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Carlos Graeff-teixeira – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Invasive slug Meghimatium pictum (Stoliczka, 1873) infected by Angiostrongylus costaricensis Morera & Céspedes, 1971, and the possible risk of human infection associated with grape consumption.
    Journal of helminthology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Rubens Rodriguez, Carla Aristonara Müller, Carlos Graeff-teixeira, Sérgio Machado Porto, A.s.s. Sandri, J.b. Osório, Bianca Barbieri Cognato, M.f. Casagrande, Suzete Rodrigues Gomes, Alessandra Loureiro Morassutti

    Abstract:

    Many molluscs may be infected with angiostrongylid larvae. Following the histopathological diagnosis of abdominal angiostrongyliasis in a grape farmer from southern Brazil, molluscs in the area were investigated. During a nocturnal search, 245 specimens of slugs were collected and identified as the invasive Chinese slug Meghimatium pictum. Angiostrongylus costaricensis worms were recovered from mice that were experimentally infected with larvae obtained from 11 (4.5%) of the molluscs. This study presents the first report of M. pictum being identified as an intermediate host for A. costaricensis. Most of the slugs were collected from grape plants, which suggests that transmission may be associated with grape consumption.

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  • Evaluating host-parasite co-adaptation relationships involving Angiostrongylus costaricensis.
    Journal of helminthology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Cinara Tentardini Garrido, Alessandra Loureiro Morassutti, José Ricardo De Souza Barradas, Carlos Graeff-teixeira

    Abstract:

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a parasite that infects rodents, including the wild cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus and pygmy rice rats Oligoryzomys spp., among others. However, urban Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus have not been identified as important hosts of A. costaricensis . In this study, Swiss mice (SW), Wistar R. norvegicus (RN), wild Oligoryzomys nigripes (ON) and a local strain of M. musculus (RGS) were experimentally infected with A. costaricensis. Survival, elimination of L1 (total sum per group, A 0 ), and the number of adult worms recovered divided by the dose of each L3 inoculum (yield ratio, YR) were examined for each group after a 40-day post-infection period. The survival rates, A 0 and YR values were: 27%, 207,589 and 0.42 for the SW group; 81%, 8691 and 0.01 for the RN group; and 63.6%, 26,560 and 0.16 for the RGS group, respectively, in each case. The survival rate for the ON group was 100% and the A 0 value was 847,050. A YR was not calculated for the ON group since the ON group was maintained up to 565 days post-infection (pi) to examine long-term mortality. At 500 days pi (16 months), 50% of the ON group had died, while one animal (10%) survived 595 days pi (20 months). Taken together, these data indicate that A. costaricensis has undergone a greater degree of adaptation to the wild rodent, O. nigripes, than to R. norvegicus or a local M. musculus strain. In addition, titre curve (A 0 ) modelling of adaptation status proved to be useful in evaluating A. costaricensis –rodent interactions.

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  • Larvae of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (arrow) inside a granuloma in confirmed case (H&E, 100x).
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Rubens Rodriguez, Ana Cristina Aramburú Da Silva, Carla Aristonara Müller, Silvana Lunardini Alves, Carlos Graeff-teixeira, Fernando Fornari

    Abstract:

    Larvae of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (arrow) inside a granuloma in confirmed case (H&E, 100x).

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Antonio Osuna – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effectiveness of intranasal vaccination against Angiostrongylus costaricensis using a serine threonine phosphatase 2 a synthetic peptide and recombinant antigens
    Vaccine, 2010
    Co-Authors: J Solanoparada, L.m. De Pablos Torró, Ana M. Espino, M. Burgos, Gloria Gonzalezgonzalez, M Brazil Dos F Santos, Antonio Osuna

    Abstract:

    Intranasal immunization was assayed in C57BL/6 mice against Angiostrongylus costaricensis using a synthetic and a recombinant peptide belonging to the catalytic region of the serine/threonine phosphatase 2 A (PP2A) of the parasite. Immunization was carried out with the synthetic peptide (SP) polymerized either with itself or with the beta fraction of the cholera toxin (CTB) and then enclosed in nanocapsules of phosphatidyl choline, cholesterol and Quil A (ISCOM). Another group of mice was immunized with recombinant peptide. Immunization consisted of two intranasal inoculations at two-week intervals, and the challenge with L3 larvae was made one month after the last vaccination. The effectiveness of immunization was evaluated 30 days after infection by analysis of the number of parasites in the arteries of the immunized mice, as well as by measuring spleen sizes in the experimental groups. The response induced was determined by identifying the isotypes of IgG as well as the IgE and IgA specific antigen response. The interleukins produced by the splenocyte culture of the different groups were assessed after exposing them to the peptide used in the immunization. From our results, 60%, 80%, and 100% protection against the A. costaricensis challenge was achieved in mice immunized with polymerized synthetic peptide in ISCOM, synthetic peptide polymerized with the CTB in ISCOM and inclusion bodies respectively. Splenomegaly was found to be less evident in the immunized mice than in the controls. A significant increase in IFN gamma and IL-17 levels was observed in the group with 100% protection. The results showed that vaccination through the nasal mucosa may constitute a useful method of immunization and result in a protective immune response against A. costaricensis.

