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Serdar Izmirli – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The effects of level of support for Animal Protection organisations on attitudes to the use of Animals and other social issues
    Animal Welfare, 2012
    Co-Authors: Clive J. C. Phillips, Serdar Izmirli
    Abstract:

    Animal Protection issues are being advanced increasingly by Non-Government Organisations, yet the views of their supporters are little understood. We surveyed attitudes towards Animals and other social issues in 3,462 university students from over 103 universities in eleven European and Asian countries. The extent to which those respondents that supported Animal Protection organisations had more concern for Animals than those who did not support such organisations was investigated, and whether this concern was generalised to other world social issues. Of the respondents, 36% sometimes and 6% very often supported Animal Protection organisations and 2% identified themselves as key members. Supporters and key members had increased scores on indices that measured their concerns for Animal welfare (+ 6%), Animals in experimentation (+ 7%), and other major social issues (+ 5%), compared with non-supporters. Supporters were also likely to have lived with pets for longer, suggesting that this was one of the drivers for their increased concern for Animals. Key members of the organisations rated the sentience of humans lower (-9%) than other students rated them, and nearer to that of Animals. The level of support for the organisations was directly related to avoidance of poultry, pork and beef meat. It is concluded that support for Animal Protection organisations is an indicator of attitudes towards Animals and other social issues, and food consumption habits.

Clive J. C. Phillips – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Relationships between Knowledge of Chicken Production Systems and Advocacy by Animal Protection Workers
    Society & Animals, 2018
    Co-Authors: Tara Ross, Clive J. C. Phillips
    Abstract:

    Animal Protection organizations expect their staff to understand and support high welfare standards in Animal production. Relationships between Australian Animal Protection organization workers’ knowledge of chicken production systems, purchasing behavior, and opinion-leading behavior were investigated. Forty-five percent of knowledge questions were answered correctly. Knowledge was mostly gained from Animal Protection organizations and online literature. Knowledgeable respondents were more critical of both conventional and free range/organic chicken systems and were more likely to avoid eating chicken meat, but not eggs. They were more likely to approach those responsible, in government or industry, about welfare issues and were more likely to discuss Animal welfare issues at work and in a social setting. They were also more likely to ask questions about Animal welfare standards of food provided at butchers, farmers’ markets, social meals, and restaurants/cafes. Therefore, knowledge was linked to advocacy for improved Animal welfare by Animal Protection organization workers.

  • The Cross-Cultural Importance of Animal Protection and Other World Social Issues
    Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Michelle Sinclair, Clive J. C. Phillips
    Abstract:

    In an increasingly global landscape, NFP (not-for-profit) initiatives including those addressing Animal Protection, are increasingly operating cross-borders. Doing so without respect, local engagement, and a thorough understanding of the issues of concern is fraught with danger, and potentially wasteful of resources. To this purpose, we sought to understand attitudes to the importance of 13 major world social issues in relation to Animal Protection (including reducing poverty, racial, LGBT and gender equality, environmental Protection, sustainable development, genetic engineering and capital punishment) by surveying 3433 students from at least 103 universities across 12 nations. The emergence of a ‘nature trifecta’ was suggested, with Animal and environmental Protection and sustainable development recurring as the most highly rated in importance across all countries, with these issues also consistently rating amongst the highest in each individual country. It is concluded that significant differences exist between attributed importance of world issues by nation, pointing towards the benefit of tailoring NFP (including Animal Protection) initiatives by country and region. It is also suggested that nation, or more specifically, sociopolitical and cultural region, is a vitally important demographic for consideration in social development.

  • The effects of level of support for Animal Protection organisations on attitudes to the use of Animals and other social issues
    Animal Welfare, 2012
    Co-Authors: Clive J. C. Phillips, Serdar Izmirli
    Abstract:

    Animal Protection issues are being advanced increasingly by Non-Government Organisations, yet the views of their supporters are little understood. We surveyed attitudes towards Animals and other social issues in 3,462 university students from over 103 universities in eleven European and Asian countries. The extent to which those respondents that supported Animal Protection organisations had more concern for Animals than those who did not support such organisations was investigated, and whether this concern was generalised to other world social issues. Of the respondents, 36% sometimes and 6% very often supported Animal Protection organisations and 2% identified themselves as key members. Supporters and key members had increased scores on indices that measured their concerns for Animal welfare (+ 6%), Animals in experimentation (+ 7%), and other major social issues (+ 5%), compared with non-supporters. Supporters were also likely to have lived with pets for longer, suggesting that this was one of the drivers for their increased concern for Animals. Key members of the organisations rated the sentience of humans lower (-9%) than other students rated them, and nearer to that of Animals. The level of support for the organisations was directly related to avoidance of poultry, pork and beef meat. It is concluded that support for Animal Protection organisations is an indicator of attitudes towards Animals and other social issues, and food consumption habits.

