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David J. Geveke – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • nonthermal inactivation and sublethal injury of lactobacillus plantarum in Apple Cider by a pilot plant scale continuous supercritical carbon dioxide system
    Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Hyungyun Yuk, David J. Geveke

    Abstract:

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) for inactivating Lactobacillus plantarum in Apple Cider using a continuous system with a gas-liquid metal contactor. Pasteurized Apple Cider without preservatives was inoculated with L. plantarum and processed using a SCCO(2) system at a CO(2) concentration range of 0-12% (g CO(2)/100g product), outlet temperatures of 34, 38, and 42 °C, a system pressure of 7.6 MPa, and a flow rate of 1 L/min. Processing with SCCO(2) significantly (P<0.05) enhanced inactivation of L. plantarum in Apple Cider, resulting in a 5 log reduction with 8% CO(2) at 42 °C. The response surface model indicated that both CO(2) concentration and temperature contributed to the microbial inactivation. The extent of sublethal injury in surviving cells in processed Apple Cider increased as CO(2) concentration and processing temperature increased, however the percent injury dramatically decreased during SCCO(2) processing at 42 °C. Structural damage in cell membranes after SCCO(2) processing was observed by SEM. Refrigeration (4 °C) after SCCO(2) processing effectively inhibited the re-growth of surviving L. plantarum during storage for 28 days. Thus this study suggests that SCCO(2) processing is effective in eliminating L. plantarum and could be applicable for nonthermal pasteurization of Apple Cider.

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  • Nonthermal inactivation and sublethal injury of Lactobacillus plantarum in Apple Cider by a pilot plant scale continuous supercritical carbon dioxide system
    Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Hyungyun Yuk, David J. Geveke

    Abstract:

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO 2 ) for inactivating Lactobacillus plantarum in Apple Cider using a continuous system with a gas-liquid metal contactor. Pasteurized Apple Cider without preservatives was inoculated with L. plantarum and processed using a SCCO 2 system at a CO 2 concentration range of 0–12% (g CO 2 /100 g product), outlet temperatures of 34, 38, and 42 °C, a system pressure of 7.6 MPa, and a flow rate of 1 L/min. Processing with SCCO 2 significantly ( P L. plantarum in Apple Cider, resulting in a 5 log reduction with 8% CO 2 at 42 °C. The response surface model indicated that both CO 2 concentration and temperature contributed to the microbial inactivation. The extent of sublethal injury in surviving cells in processed Apple Cider increased as CO 2 concentration and processing temperature increased, however the percent injury dramatically decreased during SCCO 2 processing at 42 °C. Structural damage in cell membranes after SCCO 2 processing was observed by SEM. Refrigeration (4 °C) after SCCO 2 processing effectively inhibited the re-growth of surviving L. plantarum during storage for 28 days. Thus this study suggests that SCCO 2 processing is effective in eliminating L. plantarum and could be applicable for nonthermal pasteurization of Apple Cider.

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  • Thermal and nonthermal processing of Apple Cider: storage quality under equivalent process conditions
    Journal of Food Quality, 2010
    Co-Authors: Zareena Azhuvalappil, David J. Geveke, Xuetong Fan, Howard Q Zhang

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT
    Three processing techniques: heat, pulsed electric field (PEF) and ultraviolet (UV) light were optimized to achieve a similar 6 log reduction of inoculated Escherichia coli K12 in Apple Cider. Microbial populations (total aerobic and yeast and mold), sensory, color and physical properties (pH and°Brix) of processed Apple Cider were investigated during 4-week storage at 4C. PEF and thermally processed Cider maintained good microbial quality during 4 weeks of storage while UV-treated Cider showed a significant (P 

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Howard Q Zhang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal and nonthermal processing of Apple Cider: storage quality under equivalent process conditions
    Journal of Food Quality, 2010
    Co-Authors: Zareena Azhuvalappil, David J. Geveke, Xuetong Fan, Howard Q Zhang

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT
    Three processing techniques: heat, pulsed electric field (PEF) and ultraviolet (UV) light were optimized to achieve a similar 6 log reduction of inoculated Escherichia coli K12 in Apple Cider. Microbial populations (total aerobic and yeast and mold), sensory, color and physical properties (pH and°Brix) of processed Apple Cider were investigated during 4-week storage at 4C. PEF and thermally processed Cider maintained good microbial quality during 4 weeks of storage while UV-treated Cider showed a significant (P 

