Antidepressant Medication - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Antidepressant Medication

The Experts below are selected from a list of 19410 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Mika Kivimaki – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • living alone and Antidepressant Medication use a prospective study in a working age population
    BMC Public Health, 2012
    Co-Authors: Mika Kivimaki, Kirsi Ahola, Laura Pulkkiraback, Sampsa Puttonen, Kaisla Joutsenniemi, Marko Elovainio, Helena Rossi

    Abstract:

    An increasing proportion of the population lives in one-person households. The authors examined whether living alone predicts the use of Antidepressant Medication and whether socioeconomic, psychosocial, or behavioral factors explain this association. The participants were a nationally representative sample of working-age Finns from the Health 2000 Study, totaling 1695 men and 1776 women with a mean age of 44.6 years. In the baseline survey in 2000, living arrangements (living alone vs. not) and potential explanatory factors, including psychosocial factors (social support, work climate, hostility), sociodemographic factors (occupational grade, education, income, unemployment, urbanicity, rental living, housing conditions), and health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, obesity), were measured. Antidepressant Medication use was followed up from 2000 to 2008 through linkage to national prescription registers. Participants living alone had a 1.81-fold (CI = 1.46-2.23) higher purchase rate of Antidepressants during the follow-up period than those who did not live alone. Adjustment for sociodemographic factors attenuated this association by 21% (adjusted OR = 1.64, CI = 1.32-2.05). The corresponding attenuation was 12% after adjustment for psychosocial factors (adjusted OR = 1.71, CI = 1.38-2.11) and 9% after adjustment for health behaviors (adjusted OR = 1.74, CI = 1.41-2.14). Gender-stratified analyses showed that in women the greatest attenuation was related to sociodemographic factors and in men to psychosocial factors. These data suggest that people living alone may be at increased risk of developing mental health problems. The public health value is in recognizing that people who live alone are more likely to have material and psychosocial problems that may contribute to excess mental health problems in this population group.

  • Antidepressant Medication use and future risk of cardiovascular disease the scottish health survey
    European Heart Journal, 2011
    Co-Authors: Mark Hamer, G D Batty, Adrie Seldenrijk, Mika Kivimaki

    Abstract:

    larly in initially healthy samples. Given that Antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are now prescribed not only for depression, but also for a wide range of conditions, this issue has relevance to the general population. We assessed the association between Antidepressant Medication use and future risk of CVD in a representative sample of community-dwelling adults without known CVD. Methods and results A prospective cohort study of 14 784 adults (aged 52.4+ 11.9 years, 43.9% males) without a known history of CVD was drawn from the Scottish Health Surveys. Of these study participants, 4.9% reported the use of Antidepressant Medication. Incident CVD events (comprising CVD death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, coronary surgical pro- cedures, stroke, and heart failure) over 8-year follow-up were ascertained by a linkage to national registers; a total of 1434 events were recorded. The use of tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs) was associated with elevated risk of CVD (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) ¼ 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.77) after accounting for a range of covariates. There was a non-significant association between TCA use and coronary heart disease events (969 events, multivariate-adjusted HR ¼ 1.24, 95% CI, 0.87-1.75). The use of SSRIs was not associated with CVD. Neither class of drug was associated with all-cause mortality risk. Conclusion Although replication is required, the increased risk of CVD in men and women taking TCAs was not explained by

  • Antidepressant Medication use weight gain and risk of type 2 diabetes a population based study
    Diabetes Care, 2010
    Co-Authors: Mika Kivimaki, Marianna Virtanen, Mark Hamer, G D Batty, John R Geddes, Adam G Tabak, Jaana Pentti, Jussi Vahtera

