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Seongjun Cho – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • nutritional quality of rice bran protein in comparison to Animal and vegetable protein
    Food Chemistry, 2015
    Co-Authors: Sungwook Han, Kyuman Chee, Seongjun Cho

    Abstract:

    Abstract Rice bran protein (RBP) was prepared by alkali extraction and isoelectric precipitation from defatted rice bran. The protein quality of RPB was evaluated and compared to two vegetable Proteins [soy protein (ISP) and rice endosperm protein (REP)] and two Animal Proteins [whey protein (WPI) and casein]. RPB contained 74.93% of protein and its pepsin digestibility and KOH solubility were 89.8% and 91.5%, respectively. In Sprague-Dawley rats, RBP showed protein efficiency ratio, net protein ratio, net protein utilisation, and biological value of 2.39, 3.77, 70.7, and 72.6, which were comparable to the qualities of Animal Proteins. The true digestibility of RBP (94.8%) was significantly higher than that of REP (90.8%), ISP (91.7%) and WPI (92.8%) and the same as that of casein. Protein digestibility corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of RBP was 0.90. These results suggest that rice bran protein appears to be a promising protein source with good biological values and digestibility.

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  • nutritional quality of rice bran protein in comparison to Animal and vegetable protein
    Food Chemistry, 2015
    Co-Authors: Sungwook Han, Kyuman Chee, Seongjun Cho

    Abstract:

    Abstract Rice bran protein (RBP) was prepared by alkali extraction and isoelectric precipitation from defatted rice bran. The protein quality of RPB was evaluated and compared to two vegetable Proteins [soy protein (ISP) and rice endosperm protein (REP)] and two Animal Proteins [whey protein (WPI) and casein]. RPB contained 74.93% of protein and its pepsin digestibility and KOH solubility were 89.8% and 91.5%, respectively. In Sprague-Dawley rats, RBP showed protein efficiency ratio, net protein ratio, net protein utilisation, and biological value of 2.39, 3.77, 70.7, and 72.6, which were comparable to the qualities of Animal Proteins. The true digestibility of RBP (94.8%) was significantly higher than that of REP (90.8%), ISP (91.7%) and WPI (92.8%) and the same as that of casein. Protein digestibility corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of RBP was 0.90. These results suggest that rice bran protein appears to be a promising protein source with good biological values and digestibility.

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L W D Van Raamsdonk – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • new feed ingredients the insect opportunity
    Food Additives and Contaminants Part A-chemistry Analysis Control Exposure & Risk Assessment, 2017
    Co-Authors: L W D Van Raamsdonk, H J Van Der Felsklerx, J De Jong

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTIn the framework of sustainability and a circular economy, new ingredients for feed are desired and, to this end, initiatives for implementing such novel ingredients have been started. The initiatives include a range of different sources, of which insects are of particular interest. Within the European Union, generally, a new feed ingredient should comply with legal constraints in terms of ‘yes, provided that’ its safety commits to a range of legal limits for heavy metals, mycotoxins, pesticides, contaminants, pathogens etc. In the case of Animal Proteins, however, a second legal framework applies which is based on the principle ‘no, unless’. This legislation for eradicating transmissible spongiform encephalopathy consists of prohibitions with a set of derogations applying to specific situations. Insects are currently considered Animal Proteins. The use of insect Proteins is a good case to illustrate this difference between a positive, although restricted, modus and a negative modus for allowing a…

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  • IAG ring test Animal Proteins 2015
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: L W D Van Raamsdonk, J.j.m. Vliege, N.e. Van De Rhee, I.m.j. Scholtens-toma, Theo W. Prins, V.g.z. Pinckaers

    Abstract:

    A ring test was organized for the detection of Animal Proteins in Animal feed by microscopy in the framework of the annual ring tests of the IAG – International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy. The organizer of the ring test was RIKILT – Wageningen UR, The Netherlands. The aim of the ring study was to provide the participants information on the performance of the local implementation of the detection method for their local quality systems. A further aim was to gather information about the application of the microscopic method. The current 2015 version of the IAG ring test for Animal Proteins is the first one in the IAG series of ring tests applying the full new method for microscopy as published in Regulation (EC) 51/2013 amending Annex VI of Regulation (EC) 152/2009 together with accompanying SOPs.

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  • IAG ring test Animal Proteins 2014
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: L W D Van Raamsdonk, V.g.z. Pinckaers, I.m.j. Scholtens-toma, Theo W. Prins, H. Van Der Voet, J.j.m. Vliege

    Abstract:

    A ring test was organized for the detection of Animal Proteins in Animal feed by microscopy in the framework of the annual ring tests of the IAG – International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy. The aim of the ring study was to provide the participants information on the performance of the local implementation of the detection method for their local quality systems. A further aim was to gather information about the application of the microscopic method.

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V.g.z. Pinckaers – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • IAG ring test Animal Proteins 2016
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Van L.w.d. Raamsdonk, J.j.m. Vliege, I.m.j. Scholtens-toma, Theo W. Prins, Van De N.e. Rhee, V.g.z. Pinckaers

    Abstract:

    The annual ring test for the detection of Animal Proteins in Animal feed of the IAG – International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy was organized by RIKILT – Wageningen UR, The Netherlands. The aim of the ring study was to provide the participants information on the performance of the local implementation of the detection method for their local quality systems. A further aim was to gather information about the application of the microscopic method. The current 2016 version of the IAG ring test for Animal Proteins facilitated the full scenario with the methods for microscopy and PCR as published in Regulation (EC) 51/2013 amending Annex VI of Regulation (EC) 152/2009 together with accompanying SOPs. All four samples were based on an artificial feed mimicking a formulation for ruminant feed. Two samples were labelled as fish feed (B and D), which was effectuated by adding 2% of a general fish meal. Adulteration was achieved by adding 0.1% pig MBM (B), 0.1% ruminant MBM (D) and a combination of 0.1% ruminant MBM and 0.1% fish meal (C). This combination of different spikes allowed the diverse application of the detection methods. Forty eight participants enrolled for the ring test, of which 45 submitted microscopic results. Of these, 20 participants applied the combination of microscopic and PCR analysis. Three participants submitted exclusively PCR results.

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  • IAG ring test Animal Proteins 2015
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: L W D Van Raamsdonk, J.j.m. Vliege, N.e. Van De Rhee, I.m.j. Scholtens-toma, Theo W. Prins, V.g.z. Pinckaers

    Abstract:

    A ring test was organized for the detection of Animal Proteins in Animal feed by microscopy in the framework of the annual ring tests of the IAG – International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy. The organizer of the ring test was RIKILT – Wageningen UR, The Netherlands. The aim of the ring study was to provide the participants information on the performance of the local implementation of the detection method for their local quality systems. A further aim was to gather information about the application of the microscopic method. The current 2015 version of the IAG ring test for Animal Proteins is the first one in the IAG series of ring tests applying the full new method for microscopy as published in Regulation (EC) 51/2013 amending Annex VI of Regulation (EC) 152/2009 together with accompanying SOPs.

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  • IAG ring test Animal Proteins 2014
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: L W D Van Raamsdonk, V.g.z. Pinckaers, I.m.j. Scholtens-toma, Theo W. Prins, H. Van Der Voet, J.j.m. Vliege

    Abstract:

    A ring test was organized for the detection of Animal Proteins in Animal feed by microscopy in the framework of the annual ring tests of the IAG – International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy. The aim of the ring study was to provide the participants information on the performance of the local implementation of the detection method for their local quality systems. A further aim was to gather information about the application of the microscopic method.

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