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Animal Feeding

The Experts below are selected from a list of 53553 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Zhimin Qiang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • occurrence and partition of antibiotics in the liquid and solid phases of swine wastewater from concentrated Animal Feeding operations in shandong province china
    Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, 2013
    Co-Authors: Zhimin Qiang

    Abstract:

    Swine wastewater represents an important pollution source of antibiotics in the environment; however, regional data about residual antibiotics in swine wastewater are very limited at present. This study investigated the concentrations of three classes of commonly used veterinary antibiotics, including five sulfonamides (SAs), three tetracyclines (TCs) and one macrolide (tiamulin, TIA), in swine wastewater collected from 21 concentrated Animal Feeding operation (CAFO) sites in Shandong Province, China. Both the liquid and solid (i.e., suspended solids) phases of swine wastewater were analyzed to determine the total concentration of each studied antibiotic. Results indicate that sulfamethazine had the highest median concentration (14.56 μg L−1), followed by oxytetracycline (OTC, 8.05 μg L−1) and chlortetracycline (CTC, 6.01 μg L−1). The maximum detected concentration reached up to 2.02 mg L−1 (OTC) and the highest detection frequency was 95.1% (CTC). The median concentrations and detection frequencies of antibiotics in winter samples were generally higher than those in summer samples (except CTC). The log Kd values were in the range of 1.31–1.96 for SAs, 2.05–2.33 for TCs, and 1.54–1.58 for TIA in swine wastewater. More TCs (14–28%) preferred to partition in the solid phase than SAs (2–10%) and TIA (5–10%), indicating that the suspended solids of swine wastewater may not be ignored.

  • residual veterinary antibiotics in swine manure from concentrated Animal Feeding operations in shandong province china
    Chemosphere, 2011
    Co-Authors: Zhimin Qiang, Meixue Chen

    Abstract:

    Abstract The scientific interest in the occurrence and fate of antibiotics in Animal husbandry has increased during the past decades because of the emergence and development of antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria. This study developed a method for simultaneous detection of five sulfonamides, three tetracyclines and one macrolide in swine manure with stable recoveries (73.0–110.6%) and high sensitivity (limit of quantification

Bruno Biavati – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • probiotics and prebiotics in Animal Feeding for safe food production
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Francesca Gaggia, Paola Mattarelli, Bruno Biavati

    Abstract:

    Recent outbreaks of food-borne diseases highlight the need for reducing bacterial pathogens in foods of Animal origin. Animal enteric pathogens are a direct source for food contamination. The ban of antibiotics as growth promoters (AGPs) has been a challenge for Animal nutrition increasing the need to find alternative methods to control and prevent pathogenic bacterial colonization. The modulation of the gut microbiota with new feed additives, such as probiotics and prebiotics, towards host-protecting functions to support Animal health, is a topical issue in Animal breeding and creates fascinating possibilities. Although the knowledge on the effects of such feed additives has increased, essential information concerning their impact on the host are, to date, incomplete. For the future, the most important target, within probiotic and prebiotic research, is a demonstrated health-promoting benefit supported by knowledge on the mechanistic actions. Genomic-based knowledge on the composition and functions of the gut microbiota, as well as its deviations, will advance the selection of new and specific probiotics. Potential combinations of suitable probiotics and prebiotics may prove to be the next step to reduce the risk of intestinal diseases and remove specific microbial disorders. In this review we discuss the current knowledge on the contribution of the gut microbiota to host well-being. Moreover, we review available information on probiotics and prebiotics and their application in Animal Feeding.

  • Probiotics and prebiotics in Animal Feeding for safe food production
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Francesca Gaggia, Paola Mattarelli, Bruno Biavati

    Abstract:

    Recent outbreaks of food-borne diseases highlight the need for reducing bacterial pathogens in foods of Animal origin. Animal enteric pathogens are a direct source for food contamination. The ban of antibiotics as growth promoters (AGPs) has been a challenge for Animal nutrition increasing the need to find alternative methods to control and prevent pathogenic bacterial colonization. The modulation of the gut microbiota with new feed additives, such as probiotics and prebiotics, towards host-protecting functions to support Animal health, is a topical issue in Animal breeding and creates fascinating possibilities. Although the knowledge on the effects of such feed additives has increased, essential information concerning their impact on the host are, to date, incomplete. For the future, the most important target, within probiotic and prebiotic research, is a demonstrated health-promoting benefit supported by knowledge on the mechanistic actions. Genomic-based knowledge on the composition and functions of the gut microbiota, as well as its deviations, will advance the selection of new and specific probiotics. Potential combinations of suitable probiotics and prebiotics may prove to be the next step to reduce the risk of intestinal diseases and remove specific microbial disorders. In this review we discuss the current knowledge on the contribution of the gut microbiota to host well-being. Moreover, we review available information on probiotics and prebiotics and their application in Animal Feeding. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

