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Svante Strandberg – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Rec. av Thorsten Andersson: Vad och vade. Svensk slåtter-, rågångs- och arealterminologi (2010)
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Svante Strandberg

    Abstract:

    Rec. av Thorsten Andersson: Vad och vade. Svensk slatter-, ragangs- och arealterminologi (2010)

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  • Recension av Thorsten Andersson: Vad och vade. Svensk slåtter-, rågångs- och arealterminologi (2010)
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Svante Strandberg

    Abstract:

    Recension av Thorsten Andersson: Vad och vade. Svensk slatter-, ragangs- och arealterminologi (2010)

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T.-h. Kim – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Andersson lesions of whole spine magnetic resonance imaging compared with plain radiography in ankylosing spondylitis.
    Rheumatology international, 2016
    Co-Authors: Seong-kyu Kim, S. Lee, Kichul Shin, Yoonah Song, T.-h. Kim

    Abstract:

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of Andersson lesions using whole spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with plain radiography in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 62 patients with AS who had undergone whole spine MRI and plain radiography were retrospectively enrolled in this study. We compared the number of discovertebral units (DVUs) with Andersson lesions with clinical and radiographic indices such as erythrocyte sediment rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Fifty-three patients (85.5 %) by whole spine MRI and 23 patients (37.1 %) by plain radiography had at least one Andersson lesion. We found 129 DVUs with Andersson lesions (11.1 %) by MRI and 35 DVUs by plain radiography over all the spine levels. Andersson lesions by MRI were most commonly detected at the lower thoracic spine (from T7-8 to T12-L1). Among the 151 total Andersson lesions by whole spine MRI, 41 were identified as central disc type, 26 as anterior peripheral disc type, 44 as posterior peripheral disc type, and 40 as diffuse disc type. However, the number of Andersson lesions did not correlate with ESR, CRP, BASDAI, BASFI, or mSASSS (p > 0.05 for all). Our study indicates that the presence of Andersson lesions in patients with AS is clearly underestimated. MRI is a superior technique for detecting early Andersson lesions compared with plain radiography.

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  • AB0720 The Characteristics of Andersson Lesions (Spondylodiscitis) Based on Whole Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Ankylosing Spondylitis
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2016
    Co-Authors: Soon-dong Kim, Kyusoon Shin, Yun-kyoung Song, S. Lee, T.-h. Kim

    Abstract:

    Background Andresson lesions could cause debilitating pain and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Objectives The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of Andersson lesions using whole spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in AS. Methods A total of 62 patients with AS who had taken whole spine MRI were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Regional distribution in the entire spine and within the individual discovertebral unit (DVU) including the central, peripheral, and diffuse disc types of Andersson lesion was assessed. We compared the number of DVUs with Andersson lesion with clinical and radiographic indicies such as erythrocyte sediment rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), BASDAI, BASFI, and modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Results Fifty-three patients (85.5%) had at least one Andersson lesion. We found a total of 129 DVUs with Andesson lesions (9.0%) in the entire spine levels. Andersson lesion at the lower thoracic spine (from T7–8 to T12-L1) was most commonly detected than other spine levels. Among the total 151 Andersson lesions, 41 lesions were identified at the central, 26 lesions at the anterior peripheral, 44 lesions at the posterior peripheral, and 40 lesions at the diffuse disc types. However, the number of Andersson lesions did not correlate with ESR, CRP, BASDAI, BASFI, and mSASSS in AS patients (p>0.05 of all). Conclusions Our study indicates that presence of Andersson lesion in AS patients is clearly underestimated. MRI provides more increased opportunity to detect earlier Andersson lesions than conventional radiography. References Park YS, Kim JH, Ryu JA, Kim TH. The Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis: distinguishing between the inflammatory and traumatic subtypes. J Bone Joint Surg Br 2011;93:961–6. de Vries MK, van Drumpt AS, van Royen BJ, van Denderen JC, Manoliu RA, van der Horst-Bruinsma IE. Discovertebral (Andersson) lesions in severe ankylosing spondylitis: a study using MRI and conventional radiography. Clin Rheumatol 2010;29:1433–8. Kabasakal Y, Garrett SL, Calin A. The epidemiology of spondylodiscitis in ankylosing spondylitis – a controlled study. Br J Rheumatol 1996;35:660–3. Disclosure of Interest None declared

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Craig J. Richardson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • How much did the expropriation of commercial farms matter to food insecurity in Zimbabwe?Rebuttal to Andersson
    African Affairs, 2007
    Co-Authors: Craig J. Richardson

    Abstract:

    The root causes of Zimbabwes economic and food crisis continue to garner debate as demonstrated by Anderssons critique of my recent African Affairs article. Andersson argues that the origins of Zimbabwes food crisis come from long-term trends in the communal sector since this sector provides the majority of maize – the countrys staple crop – to the country. He disputes that the food crisis has much if anything to do with misguided government policies and land reforms; this he claims is a popular yet problematic explanation.2 In particular Andersson argues that food production has slowly declined over the past 30 years for two main reasons that I do not discuss: (1) communal farmers have increasingly moved to marginal lands that are subject to lower and more erratic rainfall; and (2) maize production has increasingly been shouldered by communal farmers as commercial farmers moved to other more profitable export crops. His Figure 1 attempts to buttress this claim with lines that show communal farmers production of maize slowly increasing as commercial production decreases over a period of 30 years. His argument is that this is a better explanation for Zimbabwes food insecurity in recent years since the communal sector provides 60 percent of maize production yet is not captured in GDP data. (excerpt)

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  • how much did the expropriation of commercial farms matter to food insecurity in zimbabwe rebuttal to Andersson
    African Affairs, 2007
    Co-Authors: Craig J. Richardson

    Abstract:

    The root causes of Zimbabwes economic and food crisis continue to garner debate as demonstrated by Anderssons critique of my recent African Affairs article. Andersson argues that the origins of Zimbabwes food crisis come from long-term trends in the communal sector since this sector provides the majority of maize – the countrys staple crop – to the country. He disputes that the food crisis has much if anything to do with misguided government policies and land reforms; this he claims is a popular yet problematic explanation.2 In particular Andersson argues that food production has slowly declined over the past 30 years for two main reasons that I do not discuss: (1) communal farmers have increasingly moved to marginal lands that are subject to lower and more erratic rainfall; and (2) maize production has increasingly been shouldered by communal farmers as commercial farmers moved to other more profitable export crops. His Figure 1 attempts to buttress this claim with lines that show communal farmers production of maize slowly increasing as commercial production decreases over a period of 30 years. His argument is that this is a better explanation for Zimbabwes food insecurity in recent years since the communal sector provides 60 percent of maize production yet is not captured in GDP data. (excerpt)

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