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Animal Food

The Experts below are selected from a list of 12318 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Zhang Xi – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Design of Active Tag on Animal Food Safety Traceability System
    Journal of Yunnan Agricultural University, 2020
    Co-Authors: Zhang Xi

    Abstract:

    The design for tag is the hardware foundation and one of key techniques in Animal Food safety traceability system.The method of establishing the system based on radio frequency ID(RFID) technology was introduced in this paper.The active tag in Animal Food safety traceability system was designed based on the 2.4 GHz microwave chip.The security of Animal Food safety traceability system would be enhanced by using this active tag.

  • Studies on Animal Food Safety Traceability System Using RFID Technology
    Journal of Yunnan Agricultural University, 2020
    Co-Authors: Zhang Xi

    Abstract:

    The application of radio frequency identification technology in Animal Food safety traceability system is beneficial to achieving the tracing of source Food and the scientific and transparent management.In this article,the RFID technology was introduced and the software and hardware frameworks of Animal Food safety traceability system based on RFID were presented.In addition,the pending problems about using the system in large scale were reviewed.

  • Study on the Key Marking Technique in the Traceability System of Animal Food
    Animal Husbandry and Feed Science, 2020
    Co-Authors: Zhang Xi

    Abstract:

    Aiming at the production process of Animal Food,the design problems of the key marking technique in traceability system of Animal Food were discussed.The test results of the reader and electronic tag showed that the communication distance and signal intensity gradually increased with the multiple decrease of data transfer rate.When data transfer rate was 60 kbps or 10 kbps,better communication effect could be achieved.And the signal could be accurately identified in the range of 50 m.The parameters should be chosen in the actual application according to the reading quantity of tags,the communication distance and disturbance conditions.

Stefan Scheu – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Beech trees fuel soil Animal Food webs via root-derived nitrogen
    Basic and Applied Ecology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Sarah L. Zieger, Andrea Holczinger, Janine Sommer, Michaela Rath, Yakov Kuzyakov, Andrea Polle, Mark Maraun, Stefan Scheu

    Abstract:

    Abstract Root-derived resources are receiving increased attention as basal resources for soil Animal Food webs. They predominantly function as carbon and energy resources for microbial metabolism in the rhizosphere, however, root-derived nitrogen may also be important. We explored both the role of root-derived carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) for the nutrition of soil Animal species. Using 13 C and 15 N pulse labeling we followed in situ the flux of shoot-derived C and N into the soil Animal Food web of young beech ( Fagus sylvatica ) and ash ( Fraxinus excelsior ) trees. For labeling with 13 C, trees were exposed to increased atmospheric concentrations of 13 CO 2 and for labeling with 15 N leaves were immersed in a solution of Ca 15 NO 3 . Twenty days after labeling root-derived N was detected in each of the studied soil Animal species whereas incorporation of root-derived C was only detected in the ash rhizosphere. More root-derived N was incorporated into soil Animals from the beech as compared to the ash rhizosphere, in spite of the higher 15 N signatures in fine roots of ash as compared to beech. The results suggest that soil Animal Food webs not only rely on root C but also on root N with the contribution of root N to soil Animal nutrition varying with tree species. This novel pathway of plant N highlights the importance of root-derived resources for soil Animal Food webs.

  • compartmentalization of the soil Animal Food web as indicated by dual analysis of stable isotope ratios 15n 14n and 13c 12c
    Soil Biology & Biochemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Melanie M Pollierer, Stefan Scheu, Reinhard Langel, Mark Maraun

    Abstract:

    Abstract The soil Animal Food web has become a focus of recent ecological research but trophic relationships still remain enigmatic for many taxa. Analysis of stable isotope ratios of N and C provides a powerful tool for disentangling Food web structure. In this study, Animals, roots, soil and litter material from a temperate deciduous forest were analysed. The combined measurement of δ15N and δ13C provided insights into the compartmentalization of the soil Animal Food web. Leaf litter feeders were separated from Animals relying mainly on recent belowground carbon resources and from Animals feeding on older carbon. The trophic pathway of leaf litter-feeding species appears to be a dead end, presumably because leaf litter feeders (mainly diplopods and oribatid mites) are unavailable to predators due to large size and/or strong sclerotization. Endogeic earthworms that rely on older carbon also appear to exist in predator-free space. The data suggest that the largest trophic compartment constitutes of ectomycorrhizal feeders and their predators. Additionally, there is a smaller trophic compartment consisting of predators likely feeding on enchytraeids and potentially nematodes.

