Artificial Insemination - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Artificial Insemination

The Experts below are selected from a list of 37968 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Sergi Bonet – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Artificial Insemination with frozen thawed boar sperm
    Molecular Reproduction and Development, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marc Yeste, J E Rodriguezgil, Sergi Bonet

    Abstract:

    Artificial Insemination with frozen-thawed semen in pigs is not a routine technique; its use is restricted to specific cases, such as preservation of valuable genetic material (germplasm banks), safety strategies in case of natural disasters, long-distance transport of sperm, and in combination with sex-sorting. Cryoinjuries resulting from freeze-thawing protocols are a major concern with regard to the fertilization capacity of the treated sperm, which is lower than that of liquid-stored semen. Here, we provide an overview of Artificial Insemination using cryopreserved sperm, and summarize the factors that influence cryopreservation success before, during, and after freeze-thaw (i.e., sperm selection before starting the cryopreservation process, holding time, use of cryoprotectants, and rates of freezing and thawing) and that are driving the identification of biomarkers to predict sensitivity to cryodamage. Three different Artificial Insemination techniques (conventional or intracervical; intrauterine; and deep intrauterine) are also discussed with regards to their relevance when using frozen-thawed semen. Finally, we review the use of additives to freezing and thawing media, given reports that they may maintain and improve the quality and fertilizing capacity of frozen-thawed sperm. In sum, Artificial Insemination with frozen-thawed boar sperm can provide reasonable fertility outcomes, if freezable ejaculates, specific additives, and appropriate Insemination techniques are used.

  • Artificial Insemination with frozen‐thawed boar sperm
    Molecular Reproduction and Development, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marc Yeste, Joan E. Rodríguez-gil, Sergi Bonet

    Abstract:

    Artificial Insemination with frozen-thawed semen in pigs is not a routine technique; its use is restricted to specific cases, such as preservation of valuable genetic material (germplasm banks), safety strategies in case of natural disasters, long-distance transport of sperm, and in combination with sex-sorting. Cryoinjuries resulting from freeze-thawing protocols are a major concern with regard to the fertilization capacity of the treated sperm, which is lower than that of liquid-stored semen. Here, we provide an overview of Artificial Insemination using cryopreserved sperm, and summarize the factors that influence cryopreservation success before, during, and after freeze-thaw (i.e., sperm selection before starting the cryopreservation process, holding time, use of cryoprotectants, and rates of freezing and thawing) and that are driving the identification of biomarkers to predict sensitivity to cryodamage. Three different Artificial Insemination techniques (conventional or intracervical; intrauterine; and deep intrauterine) are also discussed with regards to their relevance when using frozen-thawed semen. Finally, we review the use of additives to freezing and thawing media, given reports that they may maintain and improve the quality and fertilizing capacity of frozen-thawed sperm. In sum, Artificial Insemination with frozen-thawed boar sperm can provide reasonable fertility outcomes, if freezable ejaculates, specific additives, and appropriate Insemination techniques are used.

Marc Yeste – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Artificial Insemination with frozen thawed boar sperm
    Molecular Reproduction and Development, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marc Yeste, J E Rodriguezgil, Sergi Bonet

    Abstract:

    Artificial Insemination with frozen-thawed semen in pigs is not a routine technique; its use is restricted to specific cases, such as preservation of valuable genetic material (germplasm banks), safety strategies in case of natural disasters, long-distance transport of sperm, and in combination with sex-sorting. Cryoinjuries resulting from freeze-thawing protocols are a major concern with regard to the fertilization capacity of the treated sperm, which is lower than that of liquid-stored semen. Here, we provide an overview of Artificial Insemination using cryopreserved sperm, and summarize the factors that influence cryopreservation success before, during, and after freeze-thaw (i.e., sperm selection before starting the cryopreservation process, holding time, use of cryoprotectants, and rates of freezing and thawing) and that are driving the identification of biomarkers to predict sensitivity to cryodamage. Three different Artificial Insemination techniques (conventional or intracervical; intrauterine; and deep intrauterine) are also discussed with regards to their relevance when using frozen-thawed semen. Finally, we review the use of additives to freezing and thawing media, given reports that they may maintain and improve the quality and fertilizing capacity of frozen-thawed sperm. In sum, Artificial Insemination with frozen-thawed boar sperm can provide reasonable fertility outcomes, if freezable ejaculates, specific additives, and appropriate Insemination techniques are used.