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE To examine Antidepressant Medication use as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and weight gain. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A series of nested studies within a prospective cohort of 151,347 working-aged men and women including 9,197 participants with continuing Antidepressant Medication, 224 with severe depression, and 851 with incident type 2 diabetes during a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, as indicated by national health and prescription registers (the Public Sector study, Finland 1995–2005). RESULTS In the first analysis, the case subjects were individuals with incident type 2 diabetes compared with matched diabetes-free control subjects. Antidepressant use of ≥200 defined daily doses was associated with a doubling of diabetes risk in both participants with no indication of severe depression (odds ratio 1.93 [95% CI 1.48–2.51]) and participants with severe depression (2.65 [1.31–5.39]). In further analyses, the exposed group was Antidepressant users and the reference group was nonusers matched for depression-related characteristics. The 5-year absolute risk of diabetes was 1.1% for nonusers, 1.7% for individuals treated with 200–399 defined daily doses a year, and 2.3% for those with ≥400 defined daily doses ( P trend P trend CONCLUSIONS In these data, continuing use of Antidepressant Medication was associated with an increased relative risk of type 2 diabetes, although the elevation in absolute risk was modest.

Jussi Vahtera – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Antidepressant Medication use weight gain and risk of type 2 diabetes a population based study
    Diabetes Care, 2010
    Co-Authors: Mika Kivimaki, Marianna Virtanen, Mark Hamer, G D Batty, John R Geddes, Adam G Tabak, Jaana Pentti, Jussi Vahtera

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE To examine Antidepressant Medication use as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and weight gain. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A series of nested studies within a prospective cohort of 151,347 working-aged men and women including 9,197 participants with continuing Antidepressant Medication, 224 with severe depression, and 851 with incident type 2 diabetes during a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, as indicated by national health and prescription registers (the Public Sector study, Finland 1995–2005). RESULTS In the first analysis, the case subjects were individuals with incident type 2 diabetes compared with matched diabetes-free control subjects. Antidepressant use of ≥200 defined daily doses was associated with a doubling of diabetes risk in both participants with no indication of severe depression (odds ratio 1.93 [95% CI 1.48–2.51]) and participants with severe depression (2.65 [1.31–5.39]). In further analyses, the exposed group was Antidepressant users and the reference group was nonusers matched for depression-related characteristics. The 5-year absolute risk of diabetes was 1.1% for nonusers, 1.7% for individuals treated with 200–399 defined daily doses a year, and 2.3% for those with ≥400 defined daily doses ( P trend P trend CONCLUSIONS In these data, continuing use of Antidepressant Medication was associated with an increased relative risk of type 2 diabetes, although the elevation in absolute risk was modest.

  • Temporary employment and Antidepressant Medication: A register linkage study
    J PSYCHIATR RES, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jussi Vahtera

    Abstract:

    Evidence on the association between temporary employment and mental health is mixed. This study examined associations of temporary employment with register-based Antidepressant Medication by type and length of temporary job contract and socioeconomic position. Antidepressant prescriptions (1998-2002) were linked to register data for 17,071 men and 48,137 women in 10 Finnish municipalities. Repeated measures analyses over time were adjusted for age, socioeconomic position, and calendar year. After adjustments, temporary employment with a job contract more than 6 months was associated with odds ratio (OR) of 1.18 (95% confidence interval CI 1.03-1.37) for Antidepressant use in men and 0.99 (0.93-1.06) in women. Among temporary employees with a job contract of 6 months or less the corresponding odds ratio was higher (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.19-1.73 in men, OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.09-1.28 in women). Long-term unemployed who were in short-term government-subsidised temporary employment had the highest odds of Antidepressant use (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.23-2.02 in men, OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.20-1.59 in women). During the study period, increase in the prevalence of Antidepressant Medication was more rapid among women in government-subsidised temporary employment than among permanently employed women. Among men, the association between temporary employment and Antidepressant use was stronger within lower grade occupations. The results suggest that using Antidepressants is more pronounced when temporary employment is unstable. (C) 2006 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • work stress mental health and Antidepressant Medication findings from the health 2000 study
    Journal of Affective Disorders, 2007
    Co-Authors: Marianna Virtanen, Jussi Vahtera, Teija Honkonen, Mika Kivimaki, Kirsi Ahola, Arpo Aromaa, Jouko Lonnqvist

