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Antimicrobial Proteins

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Jensmichael Schroder – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Review: Human Antimicrobial Proteins — effectors of innate immunity:
    Journal of Endotoxin Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jurgen Harder, Regine Gläser, Jensmichael Schroder

    Abstract:

    We live in a world populated by an enormous number of micro-organisms. This necessitates the existence of highly effective mechanisms to control microbial growth. Through many research efforts, a chemical defense system based on the production of Antimicrobial Proteins (AMPs) has been identified. AMPs are endogenous, small Proteins exhibiting Antimicrobial activity against a wide variety of micro-organisms. The wide distribution of these molecules in the plant and animal kingdom reflects their biological significance. Various human AMPs show a potent effect on pathogenic micro-organisms including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the role of AMPs within innate immunity and evaluating their use and/or specific induction to fend off infections. In this review, we provide an overview of the characteristics of human AMPs and discuss examples where AMPs may be involved in the pathogenesis of infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  • review human Antimicrobial Proteins effectors of innate immunity
    Journal of Endotoxin Research, 2007
    Co-Authors: Jurgen Harder, Regine Gläser, Jensmichael Schroder

    Abstract:

    We live in a world populated by an enormous number of micro-organisms. This necessitates the existence of highly effective mechanisms to control microbial growth. Through many research efforts, a chemical defense system based on the production of Antimicrobial Proteins (AMPs) has been identified. AMPs are endogenous, small Proteins exhibiting Antimicrobial activity against a wide variety of micro-organisms. The wide distribution of these molecules in the plant and animal kingdom reflects their biological significance. Various human AMPs show a potent effect on pathogenic micro-organisms including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the role of AMPs within innate immunity and evaluating their use and/or specific induction to fend off infections. In this review, we provide an overview of the characteristics of human AMPs and discuss examples where AMPs may be involved in the pathogenesis of infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  • The role and potential therapeutical applications of Antimicrobial Proteins in infectious and inflammatory diseases.
    Endocrine‚ Metabolic & Immune Disorders-Drug Targets, 2007
    Co-Authors: Jurgen Harder, Regine Gläser, Jensmichael Schroder

    Abstract:

    Antimicrobial Proteins (AMP) are endogenous, gene-encoded Proteins, which are able to kill bacteria, fungi and viruses at micro- and nanomolar concentrations. The constitutive as well as inducible production of AMP provides a rapid first-line of defense against invading microorganisms. The significance of such ancient defense system is reflected by the wide distribution of AMP in the plant and animal kingdom. There is increasing evidence that AMP may play an important role in several infectious and inflammatory diseases such as atopic dermatitis, cystic fibrosis and Crohns disease. In this review we aim to provide a short overview about the role of Antimicrobial Proteins in human diseases. In addition, the use and selective induction of AMP for the development of novel potential therapeutic strategies are addressed. The benefits and possible restrictions of AMP utilization as a new class of antibiotic compounds are discussed.

Jurgen Harder – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Review: Human Antimicrobial Proteins — effectors of innate immunity:
    Journal of Endotoxin Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jurgen Harder, Regine Gläser, Jensmichael Schroder

    Abstract:

    We live in a world populated by an enormous number of micro-organisms. This necessitates the existence of highly effective mechanisms to control microbial growth. Through many research efforts, a chemical defense system based on the production of Antimicrobial Proteins (AMPs) has been identified. AMPs are endogenous, small Proteins exhibiting Antimicrobial activity against a wide variety of micro-organisms. The wide distribution of these molecules in the plant and animal kingdom reflects their biological significance. Various human AMPs show a potent effect on pathogenic micro-organisms including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the role of AMPs within innate immunity and evaluating their use and/or specific induction to fend off infections. In this review, we provide an overview of the characteristics of human AMPs and discuss examples where AMPs may be involved in the pathogenesis of infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  • review human Antimicrobial Proteins effectors of innate immunity
    Journal of Endotoxin Research, 2007
    Co-Authors: Jurgen Harder, Regine Gläser, Jensmichael Schroder

    Abstract:

