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Ankyloglossia

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Arun B Chitharanjan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Skeletal and dental characteristics in subjects with Ankyloglossia
    Progress in Orthodontics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Bhadrinath Srinivasan, Arun B Chitharanjan

    Abstract:

    Background The role of Ankyloglossia in etiology of malocclusion is not much discussed over the years. The aim of the present study was to assess the skeletal and dental characteristics in subjects with Ankyloglossia. Methods Fifty-seven subjects diagnosed with Ankyloglossia (group 1) were compared with 60 subjects (group 2) without Ankyloglossia, who had class I skeletal base. Ankyloglossia was diagnosed and graded (mild, moderate, severe and very severe) using Kortlow’s method. SNA, SNB, ANB, Go-Gn-SN angle, FMA, maxillary and mandibular intercanine widths and intermolar widths, tooth size-arch length discrepancy in maxillary and mandibular arches and overbite were measured. Independent t test was used to compare the mean parameters between the two groups. Analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significant difference were used to compare mean parameters among various grades of Ankyloglossia. Results Majority of group 1 subjects belonged to class I skeletal base followed by class II and class III skeletal bases. Moderate Ankyloglossia was most common in group 1. The mean maxillary and mandibular intercanine widths and maxillary intermolar width were statistically significant in independent t test ( P  

  • Skeletal and dental characteristics in subjects with Ankyloglossia
    Progress in orthodontics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Bhadrinath Srinivasan, Arun B Chitharanjan

    Abstract:

    Background
    The role of Ankyloglossia in etiology of malocclusion is not much discussed over the years. The aim of the present study was to assess the skeletal and dental characteristics in subjects with Ankyloglossia.

Bhadrinath Srinivasan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Skeletal and dental characteristics in subjects with Ankyloglossia
    Progress in Orthodontics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Bhadrinath Srinivasan, Arun B Chitharanjan

    Abstract:

    Background The role of Ankyloglossia in etiology of malocclusion is not much discussed over the years. The aim of the present study was to assess the skeletal and dental characteristics in subjects with Ankyloglossia. Methods Fifty-seven subjects diagnosed with Ankyloglossia (group 1) were compared with 60 subjects (group 2) without Ankyloglossia, who had class I skeletal base. Ankyloglossia was diagnosed and graded (mild, moderate, severe and very severe) using Kortlow’s method. SNA, SNB, ANB, Go-Gn-SN angle, FMA, maxillary and mandibular intercanine widths and intermolar widths, tooth size-arch length discrepancy in maxillary and mandibular arches and overbite were measured. Independent t test was used to compare the mean parameters between the two groups. Analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significant difference were used to compare mean parameters among various grades of Ankyloglossia. Results Majority of group 1 subjects belonged to class I skeletal base followed by class II and class III skeletal bases. Moderate Ankyloglossia was most common in group 1. The mean maxillary and mandibular intercanine widths and maxillary intermolar width were statistically significant in independent t test ( P  

  • Skeletal and dental characteristics in subjects with Ankyloglossia
    Progress in orthodontics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Bhadrinath Srinivasan, Arun B Chitharanjan

    Abstract:

    Background
    The role of Ankyloglossia in etiology of malocclusion is not much discussed over the years. The aim of the present study was to assess the skeletal and dental characteristics in subjects with Ankyloglossia.

Anna H. Messner – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The effect of Ankyloglossia on speech in children
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Anna H. Messner, Lauren M. Lalakea

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: We wanted to determine whether an-kyloglossia is associated with articulation problems and the effect of frenuloplasty on speech and tongue mobility. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a prospective study of 30 children aged 1 to 12 years with Ankyloglossia undergoing frenuloplasty. Outcomes were as-sessed by measurements of tongue mobility, speech evaluation, and parent questionnaires. RESULTS: Mean tongue protrusion improved from 14.2 mm preoperatively to 25.8 mm postoperatively (P < 0.01). Similarly, mean tongue elevation im-proved from 5.2 to 22 mm (P < 0.01). Preoperative speech pathology evaluation documented articu-lation problems thought due to Ankyloglossia in 15 of 21 children. Postoperative evaluation in 15 of these children showed improvement in articulation in 9, no change in 4 who had normal speech pre-operatively, and an ongoing articulation disorder in 2. Parent perception of speech intelligibility on a scale of 1 to 5 improved from 3.4 to 4.2 (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Tongue mobility and speech im-prove significantly after frenuloplasty in children with Ankyloglossia who have articulation problems. (Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2002;127:539-45.) The diagnosis and management of Ankyloglossia in the pediatric population have long been contro-versial topics.1 Ankyloglossia, commonly known as “tongue-tie, ” is a congenital oral anomaly char-acterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum and may result in a varying degree of decreased tongue tip mobility. Opinions range widely re-garding the significance of this anomaly; some believe Ankyloglossia is only rarely symptomat-ic,2,3 whereas others believe it may lead to a host of problems, including infant feeding difficulties, speech disorders, and various mechanical and so-cial issues related to the inability of the tongue to protrude sufficiently.4-7 The goal of the present investigation was to prospectively study children aged 1 to 12 years with a diagnosis of Ankyloglossia to determine (1) the frequency of speech problems in these children compared with normative data, (2) the effect of frenotomy/frenuloplasty on speech, (3) the effect of frenotomy/frenuloplasty on tongue mobility, and (4) the incidence of any surgical complica-tions

  • Ankyloglossia: the adolescent and adult perspective.
    Otolaryngology–head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 2003
    Co-Authors: M.lauren Lalakea, Anna H. Messner

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objectives We sought to characterize examination findings and functional limitations due to Ankyloglossia in adolescents and adults and to evaluate frenuloplasty in this group. Study design A prospective study was conducted of 15 individuals with Ankyloglossia aged 14 to 68 years. Baseline symptoms were recorded by questionnaire, and tongue mobility measures were compared with that of 20 control subjects. Six subjects were reassessed postfrenuloplasty. Results Thirteen of 14 patients with uncorrected Ankyloglossia (93%) noted symptoms including speech problems (50%) and mechanical limitations (57%), such as difficulty licking the lips. Mean tongue protrusion and elevation at baseline measured 15.5 ± 6.0 mm and 13.6 ± 8.0 mm, respectively, for patients and 32.0 ± 3.9 mm and 30.3 ± 4.9 mm for control subjects (P Conclusion Symptoms related to Ankyloglossia are prevalent in this age group and respond favorably to frenuloplasty.

  • Ankyloglossia: does it matter?
    Pediatric clinics of North America, 2003
    Co-Authors: M.lauren Lalakea, Anna H. Messner

    Abstract:

    Ankyloglossia is an uncommon oral anomaly that can cause difficulty with breast-feeding, speech articulation, and mechanical tasks such as licking the lips and kissing. For many years the subject of Ankyloglossia has been controversial, with practitioners of many specialties having widely different views regarding its significance. In many children, Ankyloglossia is asymptomatic; the condition may resolve spontaneously, or affected children may learn to compensate adequately for their decreased lingual mobility. Some children, however, benefit from surgical intervention (frenotomy or frenuloplasty) for their tongue-tie. Parents should be educated about the possible long-term effects of tongue-tie while their child is young (< 1 year of age), so that they may make an informed choice regarding possible therapy.