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Anagen Effluvium

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Hyungok Kim – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • normal Anagen Effluvium as the presenting sign of pemphigus vulgaris a case report
    Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Youjeong Kim, Miyeon Kim, Young Min Park, Hyungok Kim

    Abstract:

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. It is characterized, histologically, by intraepidermal blisters, and immunopathologically, by the bound and circulating IgG directed to the epithelial desmosomes. In the majority of patients, painful mucous membrane erosions, especially in the oral cavity, are the presenting sign. The hair follicle is also a preferential target for pemphigus autoantibodies as the desmosomal proteins are overexpressed in follicular epithelium. We herein report a case of pemphigus vulgaris presenting with normal Anagen Effluvium.

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  • Normal Anagen Effluvium as the presenting sign of pemphigus vulgaris: a case report1
    Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Miyeon Kim, Youjeong Kim, Young Min Park, Hyungok Kim

    Abstract:

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering diseases of skin and mucous membranes characterized histologically by intraepidermal blisters and immunopathologically by the bound and circulating IgG directed to Dsg3 and, in part, Dsg1 of the epithelial desmosomes. In majority of patients, painful mucous membrane erosions, especially in oral cavity, are the presenting sign, and scalp involvement as a initial presentation is reported to occupy 3-6% in pemphigus vulgaris. Hair follicle is one of the preferential targets for pemphigus autoantibodies as the desmosomal proteins are overexpressed in follicular epithelium. Those proteins are especially distributed throughout the outer root sheath of the whole hair follicle and in the dermal bulb matrix cell and take charge of attachment of hair. A 47-year-old Korean man presented with crusted non-scarring alopecic patches on the scalp for 1 month and small blisters on the trunk and upper extremities for 1 week. Hairs were easily plucked from perilesional area and plucked hairs looked like normal Anagen hairs with intact root sheaths. Histopathologic examination revealed acantholysis of basal layer in epidermis by the manner of “row of tombstones” and clefts in outer root sheathes of hair follicles. Direct immunifluorescence test, indirect immunofluorescence test and immunoblotting test were consistent with pemphigus vulgaris. This case shows normal Anagen Effluvium as well as painful oral mucous membrane erosions can be a presenting signs of pemphigus vulgaris.

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Antonella Tosti – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Alterazioni dei capelli da farmaci
    Tricologia ambulatoriale, 2014
    Co-Authors: Antonella Tosti, Bianca Maria Piraccini

    Abstract:

    La maggior parte delle alopecie da farmaci si presenta con un telogen Effluvium, che spesso non provoca un’alopecia evidente ed e reversibile. I chemioterapici antitumorali causano sia un telogen Effluvium che un Anagen Effluvium con un’alopecia acuta e grave, ma generalmente completamente reversibile. Alcuni chemioterapici possono pero provocare un’alopecia permanente.

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  • Permanent alopecia after systemic chemotherapy: a clinicopathological study of 10 cases
    The American Journal of Dermatopathology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Mariya Miteva, Cosimo Misciali, Pier Alessandro Fanti, Colombina Vincenzi, Paolo Romanelli, Antonella Tosti

    Abstract:

    Anagen Effluvium due to chemotherapy is usually reversible with complete hair regrowth. However, there is increased evidence that certain chemotherapy regimens can cause dose-dependent permanent alopecia. The histological features of this type of alopecia and the mechanisms of its origin are not known yet. We discuss the histological features of 10 cases of permanent alopecia after systematic chemotherapy with taxanes (docetaxel) for breast cancer (6 patients), busulfan for acute myelogenous leukemia (3 patients), and cisplatin and etoposide for lung cancer (1 patient). All patients had moderate to very severe hair thinning, which in 4 cases was more accentuated on androgen-dependent scalp regions. Patients complained that scalp hair did not grow longer than 10 cm and showed altered texture. Paired scalp biopsies from the affected scalp areas were obtained and evaluated in serial horizontal and vertical sections. The histology of all specimens was characterized by a nonscarring pattern with a preserved number of follicular units and lack of fibrosis. The hair count revealed decreased number of terminal hairs, increased telogen hairs, and increased miniaturized vellus-like hairs with a terminal to vellus and Anagen to telogen ratios of 1:1 and 3.6:1, respectively. There was increased number of fibrous streamers (stelae) in both reticular dermis and subcutis. Arao-Perkins bodies were found in the subcutaneous portions of the streamers. The histological findings of permanent alopecia after chemotherapy are those of a nonscarring alopecia similar to androgenetic alopecia. Dermatopathologists should be aware of this condition as the absence of fibrosis and the presence of miniaturized hairs may be considered as features consistent with a diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia. Hence, these cases could easily be misdiagnosed in the absence of a good clinicopathological correlation.

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  • Drug Reactions Affecting Hair: Diagnosis
    Dermatologic Clinics, 2007
    Co-Authors: Antonella Tosti, Massimiliano Pazzaglia

    Abstract:

    Drugs may cause hair loss, stimulate hair growth, or induce changes in the hair shape and color. Drug-induced hair loss is, in most cases, a consequence of a toxic effect of the drug on the hair matrix. Although a large number of drugs have been occasionally reported to produce hair loss, the relationship between drug intake and hair loss has been proven only for a few agents. Type of hair loss (telogen Effluvium, Anagen Effluvium, or both) depends on the drug, its dosage, and patient’s susceptibility. Drug-induced hair loss is usually reversible.

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Miyeon Kim – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • normal Anagen Effluvium as the presenting sign of pemphigus vulgaris a case report
    Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Youjeong Kim, Miyeon Kim, Young Min Park, Hyungok Kim

    Abstract:

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. It is characterized, histologically, by intraepidermal blisters, and immunopathologically, by the bound and circulating IgG directed to the epithelial desmosomes. In the majority of patients, painful mucous membrane erosions, especially in the oral cavity, are the presenting sign. The hair follicle is also a preferential target for pemphigus autoantibodies as the desmosomal proteins are overexpressed in follicular epithelium. We herein report a case of pemphigus vulgaris presenting with normal Anagen Effluvium.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Normal Anagen Effluvium as the presenting sign of pemphigus vulgaris: a case report1
    Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Miyeon Kim, Youjeong Kim, Young Min Park, Hyungok Kim

    Abstract:

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering diseases of skin and mucous membranes characterized histologically by intraepidermal blisters and immunopathologically by the bound and circulating IgG directed to Dsg3 and, in part, Dsg1 of the epithelial desmosomes. In majority of patients, painful mucous membrane erosions, especially in oral cavity, are the presenting sign, and scalp involvement as a initial presentation is reported to occupy 3-6% in pemphigus vulgaris. Hair follicle is one of the preferential targets for pemphigus autoantibodies as the desmosomal proteins are overexpressed in follicular epithelium. Those proteins are especially distributed throughout the outer root sheath of the whole hair follicle and in the dermal bulb matrix cell and take charge of attachment of hair. A 47-year-old Korean man presented with crusted non-scarring alopecic patches on the scalp for 1 month and small blisters on the trunk and upper extremities for 1 week. Hairs were easily plucked from perilesional area and plucked hairs looked like normal Anagen hairs with intact root sheaths. Histopathologic examination revealed acantholysis of basal layer in epidermis by the manner of “row of tombstones” and clefts in outer root sheathes of hair follicles. Direct immunifluorescence test, indirect immunofluorescence test and immunoblotting test were consistent with pemphigus vulgaris. This case shows normal Anagen Effluvium as well as painful oral mucous membrane erosions can be a presenting signs of pemphigus vulgaris.

    Free Register to Access Article