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Asterixis

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Hideyuki Sawada – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • transient myoclonic state with Asterixis presenting as persistent hyperperfusion on single photon emission computed tomography a case report
    Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience, 2015
    Co-Authors: Atsushi Umemura, Tomoko Oeda, Hideyuki Sawada

    Abstract:

    Transient myoclonic state with Asterixis is characterized by sudden onset generalized myoclonus and Asterixis without consciousness impairment. Electrophysiological studies have shown that myoclonus correlates with cortical hyperexcitability localized in the primary motor cortex during the symptomatic period. However, it is unclear whether this excitability remains in the asymptomatic period. Here, we report a 79-year-old Japanese man who presented with transient myoclonic state with Asterixis. He had been diagnosed with progressive non-fluent aphasia and he suffered from rhythmic myoclonus; predominantly in the neck, shoulders and upper extremities. Asterixis was observed in the forearms. Brain 123I-iodoamphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography showed focal hyperperfusion in the bilateral precentral gyri even at 3 months after remission of the myoclonus. These data suggest that cortical hyperactivity was persistent without symptoms and led to transient myoclonic state with Asterixis, which could have been due to the underlying neurodegenerative disorder of progressive non-fluent aphasia.

  • Transient myoclonic state with Asterixis presenting as persistent hyperperfusion on single‐photon emission computed tomography: A case report
    Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience, 2014
    Co-Authors: Atsushi Umemura, Tomoko Oeda, Hideyuki Sawada

    Abstract:

    Transient myoclonic state with Asterixis is characterized by sudden onset generalized myoclonus and Asterixis without consciousness impairment. Electrophysiological studies have shown that myoclonus correlates with cortical hyperexcitability localized in the primary motor cortex during the symptomatic period. However, it is unclear whether this excitability remains in the asymptomatic period. Here, we report a 79-year-old Japanese man who presented with transient myoclonic state with Asterixis. He had been diagnosed with progressive non-fluent aphasia and he suffered from rhythmic myoclonus; predominantly in the neck, shoulders and upper extremities. Asterixis was observed in the forearms. Brain 123I-iodoamphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography showed focal hyperperfusion in the bilateral precentral gyri even at 3 months after remission of the myoclonus. These data suggest that cortical hyperactivity was persistent without symptoms and led to transient myoclonic state with Asterixis, which could have been due to the underlying neurodegenerative disorder of progressive non-fluent aphasia.

W M Carroll – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • unilateral Asterixis duetoalesion ofthe ventrolateral thalamus
    , 1994
    Co-Authors: R Stell, W M Carroll

    Abstract:

    A caseofunilateral Asterixis ina man withafocal ischaemic lesion ofthecontralateral ventral thalamus ispresented. Atypically, themovementswerepresent atrestandhada pattern ofactivation thatresulted inaninitial misdiagnosis of epilepsia partialis continua. Thiscase emphasisesthe importanceof electromyographic analysis in establishing the correctdiagnosis of involuntary movementsbefore starting specific treatment. (JNeurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1994;57:878-880)

  • unilateral Asterixis due to a lesion of the ventrolateral thalamus
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 1994
    Co-Authors: R Stell, S Davis, W M Carroll

    Abstract:

    A case of unilateral Asterixis in a man with a focal ischaemic lesion of the contralateral ventral thalamus is presented. Atypically, the movements were present at rest and had a pattern of activation that resulted in an initial misdiagnosis of epilepsia partialis continua. This case emphasises the importance of electromyographic analysis in establishing the correct diagnosis of involuntary movements before starting specific treatment.

Toshihiko Suenaga – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • transient myoclonic state with Asterixis in elderly patients a new syndrome
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 1992
    Co-Authors: Shuji Hashimoto, Junichiro Kawamura, Toru Yamamoto, Ayae Kinoshita, Yoshiaki Segawa, Yuzuru Harada, Toshihiko Suenaga

    Abstract:

    Abstract We report 7 patients who developed acute co-occurences of fragmentary generalized myoclonus and Asterixis. All patients were elderly and had other chronic diseases. This condition appeared acutely, progressed over several hours and then disappeared in 2–3 days with diazepam administration. No sequelae were noted, although most cases developed recurrences. The myoclonus occured spontaneously and was slightly enhanced by action. The myoclonus was widely distributed but predominated in the neck, shoulder girdle, and upper extremities. Opsoclonus was not noted. Clinically apparent myoclonus was not evoked by sensory stimuli. Asterixis was observed in the upper extremities in all cases. Asterixis-like movements of the protruded tongue were also observed. Neurological findings other than the myoclonus and Asterixis were unremarkable. Neither metabolic nor organic abnormalities clearly responsible for this condition were identified. Cerebral potentials preceding the myoclonic jerks recorded in one case suggested that the myoclonus may have been a spontaneous cortical myoclonus. We named this condition a transient myoclonic state with Asterixis (TMA). Awareness of this syndrome is clinically important because of its benign nature, although it can recur.