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Anaerobic Digestion

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Yebo Li – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Challenges and strategies for solid-state Anaerobic Digestion of lignocellulosic biomass
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2015
    Co-Authors: Liangcheng Yang, Fuqing Xu, Xumeng Ge, Yebo Li

    Abstract:

    Solid-state Anaerobic Digestion (SS-AD) has gained increasing attention in recent years, especially for digesting lignocellulosic biomass. Compared to liquid Anaerobic Digestion (L-AD), SS-AD handles feedstocks with higher total solids content, and therefore, performs more effectively at higher organic loading rates and has higher volumetric biogas productivity. Challenges facing SS-AD of lignocellulosic biomass are primarily related to its relatively low methane yield, potential instability, and low value end-products. These challenges are either due to the inherent limits of SS-AD (e.g. retarded mass transfer caused by high solid content) or can be attributed to the nature of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g. components recalcitrant to biodegradation). To address these challenges, a variety of methods, including pretreatment of feedstock, improvement of inoculation efficiency, co-Digestion of multiple feedstocks, and upgrading biogas to higher-value transportation fuels, have been examined to enhance the performance of SS-AD and increase the value of the end products. This review summarizes these challenges in SS-AD of lignocellulosic biomass and discusses the mechanisms and feasibility of potential strategies for resolving them.

  • effects of microbial and non microbial factors of liquid Anaerobic Digestion effluent as inoculum on solid state Anaerobic Digestion of corn stover
    Bioresource Technology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Fuqing Xu, Zhongtang Yu, Zhongjiang Wang, Jill A Stiverson, Yebo Li

    Abstract:

    The microbial activity of the inoculum (liquid Anaerobic Digestion effluent) was altered by autoclaving part of the effluent to study the effect of feedstock to active effluent ratio (F/Ea, 2.2–6.6) and the feedstock to total effluent ratio (F/Et, 2.2 and 4.4) on reactor performance in solid state Anaerobic Digestion (SS-AD) of corn stover. When the F/Ea ratio was increased from 2.2 to 6.6, methane yield was not significantly reduced; however, reactors became acidified when the F/Et ratio was increased from 2.2 to 4.4. It was concluded that F/Et had a greater effect on methane yields than F/Ea for the range studied in this paper. As analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community underwent dynamic shifts under acidified conditions over 38 days of SS-AD. These shifts reflected the acclimation, both adaptive selection and diversification, of the initial inoculated microbial consortia.

  • comparison of different liquid Anaerobic Digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid state batch Anaerobic Digestion of corn stover
    Waste Management, 2013
    Co-Authors: Fuqing Xu, Wen Lv, Zhongtang Yu, Yebo Li

    Abstract:

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. – Abstract: Effluents from three liquid Anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch Anaerobic Digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairymore » waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch Anaerobic Digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid Anaerobic Digestion effluents.« less

Fuqing Xu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Challenges and strategies for solid-state Anaerobic Digestion of lignocellulosic biomass
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2015
    Co-Authors: Liangcheng Yang, Fuqing Xu, Xumeng Ge, Yebo Li

    Abstract:

    Solid-state Anaerobic Digestion (SS-AD) has gained increasing attention in recent years, especially for digesting lignocellulosic biomass. Compared to liquid Anaerobic Digestion (L-AD), SS-AD handles feedstocks with higher total solids content, and therefore, performs more effectively at higher organic loading rates and has higher volumetric biogas productivity. Challenges facing SS-AD of lignocellulosic biomass are primarily related to its relatively low methane yield, potential instability, and low value end-products. These challenges are either due to the inherent limits of SS-AD (e.g. retarded mass transfer caused by high solid content) or can be attributed to the nature of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g. components recalcitrant to biodegradation). To address these challenges, a variety of methods, including pretreatment of feedstock, improvement of inoculation efficiency, co-Digestion of multiple feedstocks, and upgrading biogas to higher-value transportation fuels, have been examined to enhance the performance of SS-AD and increase the value of the end products. This review summarizes these challenges in SS-AD of lignocellulosic biomass and discusses the mechanisms and feasibility of potential strategies for resolving them.

  • effects of microbial and non microbial factors of liquid Anaerobic Digestion effluent as inoculum on solid state Anaerobic Digestion of corn stover
    Bioresource Technology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Fuqing Xu, Zhongtang Yu, Zhongjiang Wang, Jill A Stiverson, Yebo Li

    Abstract:

    The microbial activity of the inoculum (liquid Anaerobic Digestion effluent) was altered by autoclaving part of the effluent to study the effect of feedstock to active effluent ratio (F/Ea, 2.2–6.6) and the feedstock to total effluent ratio (F/Et, 2.2 and 4.4) on reactor performance in solid state Anaerobic Digestion (SS-AD) of corn stover. When the F/Ea ratio was increased from 2.2 to 6.6, methane yield was not significantly reduced; however, reactors became acidified when the F/Et ratio was increased from 2.2 to 4.4. It was concluded that F/Et had a greater effect on methane yields than F/Ea for the range studied in this paper. As analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community underwent dynamic shifts under acidified conditions over 38 days of SS-AD. These shifts reflected the acclimation, both adaptive selection and diversification, of the initial inoculated microbial consortia.

  • comparison of different liquid Anaerobic Digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid state batch Anaerobic Digestion of corn stover
    Waste Management, 2013
    Co-Authors: Fuqing Xu, Wen Lv, Zhongtang Yu, Yebo Li

    Abstract:

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. – Abstract: Effluents from three liquid Anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch Anaerobic Digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairymore » waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch Anaerobic Digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid Anaerobic Digestion effluents.« less

David P. Chynoweth – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • renewable methane from Anaerobic Digestion of biomass
    Renewable Energy, 2001
    Co-Authors: David P. Chynoweth, John M. Owens, Robe Legrand

    Abstract:

    Production of methane via Anaerobic Digestion of energy crops and organic wastes would benefit society by providing a clean fuel from renewable feedstocks. This would replace fossil fuel-derived energy and reduce environmental impacts including global warming and acid rain. Although biomass energy is more costly than fossil fuel-derived energy, trends to limit carbon dioxide and other emissions through emission regulations, carbon taxes, and subsidies of biomass energy would make it cost competitive. Methane derived from Anaerobic Digestion is competitive in efficiencies and costs to other biomass energy forms including heat, synthesis gases, and ethanol.

  • Renewable methane from Anaerobic Digestion of biomass
    Renewable Energy, 2000
    Co-Authors: David P. Chynoweth, John M. Owens, Robert Legrand

    Abstract:

    Production of methane via Anaerobic Digestion of energy crops and organic wastes would benefit society by providing a clean fuel from renewable feedstocks. This would replace fossil fuel-derived energy and reduce environmental impacts including global warming and acid rain. Although biomass energy is more costly than fossil fuel-derived energy, trends to limit carbon dioxide and other emissions through emission regulations, carbon taxes, and subsidies of biomass energy would make it cost competitive. Methane derived from Anaerobic Digestion is competitive in efficiencies and costs to other biomass energy forms including heat, synthesis gases, and ethanol. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.