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  • Effectiveness of intranasal vaccination against Angiostrongylus costaricensis using a serine/threonine phosphatase 2 A synthetic peptide and recombinant antigens
    Vaccine, 2010
    Co-Authors: J. Solano-parada, Gloria González-gonzález, L.m. De Pablos Torró, M.f. Brazil Dos Santos, Ana M. Espino, M. Burgos, Antonio Osuna

    Abstract:

    Intranasal immunization was assayed in C57BL/6 mice against Angiostrongylus costaricensis using a synthetic and a recombinant peptide belonging to the catalytic region of the serine/threonine phosphatase 2 A (PP2A) of the parasite. Immunization was carried out with the synthetic peptide (SP) polymerized either with itself or with the beta fraction of the cholera toxin (CTB) and then enclosed in nanocapsules of phosphatidyl choline, cholesterol and Quil A (ISCOM). Another group of mice was immunized with recombinant peptide. Immunization consisted of two intranasal inoculations at two-week intervals, and the challenge with L3 larvae was made one month after the last vaccination. The effectiveness of immunization was evaluated 30 days after infection by analysis of the number of parasites in the arteries of the immunized mice, as well as by measuring spleen sizes in the experimental groups. The response induced was determined by identifying the isotypes of IgG as well as the IgE and IgA specific antigen response. The interleukins produced by the splenocyte culture of the different groups were assessed after exposing them to the peptide used in the immunization. From our results, 60%, 80%, and 100% protection against the A. costaricensis challenge was achieved in mice immunized with polymerized synthetic peptide in ISCOM, synthetic peptide polymerized with the CTB in ISCOM and inclusion bodies respectively. Splenomegaly was found to be less evident in the immunized mice than in the controls. A significant increase in IFN gamma and IL-17 levels was observed in the group with 100% protection. The results showed that vaccination through the nasal mucosa may constitute a useful method of immunization and result in a protective immune response against A. costaricensis.

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Fernando Fornari – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A confirmed case with worms of Angiostrongylus costaricensis inside mensenteric artery (H&E, 200x).
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Rubens Rodriguez, Ana Cristina Aramburú Da Silva, Carla Aristonara Müller, Silvana Lunardini Alves, Carlos Graeff-teixeira, Fernando Fornari

    Abstract:

    A confirmed case with worms of Angiostrongylus costaricensis inside mensenteric artery (H&E, 200x).

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  • Larvae of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (arrow) inside a granuloma in confirmed case (H&E, 100x).
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Rubens Rodriguez, Ana Cristina Aramburú Da Silva, Carla Aristonara Müller, Silvana Lunardini Alves, Carlos Graeff-teixeira, Fernando Fornari

    Abstract:

    Larvae of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (arrow) inside a granuloma in confirmed case (H&E, 100x).

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  • Elimination of Angiostrongylus costaricensis larvae in feces from experimentally infected Swiss mice: circadian rhythm and correlation with survival
    Parasitology Research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Graciele Vivian Azevedo, Rubens Rodriguez, Carlos Graeff-teixeira, Sérgio Machado Porto, Fernando Fornari

    Abstract:

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a nematode which harbors mesentery arteries of rodents. In these animals, a circadian rhythm of elimination of first-stage larvae (L1) and a relation between the amount of L1 in feces and survival are unknown. We assessed fecal elimination of A. costaricensis L1 from experimentally infected Swiss mice and tried to correlate L1 elimination with survival. Thirteen Swiss mice were infected by gavage with ten A. costaricensis L3 larvae obtained from Phyllocaulis slugs. Feces were weighed at 7  a.m . and 7  p.m . starting from the 24th day post-infection until animal death. Feces sediment was examined in microscope for L1 counting. The mice were dead after a period ranging 19–61 days post-infection. Compared to diurnal samples, both feces’ weight (2.3 ± 0.7 vs. 1.8 ± 0.5 g; P  

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