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Population-based studies on the association between work stress and mental disorders are scarce, and it is not known whether work stress predicts mental disorders requiring treatment. AIMS: To examine the associations of work stress with DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent Antidepressant Medication. METHODS: 3366 participants from a representative sample of the Finnish working population responded to a survey (The Health 2000 Study). 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders was examined with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Data on Antidepressant prescriptions with a 3-year follow-up period were collected from a nationwide register of Social Insurance Institution. RESULTS: In men and women, high job demands, low job control and high job strain were associated with 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders. After adjustment for lifetime and baseline mental disorders, men with high job demands and high job strain had increased risk of future Antidepressant Medication. CONCLUSIONS: Work stress is associated with mental disorders among both sexes and among men it is a risk factor for mental disorders treated with Antidepressant Medication.

David F Schneider – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • large posttraumatic stress disorder improvement and Antidepressant Medication adherence
    Journal of Affective Disorders, 2020
    Co-Authors: Joanne Salas, Jeffrey F Scherrer, Peter W Tuerk, Carissa Van Den Berkclark, Kathleen M Chard, David F Schneider, Paula P Schnurr, Matthew J Friedman

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Patients with vs. without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more likely to have poor Antidepressant Medication (ADM) adherence but it is unclear if improved PTSD is associated with ADM adherence. We determined if clinically meaningful PTSD symptom reduction was associated with ADM adherence. Methods Electronic health record data (2008–2015) was obtained from 742 Veterans Health Affairs (VHA) patients using PTSD specialty clinics with a PTSD diagnosis and PTSD checklist (PCL) score ≥50. The last PCL in the exposure year after the first PCL≥50 was used to identify patients with a clinically meaningful PCL decrease (≥20 point) versus those without ( Results Patients were 42.2 ± 13.1 years of age, 63.9% white and 18.9% had a clinically meaningful PCL decrease. After controlling for confounding variables, patients with vs. without a clinically meaningful PCL decrease were significantly more likely to be adherent (OR = 1.78; 95% CI:1.16–2.73). However, adherence remained low in both patients with and without meaningful PCL decrease (53.5% vs. 39.3%). Limitations The sample was limited to VHA patients. Patients may not have taken Medication as prescribed. Conclusions Large reductions in PTSD symptoms are associated with ADM adherence. Prior literature suggests ADM adherence improves depression symptoms. Thus, PTSD symptom reduction may lead to better depression outcomes.

  • Antidepressant Medication use and glycaemic control in co morbid type 2 diabetes and depression
    Family Practice, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jay Brieler, Joanne Salas, Jeffrey F Scherrer, Patrick J Lustman, David F Schneider

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: Depression is prevalent in diabetes and is associated with increased risks of hyperglycaemia, morbidity and mortality. The effect of Antidepressant Medication (ADM) on glycaemic control is uncertain owing to a paucity of relevant data. We sought to determine whether the use of ADM is associated with glycaemic control in depressed patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A retrospective cohort study (n = 1399) was conducted using electronic medical record registry data of ambulatory primary care visits from 2008 to 2013. Depression and type 2 diabetes were identified from ICD-9-CM codes; ADM use was determined from prescription orders; and glycaemic control was determined from measures of glycated haemoglobin (A1c). Good glycaemic control was defined as A1c < 7.0% (53 mmol/mol). Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the effect of depression and ADM use on glycaemic control. RESULTS: Good glycaemic control was achieved by 50.9% of depressed subjects receiving ADM versus 34.6% of depressed subjects without ADM. After adjusting for covariates, depressed patients receiving ADM were twice as likely as those not receiving ADM to achieve good glycaemic control (odds ratio = 1.95; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-3.71). CONCLUSIONS: In this retrospective cohort study of a large sample of primary care patients with type 2 diabetes, ADM use was associated with improved glycaemic control.