiological (toxicity) characteristics or the geographical origins did not reflect the level of 16S rRNA gene relatedness of the closely related strains studied. In addition, cyanobacterial strains were fingerprinted with repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)- and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR. All the strains except two identical pairs of Microcystis strains had different band profiles. The overall grouping of the trees from the 16S rRNA gene and the REP- and ERIC-PCR analyses was similar. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, four major clades were formed. (i) The clade containing filamentous heterocystous cyanobacteria was divided into three discrete groups of Anabaena/Aphanizomenon, Anabaena/Cylindrospermum/ Nodularia/Nostoc and Calothrix strains. The three other clades contained (ii) filamentous non-heterocystous Planktothrix, (iii) unicellular non-heterocystous Microcystis and (iv) Synechococcus strains.

Suncana Moslavac – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Outer membrane proteins of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120
    , 2007
    Co-Authors: Suncana Moslavac
    Abstract:

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (further referred to as Anabaena sp.) is a model system to study nitrogen fixation, cell differentiation, cell pattern formation and evolution of plastids. It is a multicellular photosynthetic microorganism consisting of two cell types, vegetative cells and nitrogen fixing heterocysts. This study focuses on the function and dynamics of the proteome of the Gram-negative outer membrane in Anabaena sp. with emphasis on cell differentiation and iron limitation. The newly developed methods for the membrane fractionation are presented, followed by analysis and comparison of the outer membrane proteomes of vegetative cells and heterocysts. The absence of major proteomic alterations in the outer membrane between two cell types, together with the presented data on GFP activity in mutant strains, experimentally support the previously proposed continuum of the outer membrane and the periplasm in Anabaena sp. filament. Also, somewhat different properties of the Anabaena sp. periplasm than in unicellular cyanobacteria are suggested. Furthermore, two common classes of the outer membrane -barrel proteins are analyzed closer. First, Alr2887 protein, as shown here, is a TolC homologue present in both cell types. Protein secretion through Alr2887 / TolC channel-tunnel is essential for the heterocysts maturation and the glycolipid layer formation. Furthermore, the inner membrane ABC transporter encoded by devBCA operon is proposed as component of the TolC efflux system in Anabaena sp. heterocysts. Second, phylogenetic analysis of the surprisingly abundant protein family of 24 TonB-dependent iron transporters in Anabaena sp. is presented. Five members of this family are detected in the outer membrane of vegetative cells under iron-repletion and two of them, All4026 and Alr0397, are explored closer. It is demonstrated that the function of these iron transporters is required for maintaining iron homeostasis of the filaments under iron-replete conditions. Consequently, their gene expression is constant and not enhanced by iron limitation. All4026 and Alr0397 have different specificity for siderophore substrates and in addition to iron transport, All4026 protein is capable of copper uptake and influence on copper homeostasis in Anabaena sp. as well.

  • The proteome of the heterocyst cell wall in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120
    Biological chemistry, 2007
    Co-Authors: Suncana Moslavac, Enrique Flores, Oliver Mirus, Lutz A. Eichacker, Veronika Reisinger, Matthias Berg, Oliver Vosyka, Matthias Plöscher, Enrico Schleiff
    Abstract:

    Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that serves as a model to analyze prokaryotic cell differentiation, evolutionary development of plastids, and the regulation of nitrogen fixation. The cell wall is the cellular structure in contact with the surrounding medium. To understand the dynamics of the cell wall proteome during cell differentiation, the cell wall from Anabaena heterocysts was enriched and analyzed. In line with the recently proposed continuity of the outer membrane along the Anabaena filament, most of the proteins identified in the heterocyst cell-wall fraction are also present in the cell wall of vegetative cells, even though the lipid content of both membranes is different.

  • Proteomic analysis of the outer membrane of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.
    Journal of proteome research, 2005
    Co-Authors: Suncana Moslavac, Rolf Bredemeier, Oliver Mirus, Bernhard Granvogl, Lutz A. Eichacker, Enrico Schleiff
    Abstract:

    Anabaena is a model to analyze the evolutionary development of plastids, cell differentiation, and the regulation of nitrogen fixation. Thereby, the outer membrane proteome is the place of sensing environmental differences and during plastid development, systems for intracellular communication had to be added to the proteome of this membrane. We present a protocol for the isolation of the outer membrane from Anabaena and the analysis of the proteome using different tools. 55 Proteins were identified. Keywords: proteome analysis • β-barrel analysis • Anabaena • outer membrane