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  • thermal and nonthermal processing of Apple Cider storage quality under equivalent process conditions
    Journal of Food Quality, 2010
    Co-Authors: Zareena Azhuvalappil, David J. Geveke, Xuetong Fan, Howard Q Zhang

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT
    Three processing techniques: heat, pulsed electric field (PEF) and ultraviolet (UV) light were optimized to achieve a similar 6 log reduction of inoculated Escherichia coli K12 in Apple Cider. Microbial populations (total aerobic and yeast and mold), sensory, color and physical properties (pH and°Brix) of processed Apple Cider were investigated during 4-week storage at 4C. PEF and thermally processed Cider maintained good microbial quality during 4 weeks of storage while UV-treated Cider showed a significant (P < 0.05) growth in yeast and mold after 2 weeks of storage. As a result,°Brix value decreased significantly (P < 0.05) for UV Cider after 4 weeks of storage. Apple Cider pH was neither affected by any treatment nor by storage. Thermal and UV-pasteurized Ciders faded significantly (P < 0.05) during storage (International Commission on Illumination L*[lightness] and b*[yellow] values increased) compared to PEF Cider. Triangle sensory analysis indicated a significant difference (P < 0.05) in aroma between treatments. PEF-treated Cider was preferred over thermal and UV Cider by sensory panelists at the end of the storage period. The results suggested that PEF-treated Apple Cider had a longer shelf life than UV-treated Cider and a better aroma and color than thermally processed sample.

    PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS
    Nonthermal processes like pulsed electric field (PEF) and ultraviolet (UV) light are developed as alternative pasteurization technologies to heat for their efficacy to extend shelf life and enhance the safety of fresh juice while preserving organoleptic and nutritional qualities. For fair comparison of the effects on quality of juice, both thermal and nonthermal processes must achieve equivalent reduction in microorganism levels. In the present study, the effect of PEF, UV and thermal techniques on Apple Cider quality are compared at conditions optimized to achieve equivalent 6 log reductions in Escherichia coli. Our results showed that PEF extended the shelf-life of Apple Cider by inactivating spoilage microorganisms compared to UV processing, and better preserved the freshness (aroma and color) over traditional thermal processing. Based on these results, PEF process is the best choice among the three technologies studied.

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  • efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide for nonthermal inactivation of escherichia coli k12 in Apple Cider
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Hyungyun Yuk, David J. Geveke, Howard Q Zhang

    Abstract:

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) system with a gas-liquid porous metal contactor for eliminating Escherichia coli K12 in Apple Cider. Pasteurized, preservative-free Apple Cider was inoculated with E. coli K12 and processed using the SCCO(2) system at CO(2) concentrations of 0-10% (wt.%, g CO(2)/100g product), outlet temperatures of 34, 38, and 42 degrees C, a system pressure of 7.6 MPa, and a flow rate of 1L/min. Increased CO(2) concentrations and temperatures significantly (P<0.05) enhanced the bactericidal effect, resulting in a maximum reduction of 7.31 log CFU/mL at 8% CO(2) and 42 degrees C. A response surface model indicated that minimum CO(2) concentrations of 9.9% at 34 degrees C, 7.4% at 38 degrees C, and 5.4% at 42 degrees C are needed to achieve a 5-log reduction of E. coli K12 in Apple Cider. SEM observations showed morphological changes in the cell envelope after SCCO(2) processing. At a processing condition of 8% and 38 degrees C, the reduction of E. coli was 6.03 log and the sublethal injury of the survivors was 84%. The regrowth or survival of E. coli in SCCO(2) processed Apple Cider was not observed during storage for 28 days at 4, 8, and 20 degrees C. Thus this study showed the potential of SCCO(2) processing with a gas-liquid porous metal contactor for the nonthermal pasteurization of Apple Cider.