    We live in a world populated by an enormous number of micro-organisms. This necessitates the existence of highly effective mechanisms to control microbial growth. Through many research efforts, a chemical defense system based on the production of Antimicrobial Proteins (AMPs) has been identified. AMPs are endogenous, small Proteins exhibiting Antimicrobial activity against a wide variety of micro-organisms. The wide distribution of these molecules in the plant and animal kingdom reflects their biological significance. Various human AMPs show a potent effect on pathogenic micro-organisms including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the role of AMPs within innate immunity and evaluating their use and/or specific induction to fend off infections. In this review, we provide an overview of the characteristics of human AMPs and discuss examples where AMPs may be involved in the pathogenesis of infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  • The role and potential therapeutical applications of Antimicrobial Proteins in infectious and inflammatory diseases.
    Endocrine‚ Metabolic & Immune Disorders-Drug Targets, 2007
    Co-Authors: Jurgen Harder, Regine Gläser, Jensmichael Schroder

    Abstract:

    Antimicrobial Proteins (AMP) are endogenous, gene-encoded Proteins, which are able to kill bacteria, fungi and viruses at micro- and nanomolar concentrations. The constitutive as well as inducible production of AMP provides a rapid first-line of defense against invading microorganisms. The significance of such ancient defense system is reflected by the wide distribution of AMP in the plant and animal kingdom. There is increasing evidence that AMP may play an important role in several infectious and inflammatory diseases such as atopic dermatitis, cystic fibrosis and Crohns disease. In this review we aim to provide a short overview about the role of Antimicrobial Proteins in human diseases. In addition, the use and selective induction of AMP for the development of novel potential therapeutic strategies are addressed. The benefits and possible restrictions of AMP utilization as a new class of antibiotic compounds are discussed.

Steven R. Beissinger – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Differential deposition of Antimicrobial Proteins in blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) clutches by laying order
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Liliana D'albamatthew, Steven R. Beissinger

    Abstract:

    Female birds can influence offspring fitness by varying the relative quantities of egg components they deposit within and between clutches. Antimicrobial Proteins (lysozyme, ovotransferrin, and avidin) are significant components of the avian albumen and likely aid in defense of embryos from microbial infection. Within clutches, females may enhance Antimicrobial defense of early-laid eggs to protect them from the high risk of infection incurred before the onset of incubation. Among entire clutches, females may invest more resources in young sired by more

  • differential deposition of Antimicrobial Proteins in blue tit cyanistes caeruleus clutches by laying order and male attractiveness
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Liliana Dalba, Matthew D Shawkey, Peter Korsten, Oscar Vedder, Sjouke A Kingma, Jan Komdeur, Steven R. Beissinger

    Abstract:

    Female birds can influence offspring fitness by varying the relative quantities of egg components they deposit within and between clutches. Antimicrobial Proteins (lysozyme, ovotransferrin, and avidin) are significant components of the avian albumen and likely aid in defense of embryos from microbial infection. Within clutches, females may enhance Antimicrobial defense of early-laid eggs to protect them from the high risk of infection incurred before the onset of incubation. Among entire clutches, females may invest more resources in young sired by more attractive males because they have higher reproductive value. We tested these hypotheses by quantifying Antimicrobial protein distribution within and among clutches in blue tit eggs. Contrary to our hypothesis, clutches showed no differential deposition of lysozyme or avidin within clutches, but eggs laid in the middle of the sequence had higher concentrations of ovotransferrin than eggs in the beginning and end. Consistent with our second hypothesis, we found that females produced eggs with higher concentrations of lysozyme (although not ovotransferrin or avidin) when mated to more attractive (more UV-reflective) males. Furthermore, females mated to polygynous males deposited less lysozyme than those mated to monogamous males. These data suggest that allocation of lysozyme at the clutch level may be a maternal effect mediated by male qualities.

  • do birds differentially distribute Antimicrobial Proteins within clutches of eggs
    Behavioral Ecology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Matthew D Shawkey, Karl L Kosciuch, Frank C Rohwer, Elizabeth R Loos, Jennifer M Wang, Steven R. Beissinger

    Abstract:

    Matthew D. Shawkey, Karl L. Kosciuch, Mark Liu, Frank C. Rohwer, Elizabeth R. Loos, Jennifer M. Wang, and Steven R. Beissinger Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, 137 Mulford Hall #3114, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3114, USA, Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA, Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, 331 Funchess Hall, Auburn, AL 36849, USA, School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University and Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, and Delta Waterfowl, PO Box 3124, Bismarck, ND 38502, USA