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Robert L Meagher – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A computational model to predict the population dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda
    Journal of Pest Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Adriano G. Garcia, Cláudia P. Ferreira, Wesley A. C. Godoy, Robert L Meagher

    Abstract:

    Among lepidopteran insects, the fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda , deserves special attention because of its agricultural importance. Different computational approaches have been proposed to clarify the dynamics of fall Armyworm populations, but most of them have not been tested in the field and do not include one of the most important variables that influence insect development: the temperature. In this study, we developed a computational model that is able to represent the spatio-temporal dynamics of fall Armyworms in agricultural landscapes composed of Bt and non- Bt areas, allowing the user to define different input variables, such as the crop area, thermal requirements of S. frugiperda , migration rate, rate of larval movement, and insect resistance to transgenic crops. In order to determine the efficiency of the proposed model, we fitted it using a 4-year (2012–2015) FAW monitoring data for an area located in northern Florida, USA. Simulations were run to predict the number of adults in 2016 and examine possible scenarios involving climate change. The model satisfactorily described the main outbreaks of fall Armyworms, estimating values for parameters associated with insect dynamics, i.e., resistance-allele frequency (0.15), migration rate (0.48) and rate of larval movement (0.04). A posterior sensitivity analysis indicated that the frequency of the resistance allele most influenced the model, followed by the migration rate. Our simulations indicated that an increase of 1 °C in weekly mean temperatures could almost double the levels of fall Armyworm populations, drawing attention to the possible consequences of temperature rises for pest dynamics.

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  • inferring the annual migration patterns of fall Armyworm lepidoptera noctuidae in the united states from mitochondrial haplotypes
    Ecology and Evolution, 2012
    Co-Authors: Rodney N Nagoshi, Robert L Meagher, Mirian M Hayroe

    Abstract:

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) or fall Armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in the western hemisphere. In the United States, infestations in corn acreages extend from the Mexican to the Canadian border. Because fall Armyworm does not survive prolonged freezing, the infestations annually affecting most of North America are migrants from southern Texas and Florida, where winter temperatures are mild and host plants are available. A haplotype method was developed that can distinguish between these two geographically distant overwintering populations, with the potential to delineate the associated migratory pathways. Several years of collections from major corn-producing areas in the southern, central, and eastern United States were used to map the geographical distribution of the fall Armyworm haplotypes. From these haplotype profiles, it was possible to develop the most detailed description yet of the annual northward movements of fall Armyworm. The consistency of these results with past studies and the implications on our understanding of fall Armyworm biology are discussed. A better understanding of fall Armyworm populations and their movement is critical for the development of strategies to predict infestation levels and eventually control this pest in the United States.

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  • puerto rico fall Armyworm has only limited interactions with those from brazil or texas but could have substantial exchanges with florida populations
    Journal of Economic Entomology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rodney N Nagoshi, Robert L Meagher, David A Jenkins

    Abstract:

    Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an important agricultural pest that is endemic to Puerto Rico and the rest of the Caribbean islands. Relatively little is known about the population movements of fall Armyworm in the Caribbean and the magnitude of genetic interactions, if any, with populations from North, South, and Central America. To address this issue, a novel method involving mitochondrial haplotype ratios currently being used to study the migration of fall Armyworm in North America was applied to populations in Puerto Rico. The results indicate limited interactions between Puerto Rico fall Armyworm and those from Brazil or Texas but the potential for significant exchanges with populations in Florida.

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Rodney N Nagoshi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Genetic characterization of fall Armyworm ( Spodoptera frugiperda ) in Ecuador and comparisons with regional populations identify likely migratory relationships
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Rodney N Nagoshi, Benjamin Y. Nagoshi, Ernesto Cañarte, Bernardo Navarrete, Ramón Solórzano, Sandra Garcés-carrera

    Abstract:

    Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), is an important agricultural pest native to the Americas that has recently been introduced into the Eastern Hemisphere where it has spread rapidly through most of Africa and much of Asia. The long-term economic consequences of this invasion will depend on how the species and important subpopulations become distributed upon reaching equilibrium, which is expected to be influenced by a number of factors including climate, geography, agricultural practices, and seasonal winds, among others. Much of our understanding of fall Armyworm movements have come from mapping genetically defined subpopulations in the Western Hemisphere, particularly in North America where annual long-distance migrations of thousands of kilometers have been documented and modeled. In contrast, fall Armyworm mapping in much of the rest of the hemisphere is relatively incomplete, with the northern portion of South America particularly lacking despite its potential importance for understanding fall Armyworm migration patterns. Here we describe the first genetic description of fall Armyworm infesting corn in Ecuador, which lies near a likely migration conduit based on the location of regional trade winds. The results were compared with populations from corn habitats in select locations in the Caribbean and South America to investigate the possible migratory relationship between these populations and was further assessed with respect to prevailing wind patterns and the distribution of locations with climate favorable for fall Armyworm population establishment and growth.

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  • inferring the annual migration patterns of fall Armyworm lepidoptera noctuidae in the united states from mitochondrial haplotypes
    Ecology and Evolution, 2012
    Co-Authors: Rodney N Nagoshi, Robert L Meagher, Mirian M Hayroe

    Abstract:

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) or fall Armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in the western hemisphere. In the United States, infestations in corn acreages extend from the Mexican to the Canadian border. Because fall Armyworm does not survive prolonged freezing, the infestations annually affecting most of North America are migrants from southern Texas and Florida, where winter temperatures are mild and host plants are available. A haplotype method was developed that can distinguish between these two geographically distant overwintering populations, with the potential to delineate the associated migratory pathways. Several years of collections from major corn-producing areas in the southern, central, and eastern United States were used to map the geographical distribution of the fall Armyworm haplotypes. From these haplotype profiles, it was possible to develop the most detailed description yet of the annual northward movements of fall Armyworm. The consistency of these results with past studies and the implications on our understanding of fall Armyworm biology are discussed. A better understanding of fall Armyworm populations and their movement is critical for the development of strategies to predict infestation levels and eventually control this pest in the United States.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • puerto rico fall Armyworm has only limited interactions with those from brazil or texas but could have substantial exchanges with florida populations
    Journal of Economic Entomology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rodney N Nagoshi, Robert L Meagher, David A Jenkins

    Abstract:

    Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an important agricultural pest that is endemic to Puerto Rico and the rest of the Caribbean islands. Relatively little is known about the population movements of fall Armyworm in the Caribbean and the magnitude of genetic interactions, if any, with populations from North, South, and Central America. To address this issue, a novel method involving mitochondrial haplotype ratios currently being used to study the migration of fall Armyworm in North America was applied to populations in Puerto Rico. The results indicate limited interactions between Puerto Rico fall Armyworm and those from Brazil or Texas but the potential for significant exchanges with populations in Florida.

    Free Register to Access Article

Mirian M Hayroe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • inferring the annual migration patterns of fall Armyworm lepidoptera noctuidae in the united states from mitochondrial haplotypes
    Ecology and Evolution, 2012
    Co-Authors: Rodney N Nagoshi, Robert L Meagher, Mirian M Hayroe

    Abstract:

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) or fall Armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in the western hemisphere. In the United States, infestations in corn acreages extend from the Mexican to the Canadian border. Because fall Armyworm does not survive prolonged freezing, the infestations annually affecting most of North America are migrants from southern Texas and Florida, where winter temperatures are mild and host plants are available. A haplotype method was developed that can distinguish between these two geographically distant overwintering populations, with the potential to delineate the associated migratory pathways. Several years of collections from major corn-producing areas in the southern, central, and eastern United States were used to map the geographical distribution of the fall Armyworm haplotypes. From these haplotype profiles, it was possible to develop the most detailed description yet of the annual northward movements of fall Armyworm. The consistency of these results with past studies and the implications on our understanding of fall Armyworm biology are discussed. A better understanding of fall Armyworm populations and their movement is critical for the development of strategies to predict infestation levels and eventually control this pest in the United States.

    Free Register to Access Article