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Anisakiasis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 297 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Hiroshi Honda – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • pet ct findings in acute gastric Anisakiasis
    Clinical Nuclear Medicine, 2014
    Co-Authors: Tomonori Yoshikai, Shingo Baba, Takuro Isoda, Hiroshi Honda

    Abstract:

    : Acute gastric Anisakiasis is caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked fish containing Anisakis larvae. Although several reports have demonstrated the CT features of acute gastric Anisakiasis, little is known about the FDG PET/CT findings. We report a 59-year-old woman who underwent FDG PET/CT and was finally diagnosed as having acute gastric Anisakiasis. The PET/CT demonstrated focal FDG accumulation in the fornix of the gastric wall and lymph nodes in the lesser curvature and paraaortic regions.

  • PET/CT findings in acute gastric Anisakiasis.
    Clinical Nuclear Medicine, 2014
    Co-Authors: Tomonori Yoshikai, Shingo Baba, Takuro Isoda, Hiroshi Honda

    Abstract:

    : Acute gastric Anisakiasis is caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked fish containing Anisakis larvae. Although several reports have demonstrated the CT features of acute gastric Anisakiasis, little is known about the FDG PET/CT findings. We report a 59-year-old woman who underwent FDG PET/CT and was finally diagnosed as having acute gastric Anisakiasis. The PET/CT demonstrated focal FDG accumulation in the fornix of the gastric wall and lymph nodes in the lesser curvature and paraaortic regions.

Naoto Tamai – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Distinguishing gastric Anisakiasis from non-Anisakiasis using unenhanced computed tomography
    Abdominal Radiology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Hirokazu Ashida, Takao Igarashi, Kazuhiko Morikawa, Kenji Motohashi, Kunihiko Fukuda, Naoto Tamai

    Abstract:

    Purpose This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) for distinguishing gastric Anisakiasis from non-Anisakiasis gastric conditions and the reproducibility of CT findings. Methods Fifty-six Anisakiasis and 74 non-Anisakiasis cases with gastric wall thickening on urgent observation using unenhanced CT were included. Using a κ analysis, two radiologists independently assessed the reproducibility of CT findings, including “circumferential gastric wall thickening,” “gastric wall thickening extending more than two segments,” “bulky and low-density gastric wall thickening,” “increase in peri-gastric fat density,” and “ascites.” An Anisakiasis diagnostic score (ADS) was developed for this study and was used to quantitatively evaluate the CT findings. An Anisakiasis diagnostic prediction (ADP) with an appropriate cutoff value was used to further evaluate the ADS. Two radiologists reassessed the findings in consensus to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the CT findings, including the ADP and ADS area under the curve (AUC). Results Considering reproducibility, a substantial agreement (0.6 

  • Distinguishing gastric Anisakiasis from non-Anisakiasis using unenhanced computed tomography.
    Abdominal Radiology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Hirokazu Ashida, Takao Igarashi, Kazuhiko Morikawa, Kenji Motohashi, Kunihiko Fukuda, Naoto Tamai

    Abstract:

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) for distinguishing gastric Anisakiasis from non-Anisakiasis gastric conditions and the reproducibility of CT findings. Fifty-six Anisakiasis and 74 non-Anisakiasis cases with gastric wall thickening on urgent observation using unenhanced CT were included. Using a κ analysis, two radiologists independently assessed the reproducibility of CT findings, including “circumferential gastric wall thickening,” “gastric wall thickening extending more than two segments,” “bulky and low-density gastric wall thickening,” “increase in peri-gastric fat density,” and “ascites.” An Anisakiasis diagnostic score (ADS) was developed for this study and was used to quantitatively evaluate the CT findings. An Anisakiasis diagnostic prediction (ADP) with an appropriate cutoff value was used to further evaluate the ADS. Two radiologists reassessed the findings in consensus to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the CT findings, including the ADP and ADS area under the curve (AUC). Considering reproducibility, a substantial agreement (0.6 

Won Cheol Park – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • chronic gastric Anisakiasis provoking a bleeding gastric ulcer
    Journal of The Korean Surgical Society, 2014
    Co-Authors: Dong Baek Kang, Won Cheol Park

    Abstract:

    Gastric Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused by the gastric mucosal penetration of the Anisakis larvae ingested with raw fish. Acute gastric Anisakiasis is diagnosed by the endoscopic visualization of Anisakis larvae along with mucosal edema, erythema, hemorrhage, and/or an ulcer, whereas chronic Anisakiasis is often observed as a localized tumor commonly occurring in the submucosal layer, and is characterized by eosinophilic granuloma with edema and embedded Anisakis larvae on pathological examination of surgical specimens. We report here a case of chronic gastric Anisakiasis provoking a bleeding gastric ulcer, which is a rare clinical manifestation of this condition.

  • small bowel obstruction caused by acute invasive enteric Anisakiasis
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Dong Baek Kang, Jung Taek Oh, Won Cheol Park

    Abstract:

    Anisakiasis usually occurs in the stomach and can easily be diagnosed by digestive tract endoscopy as opposed to enteric Anisakiasis which is very rare and difficult to be diagnosed definitively. The most important and useful tool in diagnosing enteric Anisakiasis is obtaining an accurate patient history of having eaten raw fish before the onset of symptoms. We report a case of small bowel obstruction caused by acute invasive enteric Anisakiasis. A 60-year-old woman visited the emergency room suffering from sudden abdominal pain. She had eaten raw fish 1 day before the onset of symptom. Radiologic studies showed small bowel obstruction. However, no definitive cause could be found. An emergency laparotomy revealed edematous and dilated proximal jejunum and a focal stenosis of the distal jejunum. Segmental resection of the jejunum was performed, and histopathological examination revealed enteric Anisakiasis. The patient was discharged on the 7th day after surgery following an uneventful course of recovery.