Robert Garner – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Animal Protection and Legislators in Britain and the United States
    The Journal of Legislative Studies, 1999
    Co-Authors: Robert Garner
    Abstract:

    This article considers the reaction of legislators to the emergence of Animal Protection as a political issue. A quantitative analysis of legislative behaviour in the House of Commons and the House of Representatives in the late 1980s and early 1990s reveals (mainly through the identification of a small but significant group of legislators willing to promote concern for Animal welfare) that the growing societal concern for Animals has permeated into the political institutions of Britain and the United States. Examining the characteristics of these legislators suggests, moreover, that the most significant variable is party label, with concern for Animals being associated with parties of the centre‐left. It is further suggested that there are good reasons to suppose that this association is no accident and that ideologically, there is a fit between Animal Protection and the ideals of the left.

  • political Animals Animal Protection politics in britain and the united states
    , 1998
    Co-Authors: Robert Garner
    Abstract:

    Acknowledgements List of Abbreviations List of Tables Introduction The Institutional Framework of Animal Protection The Economics and Politics of Animal Exploitation The Animal Protection Movement: Recruitment, Ideology and Strategy Lobbying for Animals Parliament and Animal Protection American Legislators and Animal Protection The Politics of Farm Animal Welfare in the United States The Politics of Farm Animal Welfare in Britain The Politics of Animal Research in Britain The Politics of Animal Research in the United States Conclusion: Animal Protection and Pluralist Politics Index

  • American Legislators and Animal Protection
    Political Animals, 1998
    Co-Authors: Robert Garner
    Abstract:

    For reasons already explored, Congress plays a much more important legislative function than the British House of Commons and because of this, the general role of Congress in Animal Protection decision-making is considered further in Chapters 7 and 10. This chapter is limited to an examination of the characteristics of those members of Congress who have displayed an interest in Animal Protection issues in the period 1985–1994.

Steven Mcculloch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Brexit and Animal Welfare Impact Assessment: Analysis of the Opportunities Brexit Presents for Animal Protection in the UK, EU, and Internationally.
    Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 2019
    Co-Authors: Steven Mcculloch
    Abstract:

    The British people voted in a 2016 referendum to leave the European Union (EU). Brexit presents threats and opportunities to Animal Protection in the United Kingdom (UK), the EU, and internationally. This paper discusses opportunities for Animal Protection in terms of five criteria. These are first, political context; second, regulatory changes; third, economic and trade factors; fourth, institutional- and capacity-related factors; and fifth, EU and international considerations. Brexit permits reform of UK agricultural policy outside of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) to reward high welfare as a public good. The Agriculture Bill, however, does not suggest a radical reform agenda for Animal welfare. Brexit permits a ban on live exports, but the UK Government is consulting on improving welfare, not prohibition. Brexit provides an opportunity to ban the import and sale of fur, but the UK Government has signalled it will work to improve welfare in fur farming. Brexit permits the UK to prohibit the import and sale of foie gras, but the Government has stated a ban may be challenged at the World Trade Organisation (WTO). Brexit allows more stringent Pet Travel Scheme (PETS) requirements to reduce puppy smuggling. Lucy’s Law and stricter enforcement will also mitigate the problem. New sentience legislation provides the opportunity for a fully independent and properly constituted UK Animal Welfare Advisory body conducting Animal welfare impact assessments and ethical appraisal. The Government has proposed sentience legislation but there is a major risk it will not be in place before the UK leaves the EU. The Government has expanded the remit of the Farm Animal Welfare Committee, which is not fully independent and is dominated by veterinary members and agricultural interests. Brexit provides some opportunities for Animal Protection with radical reform of agricultural policy, prohibition of live exports, and banning the import and sale of fur and foie gras. Pre-Brexit, the Government has not demonstrated the political will and commitment to realise these opportunities.