  • Artificial Insemination with frozen‐thawed boar sperm
    Molecular Reproduction and Development, 2017
    Co-Authors: Marc Yeste, Joan E. Rodríguez-gil, Sergi Bonet

    Abstract:

    Artificial Insemination with frozen-thawed semen in pigs is not a routine technique; its use is restricted to specific cases, such as preservation of valuable genetic material (germplasm banks), safety strategies in case of natural disasters, long-distance transport of sperm, and in combination with sex-sorting. Cryoinjuries resulting from freeze-thawing protocols are a major concern with regard to the fertilization capacity of the treated sperm, which is lower than that of liquid-stored semen. Here, we provide an overview of Artificial Insemination using cryopreserved sperm, and summarize the factors that influence cryopreservation success before, during, and after freeze-thaw (i.e., sperm selection before starting the cryopreservation process, holding time, use of cryoprotectants, and rates of freezing and thawing) and that are driving the identification of biomarkers to predict sensitivity to cryodamage. Three different Artificial Insemination techniques (conventional or intracervical; intrauterine; and deep intrauterine) are also discussed with regards to their relevance when using frozen-thawed semen. Finally, we review the use of additives to freezing and thawing media, given reports that they may maintain and improve the quality and fertilizing capacity of frozen-thawed sperm. In sum, Artificial Insemination with frozen-thawed boar sperm can provide reasonable fertility outcomes, if freezable ejaculates, specific additives, and appropriate Insemination techniques are used.

I. A. Malecki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Natural Mating and Artificial Insemination
    Animal Welfare, 2011
    Co-Authors: I. A. Malecki, P.k. Rybnik-trzaskowska

    Abstract:

    Understanding normal reproductive behaviour of ratites encourages more efficient farming and improves the sustainability of captive and wild populations. Providing freedom of expression of normal sexual behaviour ensures that birds naturally select their partners, which should increase the success of breeding under natural mating. However, from the farmer’s perspective sexual selection may not always be desired because it may not result in the selection for economically important traits. Artificial selection of mates may result in incompatible pairings, welfare problems and poor fertility. Selection for economic traits is needed to improve efficiency of farming ratites and Artificial Insemination technology could facilitate the fastest rate of improvement. Welfare friendly methods for semen collection and Artificial Insemination have been developed for this purpose whereby normal sexual responses evoked by sexual stimuli lead to sexual crouch, voluntary ejaculation and non-intrusive Artificial Insemination. The lack of fear or aggression in some birds and imprinting to humans in response to stimuli have resulted in the development of positive human–ratite relationship during Artificial Insemination and semen collection. The expression of friendly and sexual behaviour of birds towards humans may have welfare implications, but it could also lead to tamer birds, more efficient production of ratites and a good animal–human relationship.

  • Artificial Insemination technology for ratites: A review
    Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, 2008
    Co-Authors: I. A. Malecki, P. K. Rybnik, G.b. Martin

    Abstract:

    In ratite farming, the low male to female ratio in the mating system restricts genetic improvement and prevents reduction of the number of males kept on-farm for fertilisation of the female flock. These issues can be overcome and the industry can better realise its potential by using Artificial Insemination (AI) technology. It is the only practical method for intensive genetic improvement of reproduction and the production of eggs, chicks, oil, meat and leather. For AI to be feasible, we need reliable methods for semen collection, Artificial Insemination, prolonged storage of spermatozoa in the female tract, high rates of lay, efficient protocols for semen storage, and a panel of quantitative methods for measuring true fertility and hatchability, sperm supply rates in vivo and sperm viability in vitro. For both emus and ostriches, prolonged sperm storage in females has already been demonstrated. Methods for semen collection and Artificial Insemination, using animal-friendly techniques, have also been developed. Semen storage and cryopreservation protocols are yet to be optimised and we still need to overcome the male-dependent rate of lay, but adoption of AI technology by the ratite industries is now feasible. It also seems likely that these technologies will be relevant to wild ratites that need intensive conservation efforts, such as cassowaries, rheas and ostrich subspecies.