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Dennis Tappe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Armillifer-Infected Snakes Sold at Congolese Bushmeat Markets Represent an Emerging Zoonotic Threat
    EcoHealth, 2017
    Co-Authors: Richard Hardi, Dennis Tappe, Mihaly Sulyok, Imre Bodó, Gergely Babocsay, Lajos Rozsa

    Abstract:

    African pythons (Pythonidae) and large vipers ( Bitis spp.) act as definitive hosts for Armillifer armillatus and Armillifer grandis parasites (Crustacea: Pentastomida) in the Congo Basin. Since the proportion of snakes in bushmeat gradually increases, human pentastomiasis is an emerging zoonotic disease. To substantiate the significance of this threat, we surveyed snakes offered for human consumption at bushmeat markets in the Kole district, Democratic Republic of the Congo, for the presence of adult pentastomids. In Bitis vipers ( n  = 40), Armillifer spp. infestations exhibited an 87.5% prevalence and 6.0 median intensity. Parasite abundance covaried positively with viper length, but not with body mass. In pythons ( n  = 13), Armillifer spp. exhibited a 92.3% prevalence and 3.5 median intensity. The positive correlations between parasite abundance and python length or mass were statistically nonsignificant. Ninety-one percent of A. grandis were discovered in vipers and 97% of infected vipers hosted A. grandis , whereas 81% of A. armillatus specimens were found in pythons and 63% of infected pythons hosted A. armillatus. Thus, challenging the widespread notion of strict host specificity, we found ‘reversed’ infections and even a case of coinfection. In this study, we also gathered information about the snake consumption habits of different tribal cultures in the area. Infective parasite ova likely transmit to humans directly by consumption of uncooked meat, or indirectly through contaminated hands, kitchen tools or washing water.

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  • The complete mitochondrial genome of the pentastomid Armillifer grandis (Pentastomida) from the Democratic Republic of Congo
    Mitochondrial DNA Part B, 2017
    Co-Authors: José Horacio Grau, Jason A. Dunlop, Martin Meixner, Dennis Tappe

    Abstract:

    AbstractWe present the first complete mitochondrial genome of the pentastomid Armillifer grandis (Arthropoda: Pentastomida) collected from the lungs of a rhinoceros viper (Bitis nasicornis) in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The full length mitochondrial genome of Armillifer grandis, which measures 16,073 bp in length, contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. A clear A + T bias is observed in the mitogenome of Armillifer grandis with an overall base composition of 34.6% A, 29.4% T, 29% C, and 6.9% G, and a GC content of 35.9%. The gene arrangement is identical to that of previously described pentastomid mitogenomes.

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  • co infections in visceral pentastomiasis democratic republic of the congo
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2016
    Co-Authors: Dennis Tappe, Mihaly Sulyok, Lajos Rozsa, Imre Bodó, Birgit Muntau, Christoph Schoen, Gergely Babocsay, Richard Hardi

    Abstract:

    Snakeborne Armillifer pentastomiasis is an emerging human parasitic infection in rural tropical areas where snake meat is eaten. After a series of severe ocular A. grandis larval infections and anecdotal abdominal infection in Sankuru District, Democratic Republic of the Congo, during 2014-2015, we systematically investigated possible pentastomid etiology in patients who underwent surgery in the region. Histologic and molecular analyses by established pentastomid 18S rDNA- and newly developed Armillifer-specific cytochrome oxidase PCRs revealed larval pentastomid lesions in 3.7% of patients. Some persons had A. armillatus and A. grandis co-infections. Another pentastomid larva, Raillietiella sp., was molecularly detected in 1 patient who had concomitant A. grandis and A. armillatus infection. The PCRs used were suitable for detecting pentastomid species even in highly necrotic tissues. Phylogenetic analyses of Armillifer cytochrome oxidase genes detected multiple local strains.

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Richard Hardi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Armillifer-Infected Snakes Sold at Congolese Bushmeat Markets Represent an Emerging Zoonotic Threat
    EcoHealth, 2017
    Co-Authors: Richard Hardi, Dennis Tappe, Mihaly Sulyok, Imre Bodó, Gergely Babocsay, Lajos Rozsa

    Abstract:

    African pythons (Pythonidae) and large vipers ( Bitis spp.) act as definitive hosts for Armillifer armillatus and Armillifer grandis parasites (Crustacea: Pentastomida) in the Congo Basin. Since the proportion of snakes in bushmeat gradually increases, human pentastomiasis is an emerging zoonotic disease. To substantiate the significance of this threat, we surveyed snakes offered for human consumption at bushmeat markets in the Kole district, Democratic Republic of the Congo, for the presence of adult pentastomids. In Bitis vipers ( n  = 40), Armillifer spp. infestations exhibited an 87.5% prevalence and 6.0 median intensity. Parasite abundance covaried positively with viper length, but not with body mass. In pythons ( n  = 13), Armillifer spp. exhibited a 92.3% prevalence and 3.5 median intensity. The positive correlations between parasite abundance and python length or mass were statistically nonsignificant. Ninety-one percent of A. grandis were discovered in vipers and 97% of infected vipers hosted A. grandis , whereas 81% of A. armillatus specimens were found in pythons and 63% of infected pythons hosted A. armillatus. Thus, challenging the widespread notion of strict host specificity, we found ‘reversed’ infections and even a case of coinfection. In this study, we also gathered information about the snake consumption habits of different tribal cultures in the area. Infective parasite ova likely transmit to humans directly by consumption of uncooked meat, or indirectly through contaminated hands, kitchen tools or washing water.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • co infections in visceral pentastomiasis democratic republic of the congo
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2016
    Co-Authors: Dennis Tappe, Mihaly Sulyok, Lajos Rozsa, Imre Bodó, Birgit Muntau, Christoph Schoen, Gergely Babocsay, Richard Hardi

