Antiaromatic Compound - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Antiaromatic Compound

The Experts below are selected from a list of 201 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Antiaromatic Compound – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Manabu Kiguchi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Highly-conducting molecular circuits based on Antiaromaticity.
    Nature communications, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Fujii, Ji-young Shin, Hiroshi Shinokubo, Santiago Marqués-gonzález, Takuya Masuda, Tomoaki Nishino, Narendra P. Arasu, Héctor Vázquez, Manabu Kiguchi

    Abstract:

    Aromaticity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. It is described by Huckel’s rule that states that a cyclic planar π-system is aromatic when it shares 4n+2 π-electrons and Antiaromatic when it possesses 4n π-electrons. Antiaromatic Compounds are predicted to exhibit remarkable charge transport properties and high redox activities. However, it has so far only been possible to measure Compounds with reduced aromaticity but not Antiaromatic species due to their energetic instability. Here, we address these issues by investigating the single-molecule charge transport properties of a genuinely Antiaromatic Compound, showing that Antiaromaticity results in an order of magnitude increase in conductance compared with the aromatic counterpart. Single-molecule current-voltage measurements and ab initio transport calculations reveal that this results from a reduced energy gap and a frontier molecular resonance closer to the Fermi level in the Antiaromatic species. The conductance of the Antiaromatic complex is further modulated electrochemically, demonstrating its potential as a high-conductance transistor.

  • Highly-conducting molecular circuits based on Antiaromaticity
    Nature Communications, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Fujii, Ji-young Shin, Hiroshi Shinokubo, Santiago Marqués-gonzález, Takuya Masuda, Tomoaki Nishino, Narendra P. Arasu, Héctor Vázquez, Manabu Kiguchi

    Abstract:

    Antiaromatic molecules are predicted to have unusual charge transport properties, but are notoriously unstable and reactive. Here, the authors successfully fabricate an Antiaromatic molecular circuit, based on a macrocyclic complex, displaying much higher conductance than its aromatic counterpart. Aromaticity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. It is described by Hückel’s rule that states that a cyclic planar π-system is aromatic when it shares 4 n +2 π-electrons and Antiaromatic when it possesses 4 n π-electrons. Antiaromatic Compounds are predicted to exhibit remarkable charge transport properties and high redox activities. However, it has so far only been possible to measure Compounds with reduced aromaticity but not Antiaromatic species due to their energetic instability. Here, we address these issues by investigating the single-molecule charge transport properties of a genuinely Antiaromatic Compound, showing that Antiaromaticity results in an order of magnitude increase in conductance compared with the aromatic counterpart. Single-molecule current–voltage measurements and ab initio transport calculations reveal that this results from a reduced energy gap and a frontier molecular resonance closer to the Fermi level in the Antiaromatic species. The conductance of the Antiaromatic complex is further modulated electrochemically, demonstrating its potential as a high-conductance transistor.

Hiroshi Shinokubo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Highly-conducting molecular circuits based on Antiaromaticity
    Nature Communications, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Fujii, Ji-young Shin, Hiroshi Shinokubo, Santiago Marqués-gonzález, Takuya Masuda, Tomoaki Nishino, Narendra P. Arasu, Héctor Vázquez, Manabu Kiguchi

    Abstract:

    Antiaromatic molecules are predicted to have unusual charge transport properties, but are notoriously unstable and reactive. Here, the authors successfully fabricate an Antiaromatic molecular circuit, based on a macrocyclic complex, displaying much higher conductance than its aromatic counterpart. Aromaticity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. It is described by Hückel’s rule that states that a cyclic planar π-system is aromatic when it shares 4 n +2 π-electrons and Antiaromatic when it possesses 4 n π-electrons. Antiaromatic Compounds are predicted to exhibit remarkable charge transport properties and high redox activities. However, it has so far only been possible to measure Compounds with reduced aromaticity but not Antiaromatic species due to their energetic instability. Here, we address these issues by investigating the single-molecule charge transport properties of a genuinely Antiaromatic Compound, showing that Antiaromaticity results in an order of magnitude increase in conductance compared with the aromatic counterpart. Single-molecule current–voltage measurements and ab initio transport calculations reveal that this results from a reduced energy gap and a frontier molecular resonance closer to the Fermi level in the Antiaromatic species. The conductance of the Antiaromatic complex is further modulated electrochemically, demonstrating its potential as a high-conductance transistor.

  • Highly-conducting molecular circuits based on Antiaromaticity.
    Nature communications, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Fujii, Ji-young Shin, Hiroshi Shinokubo, Santiago Marqués-gonzález, Takuya Masuda, Tomoaki Nishino, Narendra P. Arasu, Héctor Vázquez, Manabu Kiguchi

    Abstract:

    Aromaticity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. It is described by Huckel’s rule that states that a cyclic planar π-system is aromatic when it shares 4n+2 π-electrons and Antiaromatic when it possesses 4n π-electrons. Antiaromatic Compounds are predicted to exhibit remarkable charge transport properties and high redox activities. However, it has so far only been possible to measure Compounds with reduced aromaticity but not Antiaromatic species due to their energetic instability. Here, we address these issues by investigating the single-molecule charge transport properties of a genuinely Antiaromatic Compound, showing that Antiaromaticity results in an order of magnitude increase in conductance compared with the aromatic counterpart. Single-molecule current-voltage measurements and ab initio transport calculations reveal that this results from a reduced energy gap and a frontier molecular resonance closer to the Fermi level in the Antiaromatic species. The conductance of the Antiaromatic complex is further modulated electrochemically, demonstrating its potential as a high-conductance transistor.

