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Aquatic Weed

The Experts below are selected from a list of 291 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Lars W J Anderson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a review of Aquatic Weed biology and management research conducted by the united states department of agriculture agricultural research service
    Pest Management Science, 2003
    Co-Authors: Lars W J Anderson

    Abstract:

    Ever-increasing demand for water to irrigate crops, support aquaculture, provide domestic water needs and to protect natural Aquatic and riparian habitats has necessitated research to reduce impacts from a parallel increase in invasive Aquatic Weeds. This paper reviews the past 4-5 years of research by USDA-ARS covering such areas as Weed biology, ecology, physiology and management strategies, including herbicides, biological control and potential for use of natural products. Research approaches range from field-level studies to highly specific molecular and biochemical work, spanning several disciplines and encompassing the most problematic Weeds in these systems. This research has led to new insights into plant competition, host-specificity, and the fate of Aquatic herbicides, their modes of action and effects on the environment. Another hallmark of USDA-ARS research has been its many collaborations with other federal, state action and regulatory agencies and private industry to develop new solutions to Aquatic Weed problems that affect our public natural resources and commercial enterprises.

  • A review of Aquatic Weed biology and management research conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture—Agricultural Research Service†‡
    Pest Management Science, 2003
    Co-Authors: Lars W J Anderson

    Abstract:

    Ever-increasing demand for water to irrigate crops, support aquaculture, provide domestic water needs and to protect natural Aquatic and riparian habitats has necessitated research to reduce impacts from a parallel increase in invasive Aquatic Weeds. This paper reviews the past 4-5 years of research by USDA-ARS covering such areas as Weed biology, ecology, physiology and management strategies, including herbicides, biological control and potential for use of natural products. Research approaches range from field-level studies to highly specific molecular and biochemical work, spanning several disciplines and encompassing the most problematic Weeds in these systems. This research has led to new insights into plant competition, host-specificity, and the fate of Aquatic herbicides, their modes of action and effects on the environment. Another hallmark of USDA-ARS research has been its many collaborations with other federal, state action and regulatory agencies and private industry to develop new solutions to Aquatic Weed problems that affect our public natural resources and commercial enterprises.

S. A. Abbasi – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Generation of highly potent organic fertilizer from pernicious Aquatic Weed Salvinia molesta
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Naseer Hussain, Tasneem Abbasi, S. A. Abbasi

    Abstract:

    Utilization of Salvinia molesta, an Aquatic Weed which is notorious for its allelopathy and invasiveness, has been explored by its vermicomposting. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and plant bioassay tests were conducted to analyze the composition and fertilizer value of S .molesta vermicompost. Germination and seedling growth tests were performed in soil supplemented with vermicompost at levels ranging from 0.75 to 40% by weight of the soil on three common food plants, ladies finger (Abelmoschus esculentus), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and green gram (Vigna radiata). The influence of S. molesta’s vermicompost on some of the physicochemical and biological attributes of the soil was also studied. FT-IR analysis revealed that S. molesta loses its allelopathy, as the chemical compounds that are responsible for it are largely destroyed, in the course of its vermicomposting. There is also an indication that a portion of lignin content of S. molesta is degraded. Vermicompost enhanced the germination success and promoted the morphological growth and biochemical content of the plant species studied. It also bestowed plant friendly physicochemical and biological attributes to the soil. The findings raise the prospect that billions of tons of S. molesta biomass―which not only goes to waste at present but is also a cause of serious harm to the environment―may become utilizable in organic agriculture.

  • a new process for the rapid and direct vermicomposting of the Aquatic Weed salvinia salvinia molesta
    Bioresources and Bioprocessing, 2014
    Co-Authors: T Ganeshkumar, M Premalatha, S Gajalakshmi, S. A. Abbasi

    Abstract:

    Background: The concept of high-rate vermicomposting was successfully used to achieve direct vermicomposting of the Aquatic Weed salvinia – without any precomposting or cow dung supplementation as previously reported processes for the vermicomposting of phytomass had necessitated. Results: Both the epigeic species of earthworms that were explored, Eudrilus eugeniae and Eisenia fetida, provided efficient vermicast production with no mortality, persistent gain in body mass, and good fecundity over the 270day-long course of the reactor operation. In this period, all reactors were pulse-fed at the solid retention time of 15 days and were operated in the pseudo-discretized continuous operation protocol developed earlier by the authors. With this, it was possible to almost completely dampen the influence of natural biodegradation of the feed or grazing by the earthworm born in the vermireactors. This has made it possible to link vermicast production directly to the ability of the earthworm to feed upon, and digest, salvinia. In turn, this enables accurate process monitoring and provides clear pointers on how to improve process efficiency. Conclusion: The paper establishes the capability of high-rate vermicomposting technology developed earlier by the authors in direct and efficient vermicomposting of salvinia without any precomposting or manure supplementation. The findings have very significant implications in improving process economics and consequently process utility. No previous report exists in primary literature on the vermicomposting of salvinia.

  • biogas production from the Aquatic Weed pistia pistia stratiotes
    Bioresource Technology, 1991
    Co-Authors: S. A. Abbasi, P C Nipaney, M B Panholzer

    Abstract:

    Abstract Pistia stratiotes , an Aquatic Weed, was investigated as a substrate for biogas production in batch digestion. An inoculum was necessary to obtain biogas production from the Weed. With Pistia only, production of carbon dioxide alone was high during the first five days of digestion but began to level off thereafter. With inoculated Pistia , a high rate of biogas production was sustained for nearly 10 days and the average methane content was 58–68%. The digesters charged with Pistia alone had significant concentrations of propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, and isovaleric acids. These acids were not present in detectable concentrations, in the digesters running with inoculated Pistia , except during the first 4 days of the digestion when propionic acid was formed. When an inoculum was added to a ‘soured’ digester the performance of the latter improved dramatically.

Ramesh Atmakuru – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • isolation and characterization of cellulose nanofibers from the Aquatic Weed water hyacinth eichhornia crassipes
    Carbohydrate Polymers, 2012
    Co-Authors: Thiripura Sundari Marimuthu, Ramesh Atmakuru

    Abstract:

    The water hyacinth is one of the fast growing perennial Aquatic Weeds with a height of 1 m and doubles their population in 2 weeks and is rich in fiber content. The cellulose nanofibers from the water blocking Aquatic Weed – water hyacinth – were successfully prepared. The crude and pure cellulose microfibers were initially obtained from the Weed plant using the chemical treatments such as bleaching and alkaline and sodium chlorite reactions. The micron-sized fibers obtained from the stems were cryocrushed with liquid nitrogen to release the bundles of nanofibers and followed the sonication for individualization of fibers. The treated fibers were screened through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to confirm the removal of impurities from the fibers. The surface morphology of the aqueous suspension before cryocrushing and after the sonication process was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Thermal stability of the fiber was increased after chemical treatment; this was confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The synthesized nanofibers were in a diameter range of 20–100 nm from the SEM and 25 nm from the TEM analysis. The extracted cellulose nanofibers from the noxious Weeds were used for processing of biodegradable nanocomposites in drug delivery, ligament substitute, filtration, and water purification and also used as flexible optical display in electronics.