Susanna G Von Essen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • updated systematic review associations between proximity to Animal Feeding operations and health of individuals in nearby communities
    Systematic Reviews, 2017
    Co-Authors: Annette M Oconnor, Hannah Wood, Brent W Auvermann, Julian P T Higgins, Shelley Kirychuk, Jan M Sargeant, Julie Glanville, Rungano Stan Dzikamunhenga, Sarah C Totton, Susanna G Von Essen

    Abstract:

    The objective of this review was to update a systematic review of associations between living near an Animal Feeding operation (AFO) and human health. The MEDLINE® and MEDLINE® In-Process, Centre for Agricultural Biosciences Abstracts, and Science Citation Index databases were searched. Reference lists of included articles were hand-searched. Eligible studies reported exposure to an AFO and an individual-level human health outcome. Two reviewers performed study selection and data extraction. The search returned 3702 citations. Sixteen articles consisting of 10 study populations were included in the analysis. The health outcomes were lower and upper respiratory tracts, MRSA, other infectious disease, neurological, psychological, dermatological, otologic, ocular, gastrointestinal, stress and mood, and other non-infectious health outcomes. Most studies were observational and used prevalence measures of outcome. An association between Q fever risk and proximity to goat production was reported. Other associations were unclear. Risk of bias was serious or critical for most exposure-outcome associations. Multiplicity (i.e., a large number of potentially correlated outcomes and exposures assessed on the same study subjects) was common in the evidence base. Few studies reported an association between surrogate clinical outcomes and AFO proximity for respiratory tract-related outcomes. There were no consistent dose-response relationships between surrogate clinical outcome and AFO proximity. A new finding was that Q fever in goats is likely associated with an increased Q fever risk in community members. The review results for the non-respiratory health outcomes were inconclusive because only a small number of studies were available or the between-study results were inconsistent. PROSPERO CRD42014010521

  • the association between proximity to Animal Feeding operations and community health a protocol for updating a systematic review
    Systematic Reviews, 2014
    Co-Authors: Annette M Oconnor, Brent W Auvermann, Julian P T Higgins, Shelley Kirychuk, Jan M Sargeant, Susanna G Von Essen, Julie Glanville, Hannah Wood

    Abstract:

    Background
    Livestock and poultry operations that feed large numbers of Animals are common. Facility capacity varies, but it is not uncommon for facilities to house 1,000 swine with multiple barns at a single site, feedlots to house 50,000 cattle, and poultry houses to house 250,000 hens. There is primary research that suggests livestock facilities that confine Animals indoors for Feeding can represent a health hazard for surrounding communities. In this protocol, we describe a review about the association between proximity to AnimalFeeding operations (AFOs) and the health of individuals in nearby communities. A systematic review of the topic was published by some members of our group in 2010. The purpose of this review is to update that review.

  • the association between proximity to Animal Feeding operations and community health a systematic review
    PLOS ONE, 2010
    Co-Authors: Annette M Oconnor, Steven R Kirkhorn, Brent W Auvermann, Jan M Sargeant, Danelle A Bickettweddle, Alejandro Ramirez, Susanna G Von Essen

    Abstract:

    Background
    A systematic review was conducted for the association between Animal Feeding operations (AFOs) and the health of individuals living near AFOs.

    Methodology/Principal Findings
    The review was restricted to studies reporting respiratory, gastrointestinal and mental health outcomes in individuals living near AFOs in North America, European Union, United Kingdom, and Scandinavia. From June to September 2008 searches were conducted in PUBMED, CAB, Web-of-Science, and Agricola with no restrictions. Hand searching of narrative reviews was also used. Two reviewers independently evaluated the role of chance, confounding, information, selection and analytic bias on the study outcome. Nine relevant studies were identified. The studies were heterogeneous with respect to outcomes and exposures assessed. Few studies reported an association between surrogate clinical outcomes and AFO proximity. A negative association was reported when odor was the measure of exposure to AFOs and self-reported disease, the measure of outcome. There was evidence of an association between self-reported disease and proximity to AFO in individuals annoyed by AFO odor.

    Conclusions/Significance
    There was inconsistent evidence of a weak association between self-reported disease in people with allergies or familial history of allergies. No consistent dose response relationship between exposure and disease was observable.