    Abstract:

    Snakeborne Armillifer pentastomiasis is an emerging human parasitic infection in rural tropical areas where snake meat is eaten. After a series of severe ocular A. grandis larval infections and anecdotal abdominal infection in Sankuru District, Democratic Republic of the Congo, during 2014-2015, we systematically investigated possible pentastomid etiology in patients who underwent surgery in the region. Histologic and molecular analyses by established pentastomid 18S rDNA- and newly developed Armillifer-specific cytochrome oxidase PCRs revealed larval pentastomid lesions in 3.7% of patients. Some persons had A. armillatus and A. grandis co-infections. Another pentastomid larva, Raillietiella sp., was molecularly detected in 1 patient who had concomitant A. grandis and A. armillatus infection. The PCRs used were suitable for detecting pentastomid species even in highly necrotic tissues. Phylogenetic analyses of Armillifer cytochrome oxidase genes detected multiple local strains.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • molecular diagnosis of abdominal Armillifer grandis pentastomiasis in the democratic republic of congo
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Dennis Tappe, Mihaly Sulyok, Lajos Rozsa, Imre Bodó, Alexandra Haeupler, Birgit Muntau, Richard Hardi

    Abstract:

    Pentastomiasis is an emerging snake-borne parasitic zoonosis in the tropics. We describe a molecular and morphological study to diagnose a cluster of asymptomatic abdominal human infections caused by Armillifer grandis. The findings may indicate a silent epidemic in a rural area where severe symptomatic ocular cases with the same parasite species have recently surfaced. Molecular diagnostics are of increasing importance when patient material from remote areas cannot be thoroughly examined locally for logistic reasons.

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Lajos Rozsa – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Armillifer-Infected Snakes Sold at Congolese Bushmeat Markets Represent an Emerging Zoonotic Threat
    EcoHealth, 2017
    Co-Authors: Richard Hardi, Dennis Tappe, Mihaly Sulyok, Imre Bodó, Gergely Babocsay, Lajos Rozsa

    Abstract:

    African pythons (Pythonidae) and large vipers ( Bitis spp.) act as definitive hosts for Armillifer armillatus and Armillifer grandis parasites (Crustacea: Pentastomida) in the Congo Basin. Since the proportion of snakes in bushmeat gradually increases, human pentastomiasis is an emerging zoonotic disease. To substantiate the significance of this threat, we surveyed snakes offered for human consumption at bushmeat markets in the Kole district, Democratic Republic of the Congo, for the presence of adult pentastomids. In Bitis vipers ( n  = 40), Armillifer spp. infestations exhibited an 87.5% prevalence and 6.0 median intensity. Parasite abundance covaried positively with viper length, but not with body mass. In pythons ( n  = 13), Armillifer spp. exhibited a 92.3% prevalence and 3.5 median intensity. The positive correlations between parasite abundance and python length or mass were statistically nonsignificant. Ninety-one percent of A. grandis were discovered in vipers and 97% of infected vipers hosted A. grandis , whereas 81% of A. armillatus specimens were found in pythons and 63% of infected pythons hosted A. armillatus. Thus, challenging the widespread notion of strict host specificity, we found ‘reversed’ infections and even a case of coinfection. In this study, we also gathered information about the snake consumption habits of different tribal cultures in the area. Infective parasite ova likely transmit to humans directly by consumption of uncooked meat, or indirectly through contaminated hands, kitchen tools or washing water.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • co infections in visceral pentastomiasis democratic republic of the congo
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2016
    Co-Authors: Dennis Tappe, Mihaly Sulyok, Lajos Rozsa, Imre Bodó, Birgit Muntau, Christoph Schoen, Gergely Babocsay, Richard Hardi

    Abstract:

    Snakeborne Armillifer pentastomiasis is an emerging human parasitic infection in rural tropical areas where snake meat is eaten. After a series of severe ocular A. grandis larval infections and anecdotal abdominal infection in Sankuru District, Democratic Republic of the Congo, during 2014-2015, we systematically investigated possible pentastomid etiology in patients who underwent surgery in the region. Histologic and molecular analyses by established pentastomid 18S rDNA- and newly developed Armillifer-specific cytochrome oxidase PCRs revealed larval pentastomid lesions in 3.7% of patients. Some persons had A. armillatus and A. grandis co-infections. Another pentastomid larva, Raillietiella sp., was molecularly detected in 1 patient who had concomitant A. grandis and A. armillatus infection. The PCRs used were suitable for detecting pentastomid species even in highly necrotic tissues. Phylogenetic analyses of Armillifer cytochrome oxidase genes detected multiple local strains.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • molecular diagnosis of abdominal Armillifer grandis pentastomiasis in the democratic republic of congo
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Dennis Tappe, Mihaly Sulyok, Lajos Rozsa, Imre Bodó, Alexandra Haeupler, Birgit Muntau, Richard Hardi

    Abstract:

    Pentastomiasis is an emerging snake-borne parasitic zoonosis in the tropics. We describe a molecular and morphological study to diagnose a cluster of asymptomatic abdominal human infections caused by Armillifer grandis. The findings may indicate a silent epidemic in a rural area where severe symptomatic ocular cases with the same parasite species have recently surfaced. Molecular diagnostics are of increasing importance when patient material from remote areas cannot be thoroughly examined locally for logistic reasons.

    Free Register to Access Article