  • the underestimated importance of belowground carbon input for forest soil Animal Food webs
    Ecology Letters, 2007
    Co-Authors: Melanie M Pollierer, Mark Maraun, Reinhard Langel, Christian Korner, Stefan Scheu

    Abstract:

    : The present study investigated the relative importance of leaf and root carbon input for soil invertebrates. Experimental plots were established at the Swiss Canopy Crane (SCC) site where the forest canopy was enriched with (13)C depleted CO(2) at a target CO(2) concentration of c. 540 p.p.m. We exchanged litter between labelled and unlabelled areas resulting in four treatments: (i) leaf litter and roots labelled, (ii) only leaf litter labelled, (iii) only roots labelled and (iv) unlabelled controls. In plots with only (13)C-labelled roots most of the soil invertebrates studied were significantly depleted in (13)C, e.g. earthworms, chilopods, gastropods, diplurans, collembolans, mites and isopods, indicating that these taxa predominantly obtain their carbon from belowground input. In plots with only (13)C-labelled leaf litter only three taxa, including, e.g. juvenile Glomeris spp. (Diplopoda), were significantly depleted in (13)C suggesting that the majority of soil invertebrates obtain its carbon from roots. This is in stark contrast to the view that decomposer Food webs are based on litter input from aboveground.

Mark Maraun – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Beech trees fuel soil Animal Food webs via root-derived nitrogen
    Basic and Applied Ecology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Sarah L. Zieger, Andrea Holczinger, Janine Sommer, Michaela Rath, Yakov Kuzyakov, Andrea Polle, Mark Maraun, Stefan Scheu

    Abstract:

    Abstract Root-derived resources are receiving increased attention as basal resources for soil Animal Food webs. They predominantly function as carbon and energy resources for microbial metabolism in the rhizosphere, however, root-derived nitrogen may also be important. We explored both the role of root-derived carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) for the nutrition of soil Animal species. Using 13 C and 15 N pulse labeling we followed in situ the flux of shoot-derived C and N into the soil Animal Food web of young beech ( Fagus sylvatica ) and ash ( Fraxinus excelsior ) trees. For labeling with 13 C, trees were exposed to increased atmospheric concentrations of 13 CO 2 and for labeling with 15 N leaves were immersed in a solution of Ca 15 NO 3 . Twenty days after labeling root-derived N was detected in each of the studied soil Animal species whereas incorporation of root-derived C was only detected in the ash rhizosphere. More root-derived N was incorporated into soil Animals from the beech as compared to the ash rhizosphere, in spite of the higher 15 N signatures in fine roots of ash as compared to beech. The results suggest that soil Animal Food webs not only rely on root C but also on root N with the contribution of root N to soil Animal nutrition varying with tree species. This novel pathway of plant N highlights the importance of root-derived resources for soil Animal Food webs.

  • compartmentalization of the soil Animal Food web as indicated by dual analysis of stable isotope ratios 15n 14n and 13c 12c
    Soil Biology & Biochemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Melanie M Pollierer, Stefan Scheu, Reinhard Langel, Mark Maraun

    Abstract:

    Abstract The soil Animal Food web has become a focus of recent ecological research but trophic relationships still remain enigmatic for many taxa. Analysis of stable isotope ratios of N and C provides a powerful tool for disentangling Food web structure. In this study, Animals, roots, soil and litter material from a temperate deciduous forest were analysed. The combined measurement of δ15N and δ13C provided insights into the compartmentalization of the soil Animal Food web. Leaf litter feeders were separated from Animals relying mainly on recent belowground carbon resources and from Animals feeding on older carbon. The trophic pathway of leaf litter-feeding species appears to be a dead end, presumably because leaf litter feeders (mainly diplopods and oribatid mites) are unavailable to predators due to large size and/or strong sclerotization. Endogeic earthworms that rely on older carbon also appear to exist in predator-free space. The data suggest that the largest trophic compartment constitutes of ectomycorrhizal feeders and their predators. Additionally, there is a smaller trophic compartment consisting of predators likely feeding on enchytraeids and potentially nematodes.

  • the underestimated importance of belowground carbon input for forest soil Animal Food webs
    Ecology Letters, 2007
    Co-Authors: Melanie M Pollierer, Mark Maraun, Reinhard Langel, Christian Korner, Stefan Scheu

    Abstract:

    : The present study investigated the relative importance of leaf and root carbon input for soil invertebrates. Experimental plots were established at the Swiss Canopy Crane (SCC) site where the forest canopy was enriched with (13)C depleted CO(2) at a target CO(2) concentration of c. 540 p.p.m. We exchanged litter between labelled and unlabelled areas resulting in four treatments: (i) leaf litter and roots labelled, (ii) only leaf litter labelled, (iii) only roots labelled and (iv) unlabelled controls. In plots with only (13)C-labelled roots most of the soil invertebrates studied were significantly depleted in (13)C, e.g. earthworms, chilopods, gastropods, diplurans, collembolans, mites and isopods, indicating that these taxa predominantly obtain their carbon from belowground input. In plots with only (13)C-labelled leaf litter only three taxa, including, e.g. juvenile Glomeris spp. (Diplopoda), were significantly depleted in (13)C suggesting that the majority of soil invertebrates obtain its carbon from roots. This is in stark contrast to the view that decomposer Food webs are based on litter input from aboveground.