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Apicoectomy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 282 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Silvio Valdec – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Guided Apicoectomy using a CAD/CAM drilling template.
    International journal of computerized dentistry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Eveline Sutter, Martin Lotz, Dankrister Rechenberg, Bernd Stadlinger, Martin Rucker, Silvio Valdec

    Abstract:

    AIM
    Modern microsurgical techniques have increased the success rate of Apicoectomy relative to that of traditional approaches. This case report introduces a novel workaround for guided Apicoectomy using a patient-specific computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) three-dimensional (3D)-printed template.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS
    Apicoectomy was performed on the mesial root of tooth 36 using template-guided trephine drilling, followed by retrograde filling with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Initially, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan and an intraoral surface scan were imported into the planning software. After superimposition, virtual planning was performed to determine the exact localization for root resection. Subsequently, a tooth-supported drilling template was designed and 3D printed. Endodontic microsurgical approaches, including root-end cavity preparation and root-end filling, completed the surgical treatment.
    RESULT
    The apical resection was easily feasible. There were no postoperative complications. Radiological assessment after a 6-month period showed signs of reossification.
    CONCLUSION
    Guided Apicoectomy allowed precise root resection, suggesting that this technique may be advantageous in complex anatomical situations.

  • guided Apicoectomy using a cad cam drilling template
    International journal of computerized dentistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Eveline Sutter, Martin Lotz, Dankrister Rechenberg, Bernd Stadlinger, Martin Rucker, Silvio Valdec

    Abstract:

    AIM
    Modern microsurgical techniques have increased the success rate of Apicoectomy relative to that of traditional approaches. This case report introduces a novel workaround for guided Apicoectomy using a patient-specific computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) three-dimensional (3D)-printed template.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS
    Apicoectomy was performed on the mesial root of tooth 36 using template-guided trephine drilling, followed by retrograde filling with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Initially, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan and an intraoral surface scan were imported into the planning software. After superimposition, virtual planning was performed to determine the exact localization for root resection. Subsequently, a tooth-supported drilling template was designed and 3D printed. Endodontic microsurgical approaches, including root-end cavity preparation and root-end filling, completed the surgical treatment.
    RESULT
    The apical resection was easily feasible. There were no postoperative complications. Radiological assessment after a 6-month period showed signs of reossification.
    CONCLUSION
    Guided Apicoectomy allowed precise root resection, suggesting that this technique may be advantageous in complex anatomical situations.

Joshua Moshonov – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The use of the erbium yttrium aluminium garnet (2,940 nm) in a laser-assisted apicectomy procedure
    British Dental Journal, 2008
    Co-Authors: A. Reyhanian, S. Parker, Joshua Moshonov

    Abstract:

    If conventional endodontic treatment is not possible or not successful, apical endodontic surgery may be indicated. New techniques, materials and technologies have been used to increase the already high success rate of root canal treatment. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of the Erbium:YAG (2,940 nm) laser in treatment of apicectomy as a central tool, with the advantages of enhanced patient comfort, better bactericidal and decontamination effects. The apicectomy and retrograde root filling procedure must be assessed as a preferred option for treatment. Successful surgical outcome will be enhanced through appropriate understanding of causative factors and surgical skill. The use of the Erbium:YAG laser in the apicectomy procedure can achieve significant pathogen reduction within the surgical site.

  • The use of the erbium yttrium aluminium garnet (2,940 nm) in a laser-assisted apicectomy procedure
    British Dental Journal, 2008
    Co-Authors: A. Reyhanian, S. Parker, Joshua Moshonov

    Abstract:

    If conventional endodontic treatment is not possible or not successful, apical endodontic surgery may be indicated. New techniques, materials and technologies have been used to increase the already high success rate of root canal treatment. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of the Erbium:YAG (2,940 nm) laser in treatment of apicectomy as a central tool, with the advantages of enhanced patient comfort, better bactericidal and decontamination effects.

Eveline Sutter – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Guided Apicoectomy using a CAD/CAM drilling template.
    International journal of computerized dentistry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Eveline Sutter, Martin Lotz, Dankrister Rechenberg, Bernd Stadlinger, Martin Rucker, Silvio Valdec

    Abstract:

    AIM
    Modern microsurgical techniques have increased the success rate of Apicoectomy relative to that of traditional approaches. This case report introduces a novel workaround for guided Apicoectomy using a patient-specific computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) three-dimensional (3D)-printed template.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS
    Apicoectomy was performed on the mesial root of tooth 36 using template-guided trephine drilling, followed by retrograde filling with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Initially, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan and an intraoral surface scan were imported into the planning software. After superimposition, virtual planning was performed to determine the exact localization for root resection. Subsequently, a tooth-supported drilling template was designed and 3D printed. Endodontic microsurgical approaches, including root-end cavity preparation and root-end filling, completed the surgical treatment.
    RESULT
    The apical resection was easily feasible. There were no postoperative complications. Radiological assessment after a 6-month period showed signs of reossification.
    CONCLUSION
    Guided Apicoectomy allowed precise root resection, suggesting that this technique may be advantageous in complex anatomical situations.

  • guided Apicoectomy using a cad cam drilling template
    International journal of computerized dentistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Eveline Sutter, Martin Lotz, Dankrister Rechenberg, Bernd Stadlinger, Martin Rucker, Silvio Valdec

    Abstract:

    AIM
    Modern microsurgical techniques have increased the success rate of Apicoectomy relative to that of traditional approaches. This case report introduces a novel workaround for guided Apicoectomy using a patient-specific computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) three-dimensional (3D)-printed template.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS
    Apicoectomy was performed on the mesial root of tooth 36 using template-guided trephine drilling, followed by retrograde filling with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Initially, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan and an intraoral surface scan were imported into the planning software. After superimposition, virtual planning was performed to determine the exact localization for root resection. Subsequently, a tooth-supported drilling template was designed and 3D printed. Endodontic microsurgical approaches, including root-end cavity preparation and root-end filling, completed the surgical treatment.
    RESULT
    The apical resection was easily feasible. There were no postoperative complications. Radiological assessment after a 6-month period showed signs of reossification.
    CONCLUSION
    Guided Apicoectomy allowed precise root resection, suggesting that this technique may be advantageous in complex anatomical situations.