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Hyungyun Yuk – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • nonthermal inactivation and sublethal injury of lactobacillus plantarum in Apple Cider by a pilot plant scale continuous supercritical carbon dioxide system
    Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Hyungyun Yuk, David J. Geveke

    Abstract:

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) for inactivating Lactobacillus plantarum in Apple Cider using a continuous system with a gas-liquid metal contactor. Pasteurized Apple Cider without preservatives was inoculated with L. plantarum and processed using a SCCO(2) system at a CO(2) concentration range of 0-12% (g CO(2)/100g product), outlet temperatures of 34, 38, and 42 °C, a system pressure of 7.6 MPa, and a flow rate of 1 L/min. Processing with SCCO(2) significantly (P<0.05) enhanced inactivation of L. plantarum in Apple Cider, resulting in a 5 log reduction with 8% CO(2) at 42 °C. The response surface model indicated that both CO(2) concentration and temperature contributed to the microbial inactivation. The extent of sublethal injury in surviving cells in processed Apple Cider increased as CO(2) concentration and processing temperature increased, however the percent injury dramatically decreased during SCCO(2) processing at 42 °C. Structural damage in cell membranes after SCCO(2) processing was observed by SEM. Refrigeration (4 °C) after SCCO(2) processing effectively inhibited the re-growth of surviving L. plantarum during storage for 28 days. Thus this study suggests that SCCO(2) processing is effective in eliminating L. plantarum and could be applicable for nonthermal pasteurization of Apple Cider.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Nonthermal inactivation and sublethal injury of Lactobacillus plantarum in Apple Cider by a pilot plant scale continuous supercritical carbon dioxide system
    Food Microbiology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Hyungyun Yuk, David J. Geveke

    Abstract:

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO 2 ) for inactivating Lactobacillus plantarum in Apple Cider using a continuous system with a gas-liquid metal contactor. Pasteurized Apple Cider without preservatives was inoculated with L. plantarum and processed using a SCCO 2 system at a CO 2 concentration range of 0–12% (g CO 2 /100 g product), outlet temperatures of 34, 38, and 42 °C, a system pressure of 7.6 MPa, and a flow rate of 1 L/min. Processing with SCCO 2 significantly ( P L. plantarum in Apple Cider, resulting in a 5 log reduction with 8% CO 2 at 42 °C. The response surface model indicated that both CO 2 concentration and temperature contributed to the microbial inactivation. The extent of sublethal injury in surviving cells in processed Apple Cider increased as CO 2 concentration and processing temperature increased, however the percent injury dramatically decreased during SCCO 2 processing at 42 °C. Structural damage in cell membranes after SCCO 2 processing was observed by SEM. Refrigeration (4 °C) after SCCO 2 processing effectively inhibited the re-growth of surviving L. plantarum during storage for 28 days. Thus this study suggests that SCCO 2 processing is effective in eliminating L. plantarum and could be applicable for nonthermal pasteurization of Apple Cider.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide for nonthermal inactivation of escherichia coli k12 in Apple Cider
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Hyungyun Yuk, David J. Geveke, Howard Q Zhang

    Abstract:

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) system with a gas-liquid porous metal contactor for eliminating Escherichia coli K12 in Apple Cider. Pasteurized, preservative-free Apple Cider was inoculated with E. coli K12 and processed using the SCCO(2) system at CO(2) concentrations of 0-10% (wt.%, g CO(2)/100g product), outlet temperatures of 34, 38, and 42 degrees C, a system pressure of 7.6 MPa, and a flow rate of 1L/min. Increased CO(2) concentrations and temperatures significantly (P<0.05) enhanced the bactericidal effect, resulting in a maximum reduction of 7.31 log CFU/mL at 8% CO(2) and 42 degrees C. A response surface model indicated that minimum CO(2) concentrations of 9.9% at 34 degrees C, 7.4% at 38 degrees C, and 5.4% at 42 degrees C are needed to achieve a 5-log reduction of E. coli K12 in Apple Cider. SEM observations showed morphological changes in the cell envelope after SCCO(2) processing. At a processing condition of 8% and 38 degrees C, the reduction of E. coli was 6.03 log and the sublethal injury of the survivors was 84%. The regrowth or survival of E. coli in SCCO(2) processed Apple Cider was not observed during storage for 28 days at 4, 8, and 20 degrees C. Thus this study showed the potential of SCCO(2) processing with a gas-liquid porous metal contactor for the nonthermal pasteurization of Apple Cider.

    Free Register to Access Article