  • Brexit and Animal Welfare Impact Assessment: Analysis of the Threats Brexit Poses to Animal Protection in the UK, EU and Internationally.
    Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 2019
    Co-Authors: Steven Mcculloch
    Abstract:

    The British people voted in a 2016 referendum to leave the European Union (EU). Brexit presents both threats and opportunities to Animal Protection in the United Kingdom (UK), EU and internationally. This paper discusses threats to Animal Protection in terms of five criteria. These are first, political context; second, regulatory changes; third, economic and trade factors; fourth, institutional and capacity-related factors; and fifth, EU and international considerations. The EU has the most progressive Animal welfare laws in the world. The Conservative Government delivering Brexit has a mixed record on Animal Protection. Major time and resource constraints inherent in Brexit risk negatively impacting Animal Protection. Brexit is projected to have a negative economic impact, which is generally associated with lower Animal welfare standards. The development of Brexit policy suggests there to be a substantial risk that the major threat of importing lower welfare products to the UK will materialise. Brexit will reduce the political influence of the progressive Animal Protection lobby in the EU. Post-Brexit, the politically and economically weakened EU and UK risks a detrimental impact on Animal Protection on an international scale. Brexit poses substantial threats to Animal Protection, with a high risk that many threats will materialise. Further research is needed to assess the opportunities presented by Brexit to judge whether Brexit will be overall positive or negative for Animal Protection.

  • Brexit and Animal Protection: Legal and Political Context and a Framework to Assess Impacts on Animal Welfare.
    Animals : an open access journal from MDPI, 2018
    Co-Authors: Steven Mcculloch
    Abstract:

    The British people voted to leave the European Union (EU) in a 2016 referendum. The United Kingdom (UK) has been a member of the EU since the Maastricht Treaty was signed in 1993 and before that a member of the European Communities (EC) since 1973. EU Animal health and welfare regulations and directives have had a major impact on UK Animal Protection policy. Similarly, the UK has had a substantial impact on EU Animal Protection. Brexit represents a substantial political upheaval for Animal Protection policy, with the potential to impact Animal welfare in the UK, EU and internationally. Brexit‘s impact on farmed Animals will determine the overall impact of Brexit on Animals. A major threat to Animal welfare is from importing lower welfare products. A major opportunity is reform of UK agricultural policy to reward high welfare outside the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). A soft Brexit, in which the UK remains in the single market and/or customs union, mitigates the threat of importing lower welfare products. A harder Brexit means threats to Animal welfare are more likely to materialise. Whether threats and opportunities do materialise will depend on political considerations including decisions of key political actors. The Conservative Government delivering Brexit has a problematic relationship with Animal Protection. Furthermore, Brexit represents a shift to the political right, which is not associated with progressive Animal Protection. There is significant political support in the Conservative Party for a hard Brexit. Further research is required to investigate whether the various threats and opportunities are likely to materialise.

Daniel Lunney – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Wildlife management and the debate on the ethics of Animal use. II. A challenge for the Animal Protection movement.
    Pacific Conservation Biology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Daniel Lunney
    Abstract:

    How people coexist and interact with Animals has become an intensely debated issue in recent times, particularly with the rise of the Animal Protection movement following the publication of Peter Singer’s book Animal Liberation in 1975. This paper discusses some shortcomings of the philosophical positions taken in this complex debate. Singer has helped put Animals on a new footing as a group that cannot morally be ignored, but his focus is mainly on individual, familiar Animals that are used or abused by humans. The argument of this paper is that the ethics of managing wildlife hinges on a broader view of Animals, and their contexts, than is apparent from Singer’s text. Wildlife managers aim to conserve populations of a wide range of species, and their habitats, but some mechanisms for achieving these aims, such as research and the control of invasive Animals, are frequently opposed by elements of the Animal Protection movement. We need to adapt our attitude to Animals, particularly wildlife, away from the traditional legacy of a few familiar species to embrace an ethic that is more ecological and relevant to Australian contexts. The case argued here has been to see the critical role of context – geographical, ecological, historical, relational – as a basis for a degree of reconciliation between conservation-oriented wildlife managers and the rising interest in the ethics of Animal use. There is much to be gained for zoologists, wildlife managers and conservation biologists by framing key elements of their case in ethical arguments. Conversely, the challenge for those in the Animal Protection movement is to expand their philosophical ideas to include the ethical imperative of the conservation of populations of wildlife.