  • An Antiaromatic Electrode‐Active Material Enabling High Capacity and Stable Performance of Rechargeable Batteries
    Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English), 2014
    Co-Authors: Ji-young Shin, Tetsuya Yamada, Hirofumi Yoshikawa, Kunio Awaga, Hiroshi Shinokubo

    Abstract:

    Although aromatic Compounds occupy a central position in organic chemistry, Antiaromatic Compounds have demonstrated little practical utility. Herein we report the application of an Antiaromatic Compound as an electrode-active material in rechargeable batteries. The performance of dimesityl-substituted norcorrole nickel(II) complex (NiNC) as a cathode-active material was examined with a Li metal anode. A maximum discharge capacity of about 207 mAhg−1 was maintained after 100 charge/discharge cycles. Moreover, the bipolar redox property of NiNC enables the construction of a Li metal free rechargeable battery. The high performance of NiNC batteries demonstrates a prospective feature of stable Antiaromatic Compounds as electrode-active materials.

Ji-young Shin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Highly-conducting molecular circuits based on Antiaromaticity
    Nature Communications, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Fujii, Ji-young Shin, Hiroshi Shinokubo, Santiago Marqués-gonzález, Takuya Masuda, Tomoaki Nishino, Narendra P. Arasu, Héctor Vázquez, Manabu Kiguchi

    Abstract:

    Antiaromatic molecules are predicted to have unusual charge transport properties, but are notoriously unstable and reactive. Here, the authors successfully fabricate an Antiaromatic molecular circuit, based on a macrocyclic complex, displaying much higher conductance than its aromatic counterpart. Aromaticity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. It is described by Hückel’s rule that states that a cyclic planar π-system is aromatic when it shares 4 n +2 π-electrons and Antiaromatic when it possesses 4 n π-electrons. Antiaromatic Compounds are predicted to exhibit remarkable charge transport properties and high redox activities. However, it has so far only been possible to measure Compounds with reduced aromaticity but not Antiaromatic species due to their energetic instability. Here, we address these issues by investigating the single-molecule charge transport properties of a genuinely Antiaromatic Compound, showing that Antiaromaticity results in an order of magnitude increase in conductance compared with the aromatic counterpart. Single-molecule current–voltage measurements and ab initio transport calculations reveal that this results from a reduced energy gap and a frontier molecular resonance closer to the Fermi level in the Antiaromatic species. The conductance of the Antiaromatic complex is further modulated electrochemically, demonstrating its potential as a high-conductance transistor.

  • Highly-conducting molecular circuits based on Antiaromaticity.
    Nature communications, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shintaro Fujii, Ji-young Shin, Hiroshi Shinokubo, Santiago Marqués-gonzález, Takuya Masuda, Tomoaki Nishino, Narendra P. Arasu, Héctor Vázquez, Manabu Kiguchi

    Abstract:

    Aromaticity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. It is described by Huckel’s rule that states that a cyclic planar π-system is aromatic when it shares 4n+2 π-electrons and Antiaromatic when it possesses 4n π-electrons. Antiaromatic Compounds are predicted to exhibit remarkable charge transport properties and high redox activities. However, it has so far only been possible to measure Compounds with reduced aromaticity but not Antiaromatic species due to their energetic instability. Here, we address these issues by investigating the single-molecule charge transport properties of a genuinely Antiaromatic Compound, showing that Antiaromaticity results in an order of magnitude increase in conductance compared with the aromatic counterpart. Single-molecule current-voltage measurements and ab initio transport calculations reveal that this results from a reduced energy gap and a frontier molecular resonance closer to the Fermi level in the Antiaromatic species. The conductance of the Antiaromatic complex is further modulated electrochemically, demonstrating its potential as a high-conductance transistor.

  • An Antiaromatic Electrode‐Active Material Enabling High Capacity and Stable Performance of Rechargeable Batteries
    Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English), 2014
    Co-Authors: Ji-young Shin, Tetsuya Yamada, Hirofumi Yoshikawa, Kunio Awaga, Hiroshi Shinokubo

    Abstract:

    Although aromatic Compounds occupy a central position in organic chemistry, Antiaromatic Compounds have demonstrated little practical utility. Herein we report the application of an Antiaromatic Compound as an electrode-active material in rechargeable batteries. The performance of dimesityl-substituted norcorrole nickel(II) complex (NiNC) as a cathode-active material was examined with a Li metal anode. A maximum discharge capacity of about 207 mAhg−1 was maintained after 100 charge/discharge cycles. Moreover, the bipolar redox property of NiNC enables the construction of a Li metal free rechargeable battery. The high performance of NiNC batteries demonstrates a prospective feature of stable Antiaromatic Compounds as electrode-active materials.